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The Voyage South Part 7

Script By: Matthew Bissonnette
Historical fiction



Part 7 of The Voyage South.


Submitted:Oct 15, 2013    Reads: 2    Comments: 0    Likes: 0   


ext. river later

The river south has now begun to narrow, dense woods on either side. Lighting sporadically flashes and covers the land with light as thunder echoes from everywhere. Louis runs south along the muddy river bank. He is breathing heavily and continues to run for awhile then comes to a stop. He then looks to the ground and speaks lowly between breaths.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Though I prefer to use my legs on a trek, I will say that I will miss that canoe.

Louis does not notice that the canoe floats past him carried south by the current seemingly empty. Louis then looks up and when he sees the canoe and seems puzzle.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Fletcher.

He starts walking along the riverbank towards the canoe.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Are you in that canoe?

Then Fletcher's voice speaks out from within it.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Sounds like Lafleur, but that can't be. I thought he would have run the whole way North and would be visiting every brothel in Montreal.

Fletcher sits up and is in the back of the canoe and looks back at him and grins.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Come ashore and pick me up.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I can not do that. This whole time I have been sticking with you so I could kill you like I said. If I come ashore, then you may regret it.

Louis grins.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

If you come ashore I paddle for the next hundred miles.

Fletcher then picks up and paddle and rows the canoe so it runs up onto the beach in front of Louis. They look at each other.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Why did you not go back North?

FLETCHER HARRISON

I could not let my partner or my friend complete this journey by himself.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I appreciate your sentiment. But the rest of this journey may be dangerous. I want you to return to Emily.

FLETCHER HARRISON

We'll do our damn best to see this through. If we never return home, she will grieve for a long time. But someday she will find a man who will always be there. If I don't finish this voyage, it only means she will spend the rest most of her life alone. Now let's go.

Louis nods then gets back into the canoe. Fletcher uses the paddle to move the canoe to the center of the river. Louis picks up a paddle and starts to row, Fletcher then puts down his and lies down. Louis notices him and looks back and Fletcher.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Why are you not rowing?

FLETCHER HARRISON

You said the next hundred miles are yours.

Louis shrugs turns forward and continues to row. Fletcher looks at him and sighs.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Louis, I'm making you and promise.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

What is that?

FLETCHER HARRISON

If anyone calls Louis Lafleur and bastard will Fletcher Harrison is around, Fletcher will kill him then skin him.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I see that you have learned to have a sense of humor from your time with me.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I'm not joking Louis.

Fletcher then picks up and paddle and starts to row.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I will help you paddle for the next hundred miles I guess. I would like to reach the end of our voyage south sooner then ten years from now.

They both laugh as the continue quickly moves south. A flash of lighting momentarily covers everything.

ext. river night

The river south which is wide, on either side a vast distance fields of tall wavering grass. Lighting constantly cast brief glimpses light on everything. The canoe appears, both men rowing quickly, and it heads south rapidly. They are silent for awhile and there is the sound of thunder in the distance. Fletcher then looks at Louis.

FLETCHER HARRISON

How longer can you manage to paddle Louis?

LOUIS LAFLEUR

As long as it takes Fletcher.

FLETCHER HARRISON

If you can manage, we go for as many days as it takes to reach our destination south. But we should not tire ourselves out. So we can row a little slower.

They both begin to paddle the canoe slower and continue in silence for awhile. Fletcher then looks at Louis's back then south again.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Mind if we talk.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I would enjoy that. I have talked more in the past weeks then I have in the past ten years.

FLETCHER HARRISON

When we left, I'll be honest. Talking to you seemed like one of the hardest aspects of our voyage. On my excursions alone, I am not used to talk. Now I find it helps make the time go quicker.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Nor I.

FLETCHER HARRISON

You are a wise men also Louis.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Perhaps I have a natural wisdom for surviving in lands where few men can. But when it comes to wisdom pertaining to life anywhere but the remote wilderness, that is not wisdom Louis Lafleur has.

