Welcome Visitor: Login to the siteJoin the site



Alternative words for writers


Submitted:Jan 24, 2012    Reads: 132    Comments: 40    Likes: 5   


Alternatives for said and asked

quizzed

inquired

questioned

begged

pleaded

pressed

implored

answered

agreed

admitted

responded

replied

stated

told

commented

pointed out

instructed

exclaimed

explained

elaborated

noted

mentioned

insisted

persisted

whispered

muttered

murmured

mumbled

stuttered

stammered

babbled

whined

complained

contradicted

gibbered

chattered

chirped

snarled

growled

grunted

hissed

threatened

rasped

snapped

scolded

snorted

blamed

implied

refused

declined

boasted

bragged

reassured

encouraged

concluded

deduced

observed

recalled

reminded

chimed in

interrupted

cut in

contributed

interjected

smarted off

teased

retorted

challenged

declared

announced

commanded

ordered

shouted

hollered

yelled

demanded

called out

cried/ cry out

shrieked

squealed

squawked

screamed

screeched

thundered

raved

ranted

lashed out

raged

bellowed

retaliated

-

Tip:

To break up the monotony of the "he said, she said," try inserting action.

Example:

The other man cupped his hands and lit a cigarette, then flashed Merrick a smile over crooked, yellow teeth. "Don't worry. ..." He blew smoke in Merrick's direction. "I got what you came for. The question is," -- he took another drag -- "do you have what I came for?"

-

-

A list of my favorite quirky words

skedaddle

bamboozled

shmooze

brouhaha

lollygagged

frocus

absconded

shenanigans

conundrum

hoodwinked

flummox

scuttle

amble (amble along)

schmuck

schlemiel

glib

dastardly

duped

amuck

dregs

smithereens

supercilious

chagrin

curmudgeon

gumption

macabre

nary (a word)

smarts (that smarts)

hijinks

moxie

-

Examples of accents and slang

alla: all of

toldja: told you

wanta/wanna: want to

don'tcha: don't you

can'tcha: can't you

kinda: kind of

how'd: how did

gonna: going to

watcha: what you

offa: off of

didja: did ya

tellya: tell you

tryna: trying to

letcha: let you

coupla: couple of

willya: will you

wuddya :what do you

hellja: hell did you

lemme: let me

oughta: ought to

gimme: give me

musta: must have

dunno: don't know

shoulda: should have

c'mon: come on

'bout: about

'em: them

'im: him

'er: her

s'pect: suspect

mon: man (Jamaican, etc)

din: then (Jamaican, North American hillbilly, etc.)

dat: that (Jamaican, North American hillbilly, etc.)

boid: bird (Brooklyn)

joik: jerk (Brooklyn)

-

Tip (accent):

You can hyphenate a letter and a word when writing a character's accent.

Example:

"That there buzzard came outta nowheres, a-swoopin' and a-squawkin' - like he owned the place!"

Tip:

The same technique can be used to create a stutter.

Example:

"S-sorry, Mr. Pr-Price. I'm n-n-not feel-feeling up to v-visiting the wax museum ruh-right now. M-maybe later."

Tip (accent):

You can also drop a letter and add an apostrophe.

Example:

"I ain't doin' nothin' much today, so I can get ta workin' on that truck now -- if'n ya wants me to."

Or you can do away with the letter and apostrophe altogether.

"I ain't doin nothin much today, so I can get ta workin on that truck now -- if'n ya wants me to."

-

A handy little tool

The Slang Dictionary

-

Some beatnik slang

Actor: Show-off

Agitate the gravel: To leave

Are you writing a book?: You're asking too many questions

Baby: Cute girl, term of address for either sex

Back seat bingo: Necking in a car

Bad news: Depressing person

Bent eight: a V-8 engine (hot-rodders)

Big Daddy: An older person

Big tickle: Really funny

Bit: An act

Blast: A good time

Blow off: To defeat in a race (hot-rodders)

Bobbed: Shortened

Boss: Great

Bread: Money

Burn rubber: To accelerate hard and fast (hot-rodders)

Cast an eyeball: To look

Cat: A hip person (Beats)

Chariot: Car (Beats)

Chrome-plated: Dressed up (hot-rodders, originally)

Circled: Married

Classy chassis: Great body

Cloud 9: Really happy

Clutched: Rejected

Clyde: Term of address, usually for a normal person (Beats)

Cook, cookin': Doing it well

Cool it: Relax, settle down

Cooties: Imaginary infestations of the truly un-cool

Cranked: Excited (Beats)

Crazy "Like crazy,man": Implies an especially good thing

Cream: Originally, to dent a car. Later, to badly damage

Cruisin' for a bruisin': Looking for trouble

Cube: A normal person

Cut the gas: Be quiet!

