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Mango Can Make You Rich

Script By: Juggernaut
Memoir


Mango is divine for Indians everywhere in the world. The history of Mango goes back to thousands of years according to Hindu mythology. Lord Vigneswara or in short Ganesh, known for his love for food always carry a fully ripe Mango fruit in his hand, a symbol of earth’s abundance and prosperity. Mango leaves are used to decorate idols and used in Hindu rituals. Garlands made with Mango leaves are used to decorate door and entry ways in many homes particularly on festival days. From Lord Ganesh to present day Indian, Mango remains the favorite fruit of all time, from green to fully ripe in any shape, color, texture, size or taste; Indians go crazy for Mango. Mango trees may not live thousands of years like Redwood trees of California, but some live up to 300 years still producing fruit.


Submitted:May 2, 2011    Reads: 358    Comments: 0    Likes: 0   


Mango Can Make You Rich
Subba Rao
Mango is divine for Indians everywhere in the world. The history of Mango goes back to thousands of years according to Hindu mythology. Lord Vigneswara or in short Ganesh, known for his love for food always carry a fully ripe Mango fruit in his hand, a symbol of earth's abundance and prosperity. Mango leaves are used to decorate idols and used in Hindu rituals. Garlands made with Mango leaves are used to decorate door and entry ways in many homes particularly on festival days. From Lord Ganesh to present day Indian, Mango remains the favorite fruit of all time, from green to fully ripe in any shape, color, texture, size or taste; Indians go crazy for Mango. Mango trees may not live thousands of years like Redwood trees of California, but some live up to 300 years still producing fruit.
Charcoal made from Mango trees are known to burn with high intensity heat without generating unnecessary smoke, this not to encourage burning Mango trees to make coal.
Indians are capable of making a tasty curry out of anything that grows from the ground that is edible (sometimes inedible too, that's a different story for the future). Green Mango with its sour taste serves as a base for various chutneys and pickles of all kinds and when cooked as a vegetable with various pulses (small legumes) its sour taste raises taste buds to new tantalizing levels. Indian immigrants travelled to various parts of the globe over the last century carried their favorite fruit Mango, spreading its roots or say its fruits all over the world where an appropriate climate allows its growth. At one of the Mango growing regions in South India, during the peak Mango season to handle the glut of Mango fruit, the juicy pulp is sun dried in layers to form a thick layered slab in a way no other fruit in the world is preserved in its natural flavor. Small pieces of 'Mango Slab' are sold as fruit snack. While eating a piece of Mango Slab, each layer of dried mango pulp separates and dissolves in the mouth with all its flavor and sweetness. Now that's a real fruit snack to bite on.
Over 1000 varieties of Mango are in cultivation where climate is favorable for its growth. Agricultural researchers all over the world are working to grow Mango to make it more resistant to diseases and pests and respond to various growth conditions with bountiful of harvest.
Julie Mango is a sought after Mango variety in the Caribbean. Several households in Trinidad have Julie Mango tree in their backyard. Mr. Diljohn was fortunate one to have a Julie Mango tree in his backyard. Every Mango season, he protects the tree from thieves set out to steal its fruits. Juggernaut had the opportunity of working with Diljohn in the chemistry lab where Diljohn was the senior lab tech in charge of making chemical reagents and setting up the apparatus for the students. At the end of each lab, Diljohn would give few slices of fully ripe Julie Mango with sweet juice oozing out to the three teaching assistants but he singles out Juggernaut to take home two fruits as a gesture of friendship. This he did for 5 years when Juggernaut worked as a teaching assistant at the chemistry lab. The other two teaching assistants both from England got jealous and one day with boldface asked Diljohn for this disparity. "Well, Julie Mango was brought from India and Juggernaut is from India and loves Mango, so he gets the additional treatment," said Diljohn with straight face. And they never complained and settled for few slices of Julie Mango. Though Diljon's Mango fruit was always sweet, his personnel life was anything but sweet, he was a gambling addict; addicted to betting on horse racing. Failed to wane him from his gambling addiction, his wife and two kids left him for Canada. Juggernaut noticed in the lab that Diljohn wrapped his Mangoes to ripen fast with news papers always from horse racing section, apparently the only section of the papers he saved. When he was not preparing reagents or servicing the lab equipment, he was busy checking race sheet for betting. At lunchtime he will go to a nearby betting joint at Curepe junction to place bets and wait the rest of the day for the results. While he lost some and won some bets, the taste of his Julie Mango was consistently sweet. Enjoying the taste of Diljohn's Julie Mango in the backroom while students were busy in the lab was an unforgettable event for Juggernaut even after 35 years.
British brought Mangoes and Mongoose to Jamaica, the later to control the snake population. Though Mango fruit is relished by all Jamaicans, Mongoose became a pest now, robbing live poultry from the farmers' since there were no snakes left on the island to feed.
Several years ago, Juggernaut was driving on Clarendon Plains in Jamaica, all of a sudden, his mother in the passenger seat screamed "stop, stop stop." Juggernaut applied brakes to stop the car suddenly only to hear her mother say "look those Mango trees." "Yeah, what about them?" "The entire route has Mango trees on both side of the road" replied irritated Juggernaut. "Go and fetch some green Mangoes." She was amazed at the roadside Mango trees that were planted more for its shade than fruit. "If it was back home, none of the fruits would reach thus far in size before somebody steals them," wondered his mother looking at the fully grown green Mangoes in her hands." "These people are crazy for not picking them," she said. Juggernaut wondered whether his mother was crazy to get excited to see green Mangoes hanging from roadside trees or the local people who don't really care for green Mangoes."
The market for worldwide demand for Mango is now large enough for members of the Chicago Board of Commodities Market to take notice. Like Oranges, Cocoa, Coffee and Tea, Mango should be traded on the Commodities Features Market. Just imagine big temperature drop during Mango flowering season means less fruit and a huge price hike for the fruit. There is serious money to be made on Mango trading on the commodities market.
Mango Chutney became a fashionable dip in American culinary lexicon in recent years. Once Mango gets on the commodities market, its production from Florida to Chile and from Africa to Asia, would reach new heights. Mango will be the king of Fruits making money for Investors spreading sweet Mango jam on hot toast for breakfast.




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