FLETCHER HARRISON

A while ago on this trip, something has occurred to me and I can not figure it out.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

And what is this question which your great wisdom has been unable to deduce?

FLETCHER HARRISON

There are only a hand few of people like us in the northern wilds. I have heard the names of the best trappers up there, and all men who wander those lands know of Fletcher Harrison.

Louis stops paddling and looks back at Fletcher and they look silently at each other.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Why is it that before the day we met, I had never once heard the name Louis Lafleur?

Louis looks forward then they row.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

You point is quite intriguing Fletcher. The most experienced trappers of know of I, and what most say is not kind. But I have never once heard of you Fletcher Harris, and we both have tracked those lands for the most of our lives.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Why is it that we never had heard of one another.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Seems a mystery as presented itself, and my great wit has not the answer.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Our partnership has just taken a rather strange turn.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

When we have finished, I can not wait to return to those lands.

FLETCHER HARRISON

How long is your next trek up there Louis?

LOUIS LAFLEUR

After I have given Nora the reward, I think I will go for a year or maybe much more. I guess once she is freed from her misery, my weakness will not urge me to return to lands where many men tread often.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I respect your tolerance for solitude Louis, it is a skill of our trade that any trapper must master. It is one skill I will never have, and at that particular skill you are greater then me by much.

They paddle in silence for awhile. Fletcher then looks at Lafleur and speaks.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Now that we both have learned that much of what we told each other was untrue, there is something I would like to know.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Ask your question Fletcher and I will give you a truthful answer.

FLETCHER HARRISON

The first day of our voyage, we told each other a tail.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

You now know that I have mastered the skill of the embellished tale by now.

FLETCHER HARRISON

How much of that story about the widow who nursed you back to health was true?

Louis sighs.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

All of it was true but for the end.

FLETCHER HARRISON

How did your tale really end?

LOUIS LAFLEUR

When she asked me to marry her, I agreed and a week later where man and wife. But I told her that being my wife would require that I be gone many months. But I told her three months at most.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I can surmise this tale ends with Louis Lafleur heart being broken.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

A common occurrence during the course of my life.

FLETCHER HARRISON

What happened?

LOUIS LAFLEUR

She had married someone else since she could not wait for my return. After I went north and did not return for a year.

FLETCHER HARRISON

That is why Nora can not marry you. Because if she does not go north then you believe she will not wait.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

She would wait for me, for I know this. It causes you much pain to know Emily is alone. But you can give up the life we both have lived, I cannot. When I give her the money, then I'm sure she will find some man who will take her as his wife. If only for the wealth I will bestow upon her. For if she was Louis Lafleur's wife, it would mean years alone.

FLETCHER HARRISON

You may love her as much I do my Emily.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I doubt that.

FLETCHER HARRISON

You care for her because she is one of the few who have been kind to you. And she would wait for you. But her happiness means more to you there your own.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I wish that your wise advice about men being able to change there nature was right in the case of Louis Lafleur.

Then they row in silence for awhile.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Since the first tale I told you was not all honest, was your first tale of Fletcher Harrison untrue?

FLETCHER HARRISON

I may have distorted it a little.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

In what way?

FLETCHER HARRISON

I told you I built my wife's house in a few months.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Now I know the mighty Fletcher should have been able to build a home for his wife to be much quicker.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I'm good at our trade, but at first was not so good at house building.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

What are you saying?

FLETCHER HARRISON

First two collapsed the day after I finished.

Then they both laugh as the row south and continue south.

ext. river dawn

The river narrows and now runs through a forest to either side. It is a sunny day as the two trappers in the canoe head south. They are rowing in silence. They continue along in silence for awhile when the forest to one side of the river stops. As the canoe continues south, now there is a large town on that side very close to the shore of the river. Fletcher and Louis look towards the town and realize that several men sit on the bank with fishing poles. Louis and Fletcher look at the men fishing then stop paddling and look at each other.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Do you think we are in any danger of being identified Fletcher?

