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Of Mice of Men Analysis

Book review By: samdaman
Classics



This is an analysis of the book "Of Mice of Men". I read this book many times and have decided to write about it.


Submitted:Dec 4, 2012    Reads: 68    Comments: 0    Likes: 0   


Of Mice and Men Analysis

Towards the end of the story of Of Mice and Men, George kills his best friend Lennie to end his misery. Throughout the book, the act of friendship between George and Lennie described very strong and genuine. But many question the friendship after reading about the death of Lennie. Readers who have read this book debate whether or not George's act of murder was justified.

Many readers believe that George's act of murder was justified because he knew that if Lennie lived, he would suffer living in this world. In a way, people say George's act of murder is alike to mercy killing because he killed Lennie only to end his suffering from his mental illness. For example, if a dying patient were suffering more each day, some patients wouldn't want to deal with the pain when they know they're already going to die. And this is when the patient will call for an act of mercy killing. In some states in the United States, mercy killing is tolerated so that people could die with dignity and not suffers from so much pain and agony. Many believe that the idea of mercy killing is wrong, but people believe that dying with pain wouldn't be the better option.

In the contrary, many readers believe that George's act of murder was unjustified because they believe that he didn't have the right to kill Lennie. Even though George was helping Lennie end his misery, murder is murder. People also do not think that the act of mercy killing is not justified because it is still an act of murder. They believe that there is no difference between mercy killing and murder. This is why they do not agree with the contrary.

John Steinbeck really challenges us with the idea of justification. Many readers are challenged after reading Of Mice and Men and still don't have a definite answer. Steinbeck uses many philosophical ideas in his book that challenges the reader to think. As if right now, there is no real answer, but people's answers can differ because of their belief or religion. Just like Ruth Benedict said, "The trouble with life isn't that there is no answer, it's that there are so many answers". So be exposed to many answers and look at different perspectives. Because in that way, it is easier to find an answer.





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