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Child labour refers to the employment of children at regular and sustained labour. This practice is considered exploitative by many international organizations and is illegal in many countries.


Submitted:Feb 14, 2012    Reads: 1,471    Comments: 1    Likes: 0   


Child labour was employed to varying extents through most of history, but entered public dispute with the advent of universal schooling, with changes in working conditions during the industrial revolution, and with the emergence of the concepts of workers and children's right.

In many developed countries, it is considered inappropriate or exploitative if a child below a certain age works (excluding household chores, in a family shop, or school-related work). An employer is usually not permitted to hire a child below a certain minimum age. This minimum age depends on the country and the type of work involved. States ratifying the Minimum Age convention adopted by the International Labor Organization in 1973, have adopted minimum ages varying from 14 to 16. Child labour Laws in United States set the minimum age to work in an establishment without restrictions and without parents' consent at age 16, except for the agricultural industry where children as young as 12 years of age can work in the fields for an unlimited number of non-school hours.

The incidence of child labour in the world decreased from 25% to 10% between 1960 and 2003, according to the World Bank

Child labour is still common in some parts of the world, it can be factory work, mining, prostitution, quarrying, agriculture, helping in the parents' business, having one's own small business (for example selling food), or doing odd jobs. Some children work as guides for tourists, sometimes combined with bringing in business for shops and restaurants (where they may also work as waiters). Other children are forced to do tedious and repetitive jobs such as assembling boxes, polishing shoes, stocking a store's products, or cleaning. However, rather than in factories and sweet meat shop, most child labour occurs in the informal sector, selling many things on the streets, at work in agriculture or hidden away in houses-far from the reach of official labour inspectors and from media scrutiny.

This is one of the most offensive and inhumane act performed by the general community. They know very well that this practice is not legal, but still, people keep on forcing small children to work. This practice must be defended by the legal authorities. The police and other concerned departments must take severe actions against such offenders. This will not only make the people know that this is illegal but also will improve the moral values of our society.





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