Cut out: Leave

Daddy-O: Term of address (Beats)

Dibs: A claim - as in "got dibs" on that seat

Dig: To understand; to approve

Dolly: Cute girl

Don't have a cow: Don't get so excited

Earthbound: Reliable

Epistle: Letter

Eyeball: Look around

Fake Out: A bad date

Fast: Someone who was sexually active

Fat City: A great thing or place; Happy

Flat out: Fast as you can

Flat-top: A man's hairstyle that is flat across the top.

Flick: A movie

Flip: To get very excited

Floor it: Push the accelerator to the floor

Fracture: To amuse

Fream: Someone who doesn't fit in

Frosted: Angry

The fuzz: The cops

Get Bent!: Disparaging remark as in "drop dead"

Get with it: Understand

Gig: Work, job

Go ape: Get very excited

Goof: Someone who makes mistakes

Goopy: Messy

Greaser: A guy with tons of grease in his hair

Green: New, inexperienced

Grody: Sloppy, messy or dirty

Hang: As in "hang out" which means to do very little

Haul ass: Drive very fast

Heat: Police

Hip/ Hep: Someone who is cool, in the know. Very good.

Hipster: Same as above

Horn: Telephone

Hottie: A very fast car (hot-rodders)

Illuminations: Good ideas, thoughts

In orbit: In the know

Ivy Leaguer: Pants style. Also any person who attended an Ivy League college

Jacked Up: Car with raised rear end.

Jacketed: Going steady.

Jets Smarts: brains

Kick: A fun or good thing; Also, a fad

Kill: To really impress

Knuckle sandwich: A fist in the face

Kookie Nuts: in the nicest possible was

Lay a patch: To accelerate so rapidly that you leave a patch of rubber on the road.

Lay on: To give (Beats)

Machine: A car (hot-rodders)

Made in the shade: Success guaranteed

Make out: A kissing session

Make the scene: To attend an event or activity

Nerd: Same as now.

Nod: Drift off to sleep

No sweat: No problem

Nuggets: Loose change

Odd ball: Someone a bit off the norm

On the stick: Pulled together. Bright, prepared...

Pad: Home

Paper shaker: Cheerleader or Pom Pom girl

Party pooper: No fun at all

Passion Pit: Drive-in movie theatre

Peepers: Glasses

Pile up Z's: Get some sleep

Pound: Beat up

Radioactive: Very popular

Rap: To tattle on someone (Beats)

Rattle your cage: Get upset

Raunchy: Messy or gross in some other way

Razz my berries: Excite or impress me

Real gone: Very much in love. Also unstable.

Rock: A diamond

Scream: Go fast

Shoot low: Be careful

Shot down: Failed

Sing: To tattle or inform on some

Action: What's happening

Axe: Any musical instrument,any tool you use to make your living

Baby: Term of endearment,applied to men or women

Bobo: Generic

Bread: Money

Butch: Someone who tags along or bums too much

Cruise: To leave,split,take off

City: Suffix used for emphasis(That scene was drag-city)

Cool it: Relax,calm down,chill

Chick: A cool female,babe

Crash: To stay over

Crash out: To fall asleep,pass out

Dig: Understand,look or listen to,pay attention,to like something

Drag: Come-down,disappointment

Flip out: Go nuts over

Hipster: One who is cool,and a part of the scene

All that jazz: All that is good,the rest of something

Jive: Offensive,no good

Kat-A cool male

Later: Goodbye,forget it

The Man: Police

The Most: Greatest,furthest out

Pad: Home or other residence,crib

Put on: To string along a square who's not aware of being teased

Shag: To have sex

Short: The last few drags of a cigarette or joint

Smell: Good,cool

Square: Un-hip,one who's not cool.L7

The whole loaf: Very good,awesome,hip

Two heels and a bag of stank: Not good, shitty, stank.

Wig out: To get very excited,freak out

A Hughie Lewis: A hip square,a square who thinks they're hip

Elvis food: Really good food that's probably bad for you

86: To delete,do away with

-

Tip:

Like accents, slang can help separate characters that are engaged in dialogue. Using slang and accents will help reduce the writer's dependency on words like said and asked.

Tip:

When it comes to slang don't over do it. Slang changes with each generation. Use it too often in a modern piece, and you may find that your work has become "outdated" rather quickly.

Note: A lot of the beatnik definitions were gathered from the Internet. I've personally found it difficult to locate good sites that have slang and accent info for creative writers.





5

| Email this story Email this Miscellaneous | Add to reading list



Reviews

About | News | Contact | Your Account | TheNextBigWriter | Self Publishing | Advertise

© 2013 TheNextBigWriter, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Terms under which this service is provided to you. Privacy Policy.