Fletcher looks towards the men on the shoreline when one of them stands up and points at the two men in the canoe. He yells.

Man with fishing pole

It's them!

Fletcher looks forward.

FLETCHER HARRISON

My wit is not so sharp, but I think we just got discovered.

They both begin to paddle furiously and the canoe picks up speed. They begin to past the town and it now is getting farther behind them. But on the side of the river where the town was is a large, flat grassy field. Fletcher looks behind him and realizes that two men of horseback are now in pursuit and gaining quickly.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I think we may be finished this time Louis.

They both paddle quicker as the horse approach. Then one of the soldiers pulls out a flintlock pistol as he is almost beside them. Fletcher see's him and yells.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Get down Louis!

Louis turns and see's the man with the pistol, but he fires and Louis is struck in the back and he grimaces in pain as blood starts to run down the back of his leather outfit. Louis then drops the paddle into the river and it floats away and he falls back into the canoe. Fletcher yells again.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Louis!

Fletcher then stops paddling then grabs one of the soldiers muskets and turns and aims it at perusing man on horse. He carefully aims and fires. The horse is hit and it then rears up and falls into the river throwing the soldier off. The other soldier on horse begins to get closer to them. Fletcher throws the empty musket into the river and grabs the other one. He carefully aims as the man on the horse aims another pistol at him. They point their weapons at each other for a moment when they both fire. The other horse is hit and it's front legs collapse throwing the rider off. Then Fletcher throws the musket into the river and he grabs the paddle and the canoe picks up speed as the current fastens. Fletcher looks behind him and sees that the two soldiers are now on the river bank watching the two trappers escape south. Fletcher then looks ahead. The river starts to wind through a dense forest, he paddles harder. He looks at Louis.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Will you be OK?

Louis is still bleeding but still answers.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I am no stranger to being wounded as you and I know. But this is the first time I have received a gun wound. It kind of stings a little.

FLETCHER HARRISON

We'll get further south and I'll tend to your wound.

The canoe heads into the forest.

ext. riverbank later

Later in the morning. The canoe is on the shoreline in an area where the forest is not as thick in other areas. The top of Louis's leather outfit is off. He awkwardly holds a cloth undershirt to the wound now that the top of the leather outfit is off. Fletcher has built a fire which is now roaring, Fletcher's large knife is in the flames and the tip glows hot. He stands behind Louis then pulls the smaller knife from out of his boot. He holds it and frowns.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I need to get the lead shot out of you. Are you ready?

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I have suffered worse in my travels.

Fletcher kneels down behind him and Louis let's the bloodied cloth undergarment fall to the ground. He seems to hesitate.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Another pain tolerance test of skill, I'll remember how much noise you make. And if I make more the first time you must dig a bullet out of me, you win.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I would appreciate it if you just got on with this grisly task.

Fletcher then puts the knife into Louis wound. As he digs lightly, Louis grimaces in pain and grunts. They continue for awhile until Fletcher watches as the small lead ball falls to the ground. He then gets up and picks up the glowing knife from the fire and then kneels behind Louis again. He presses it to Louis's back as he groans again. He holds it there as there is a sizzling sound and then pulls the knife away.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I think you will live Louis.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Of my many injuries I have occurred, this is nowhere near worst.

Fletcher gets up and goes to the river and puts the knife into it. Steam rises as the knife cools. He then stands up and returns it to your belt. He looks at Louis and frowns.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Get our top back on and get into the canoe. More soldiers are probably headed this way.

Louis looks at Fletcher and shakes his head.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

You must finish this journey alone.

FLETCHER HARRISON

We don't have time for this.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I won't be of much else. When I have suffered such wounds far up North, I have the luxury of not having to travel the distance left on or journey.

