Save on all your Printing Needs at 4inkjets.com!

Heart Novel

By: Doug Bremner

Chapter 2,

Chapter 2.

 

Tony and I drove from the hospital in my BMW convertible. As we drove up along GA I-75/85 the drone of a million frogs drowned out the sound of the mechanized vehicles that slid along the 16 lane mechanism of death. Giant billboards declared the benefits of eating chicken over beef in pidgeon English. Another one burst out the details of the Georgia Tech football game in electronic bursts of light.

Walking into the Buckhead bar "Paradox" with Tony the music hit us like a blast of hot air on a hot Georgia night. I walked up to the bar with Tony, checking out some of the hot blondes and trying to remind myself that I was officially married.

 

After ordering we grabbed beers from the bar and headed for a booth. The loud noise of the music made it hard to talk. The gyrating bodies of some of the women on the dance floor was distracting.

 

"So how's Candace?" Tony said.

 

"Oh, you know. The usual thrills of married life."

"Ever think about branching out?"

"What the hell are you talking about?"

"You know, play the field a little bit?"

"No. I'm married, in case you forgot."

"You shouldn't be so uptight, Charlie."

“How do you think Candace would feel about it?"

“She wouldn’t have to find out.”

“Oh, come on.”                                                    

“I mean, when was the last time you guys did it?”

“I don’t remember.”

"Look around you, Charlie. Look at all these hot women. They love doctors, especially surgeons. They're ready to banged, no strings attached."

"Can't you get off this already?"

"Are you hung up?"

"What's with you?"

"Is your marriage satisfying?"

"What are you, some kind of fucking psychoanalyst?"

"I mean, do you do it with her? Like... ever?"

"Not lately."

"So how long has it been?"

"I don't know. A while."

"Like... weeks? months?"

"Yeah, something like that."

"Hey, look, man! There's Candace on the TV!"

We sat back and watched her on the screen. The music was blaring, so all you could see was her face and animated gesticulations as she went on about some potted plant. As I sat and watched her I felt oddly detached, like she had nothing to do with me.

“Let’s get out of here, man,” I said.

We rose from the booth. Everything seemed to slow down. The sweat gleamed off the backs of the people as they danced to the booming music. We left the club. The darkness from the outside poured into the club and permeated everything with its message of death. I guess we all have to die sometime, but I didn’t want to think about it right now.

We moved out onto the street. The brunt weight of the Georgia night hit us in the face. I breathed in the must of the young people as they waited in line to be let into the club. I wondered if any of the younger females found me attractive. They didn’t pay me much attention, though, and we moved on to the parking lot.

I said good bye to Tony, and drove home.

 

 

 

© Copyright 2014Doug Bremner All rights reserved. Doug Bremner has granted theNextBigWriter, LLC non-exclusive rights to display this work on Booksie.com.

© 2014 Booksie | All rights reserved.