FLETCHER HARRISON

You just have to sit in the canoe, I paddle from here.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I will not be of much help to you Fletcher from here on out. When you cross land, I would only slow you down.

FLETCHER HARRISON

You either get in that canoe or we wait here until you are well enough to travel or we die of old age.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I am a liability only to you know Fletcher.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Either we both make it home, or neither of us do.

Louis looks at Fletcher.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Are you sure?

FLETCHER HARRISON

Unless you want to fight again, and this time you have less of a chance, you do as I say.

Louis nods and gets up. He picks up his leather top and slowly walks to the canoe and gets in the front. Fletcher gets into the back, pushes the canoe into the river, picks up a paddle and starts to row as they head south. Louis sits as he puts his top back on.

FLETCHER HARRISON

We lost one paddle anyways so since I paddle much better then you, you don't have to worry. And as for land, we will cross that bridge when we come to it.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Right now it pains me greatly to move, but perhaps I will recover quicker then I suspect.

FLETCHER HARRISON

From what I've seen, by tomorrow you'll be ready to cross a thousand miles of wilderness with only your knife and your wits.

Louis then lays back in the canoe and looks at the sky while Fletcher paddles south.

ext. forest night

The river south winds through a dense forest and is very narrow. The night is clear and the stars very vibrant. The canoe is continues south, Louis is laying in the front and is breathing heavily. Fletcher is in the back paddling and looks forward. They are silent for awhile when Louis speaks.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

It is my fault that Emily will never see dear Fletcher again. I am sorry partner.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I not sure I understand.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

You where right, we should have headed back north when you suggested it. It is only because of me that nor you or I will ever see home.

FLETCHER HARRISON

We'll be seeing home, I promise you that Louis.

Louis looks at him.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Right now many American soldiers are probably searching for us. They will be to the river south and north. We are trapped.

FLETCHER HARRISON

It might take longer to get back to familiar lands again, but the day will come when we can go back to the places we have always known.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Why are you so sure now Fletcher?

FLETCHER HARRISON

I remember what you said a while back, that life waits for the right time to give us want we seek.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I am not sure I entirely understand you.

FLETCHER HARRISON

It was the morning after last excursion north. For the two months I'm home since I married Emily, every day we just sit on the porch together. She knits and I talk. That day, I told her I wish I had the money so I would never have to leave her again. Life did wait for the right moment.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

What happened next?

FLETCHER HARRISON

British soldiers arrived at the exact moment after I told her that. Just as the moment I spoke of the thing I wanted most, escape from the hell I've known so long, then the means to that escaped arrived.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

And that convinces you we we'll safely return home.

FLETCHER HARRISON

We where meant to go on this voyage south Louis, and meant to go together. I don't think this would have happened if the one joint tale of the exploits of Fletcher Harrison and Louis Lafleur if it ended with both our deaths.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

You know, I'm feeling better already.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I'm sure you are.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

In a week or less, I may be able to help with the return journey.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Well since we only have one paddle now, I guess you should leave the rowing to me.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Forgive my moment of doubt. This journey was meant to free a good man from a torment he did not deserve.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Two good men. I'm sure when our shared tale finally comes to an end, Louis Lafleur will finally be freed of his torment to.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

How much farther?

FLETCHER HARRISON

The map shows this general's house is near this river, if I don't stop we'll be there by tomorrow night.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I wish we had been given a journey where we had to kill and skin a beast Fletcher. That is what we both have spent a lifetime alone doing.

FLETCHER HARRISON

So do I Louis, so do I.

The canoe continues down the river.

ext. river morning

It is a bright morning as the sun rises majestically in the east. The river as widened and is surrounded on both sides with rocky cliffs towering over it. The canoe is still headed south. Louis is in the front laying on his back, he seems to be breathing slowly and his eyes are closed. Fletcher is in the back paddling. He looks up towards the cliffs on either side then at Louis.

FLETCHER HARRISON

So how are you feeling Louis?

Louis weakly speaks.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I will be recovered soon enough.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I'm sure. But for the rest of this journey, how about I do most of the work. You just worry about getting home.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I really wish I had not been wounded Fletcher. When we return home, Louis Lafleur will always feel shame that towards the end of the journey he only slowed you down.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Emily will have to worry for me longer then I wanted, but when I get back we will never be apart again.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I also wish I was still uninjured for another reason.

Fletcher Harrison

Why is that?

Louis Lafleur

Tonight, when we finally confront this unusual prey. I would have gladly done it.

FLETCHER HARRISON

But I know that you really don't want to slay this particular prey.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

True Fletcher. But I would have liked to spare you the responsibility of completing the shameful and dark task which awaited us on our journey together.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I knew from the beginning, from the moment the commander told us why he was sending himself south, I knew I would have to be the one to finish this.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

But you have always sounded like this is something which is not in your character.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Well since much of this trip is about the secrets which haunted us both, I would like to tell you something about the Harrison family legacy.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I will listen, but I fear what you are about to say.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I first year in the northern wilds, I could not take the solitude. I came along a older a skilled trapper. And we started a partnership.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Why have you not done that more.

FLETCHER HARRISON

The first few days of our partnership, he would talk and I would just keep my mouth shut and listen. But then he started to talk of the best trappers who had ever wandered those lands. And then he talked of Harrison, my father.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

What did he tell you.

FLETCHER HARRISON

There was one thing my father had never told me. This trapper I partnered with said that every trading post knew that Harrison and the Harrison before him where the most untrustworthy, cold blooded men who ever lived. They where the greatest trappers who ever traveled those wilds, but no one would agree to travel with them. The Harrison's where feared by most of our trade.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Why did they fear the Harrison men.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I learned later that two trappers had gone missing during my fathers life up there.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Not such an uncommon fate for men of our profession, they are dangerous lands.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Both trappers where good at what they did, both where of known to of entered into a partnership with my father.

Louis looks at Fletcher.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Then I learned my grandfather had also last been seen with with a man who never seen again.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

This legacy, you are not fit to carry it Fletcher. I knew from the beginning that you may kill any beast who walk this Earth, you knew you could never do that to a man.

FLETCHER HARRISON

There is probably no other trapper in the far north that would have agreed to go on this journey with me. Fletcher Harrison may be a great trapper, but most of our profession believe he is from a long line of men who should be feared. I think that is why we have never heard of each other.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Then others of our trade are not so wise and unfair, you are not a man anyone should fear. Any beast that walks this Earth should, but no man upon it.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Another reason I hate those wilds Louis and never want to return is that I am a respected trapper, but also one of the most hated.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Fletcher, my sharp wit tells me that you where adopted.

Fletcher Harrison

Wish you where right Louis, wish you where right.

The canoe continues south.

ext. river night

It is late at night. The river is narrow and suddenly turns east. It is surrounded completely by a dense woulds. The canoe is partially on the muddy shore where the river starts to turn. Louis lays inside it, still breathing heavily. Fletcher is standing on the shore beside the canoe, looking south. Louis then opens his eyes and looks at him.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Fletcher, try to forgive yourself for what it is your about to do. Think of why you did it once this particular tale we shared as reached its conclusion.

Fletcher then looks at Louis.

FLETCHER HARRISON

There are only two problems now.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

And what are these problems you just realized?

FLETCHER HARRISON

The map has been less then accurate during legs of our journey. Also, I prey that he is no family.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I think something other then our unmatched skill has gotten us to the end of our trek south. I'm sure what is about to happen is how the journey was meant to end.

FLETCHER HARRISON

If the map is right, he should live in a manor a mile through that forest. If I am not back by tomorrow, well, I guess this is where we part ways. I'm sure a man who can walk two thousand miles through the darkest lands with nothing but his knife and his wits can make it back home.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Even if I could make the voyage back, I would not leave this shore till either you returned or I died of old age.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Well, guess I will get this over with.

Fletcher then runs south into the forest.

ext. manor later

A gigantic stone manor surrounded by farmers fields in every direction accept for the dense forest to the south. Lights are coming through the windows of the manor. Fletcher then runs out from the wood and towards the manor. He then stands outside the backdoor and sighs deeply. He mutters to himself.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Just think of spending the rest of my life sitting on my porch with my wife. She'll never have to know how her husband acted during this last trek.

Fletcher then deeply inhales. He opens the door to find it unlocked and then enters.

int. inside house moments later

Fletcher is stealthily walking down a hallway. As he passes the entrance to each room, he finds it empty. He then sees the staircase and then ascends it. On the top floor he comes to a long hallway, at the end is a door which is open just a crack. All the other doors are closed. Fletcher then silently moves towards the open door.

int. office of general momenta later

Fletcher opens the door completely. Inside is a large office with pictures on the walls as well as maps of the northern colonies. A man with white hair and in a uniform sits in a chair with his back to Fletcher. Fletcher frowns and pulls the knife out from its sheath and walks towards him. Once he is close, he raises the knife and mutters.

FLETCHER HARRISON

I'm sorry.

But just as Fletcher goes to strike, the man falls out of the chair and lays upon the ground. Blood runs down a side of his face. Then Fletcher see's a flintlock pistol with blood on it on the floor beside him. He looks around then turns to the desk. He then walks towards it and sees a parchment smeared with blood. He looks at it for a second then picks it up. He reads it allowed.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Today I was ordered to call of the search for the two colonial men since military command has demanded that all fighting men begin to mass north for the declaration of war. I am to ride north tomorrow. I will take no more part in this campaign for I know it will cost the lives of countless men under my command. And I do not desire to live a witness the needless loss of our people's lives, the same loss of life our fathers told us of. May god forgive me but I had no choice.

Fletcher then looks down at the dead man again then crumbles up the note and stuffs it into a pocket. He then returns the knife to a sheath in his belt and picks up the pistol. He then goes to leave out the door, but before he exits and looks at the body on the floor.

FLETCHER HARRISON

General, for the rest of my days I will be in your debt for sparing me this. Thank you.

He then goes out the door.

ext. river later

It is late at night as the canoe with Louis laying inside it sits partially in the water. Louis opens his eyes when he realizes that the canoe is being pushed in the water. He then see's Fletcher get in, throw a pistol to the ground, the back and pick up the paddle and start to row. He turns to turn the canoe and he rows it north. Louis looks at him.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Did you find the general?

FLETCHER HARRISON

He is dead Louis. Now we start the journey North.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

We will have a hard time getting by all the American soldiers.

FLETCHER HARRISON

there search for us has been called of, they are headed north to prepare for the war. We should have an easier time.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I hope the journey home is a little more boring.

FLETCHER HARRISON

It will take awhile to get home, longer then it did to get here. The current goes south, I will have to drag the canoe across land. But we will be home soon enough.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Would you mind telling me what happened Fletcher?

FLETCHER HARRISON

I'm going to save that particular untold story for our next voyage Louis.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Good idea, I look forward to hearing it.

FLETCHER HARRISON

So, we have a long journey back. I would like to pass the time by learning more of Louis Lafleur.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

I am afraid to admit that there is no more to know.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Then what should we talk about?

LOUIS LAFLEUR

More of Fletcher Harrison's wisdom is something I would like to hear.

FLETCHER HARRISON

We have a few weeks. I guess I could tell a very small fraction of that wisdom.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

you have my complete attention Fletcher.

FLETCHER HARRISON

Before I start, there is one favor I must ask you Louis.

LOUIS LAFLEUR

Which is?

FLETCHER HARRISON

Next time me and you go on an excursion together, you better do all the paddling or I'll kill you.

They both start laughing as the canoe heads north and vanishes into the darkness of night.





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