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Butterfly And Angel Wings

Book By: booksbyfay
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This book is essays about grandmothers, mothers and single women born early in the twentieth century. Hard working, faith filled, courageous women, each with a story to tell.


Submitted:Aug 11, 2008    Reads: 111    Comments: 0    Likes: 0   


Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelings with us, she'd have said the unlucky day in her life was the day she lost her best friend, her husband.
Her nursing home years were tough times and a mixture of long ago memories that made for pleasant daydreams. Memories that took her back to times, she liked better in her life.
The young nurse who invited this woman to her wedding nicknamed her Shorty, because she was small in stature. Shorty received a wedding invitation just like all the nurse's other friends and relatives. The first thing she thought was that she wouldn't be able to attend. The invitation was a wasted effort.
That's where she was wrong. One CNA bought a wedding gift and card for Shorty to give the bride and groom. The CNA even helped the little lady wrap the gift. A nurse and the Director of Nurses took Shorty shopping to find her a special dress for the occasion. Those two kind women saw to it that Shorty attended the wedding and reception. The bride saw to it her wheelchair was at the front of the church in a place of honor. Shorty felt as if she was in a dream come true. She couldn't believe her good fortune to be able to be there. It always mystified her why so many people bothered to be kind to her.
Another young woman, who worked in the nursing home laundry, visited Shorty on a regular basis. She joined Shorty for the Mother Daughter Tea as well as other family events and activities. This friend had a baby boy. Shorty watched the child change from an infant to a toddler. He grew to love Shorty just as much as the rest of us did and was thrilled to be with her. Shorty was filled with pride as any grandmother would be. She regaled the nursing home CNAs with stories told to her by the young woman about the little boy, his first words, his first step and cute antics. The young mother and her baby had become Shorty's family.
Right up to the last days of her life, Shorty, though physically frail, had a sharp mind. To stave off forgetfulness and confusion, she repeatedly chanted the things that were important to her to remember. She'd tell us her roommate's full name and the name of the CNAs helping her. Then she'd look up at the wedding picture on the wall and say the bride and groom's name. She'd tell us her friend was married.
We'd say, "You know because you were at the wedding."
Each time, her dark eyes sparkled. A shy smile spread across her face. She simply responded, "Yes."
What would she have said if we asked her if the Friday the thirteen that she died was unlucky for her?
With a throaty chuckle and a sideways nod of her head, she'd have said in her direct manner, "No, because it was Good Friday."
She would have been right. The day she died was also Good Friday. The only unlucky ones that day were all of her friends who had to say good-bye.
For the legacy of love, this courageous soul taught all those whose lives she touched, her epithet should be
When my life on earth is done
It will be my final plea,
Let someone somewhere think or say
"You made a difference to me."

Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelings with us, she'd have said the unlucky day in her life was the day she lost her best friend, her husband.
Her nursing home years were tough times and a mixture of long ago memories that made for pleasant daydreams. Memories that took her back to times, she liked better in her life.
The young nurse who invited this woman to her wedding nicknamed her Shorty, because she was small in stature. Shorty received a wedding invitation just like all the nurse's other friends and relatives. The first thing she thought was that she wouldn't be able to attend. The invitation was a wasted effort.
That's where she was wrong. One CNA bought a wedding gift and card for Shorty to give the bride and groom. The CNA even helped the little lady wrap the gift. A nurse and the Director of Nurses took Shorty shopping to find her a special dress for the occasion. Those two kind women saw to it that Shorty attended the wedding and reception. The bride saw to it her wheelchair was at the front of the church in a place of honor. Shorty felt as if she was in a dream come true. She couldn't believe her good fortune to be able to be there. It always mystified her why so many people bothered to be kind to her.
Another young woman, who worked in the nursing home laundry, visited Shorty on a regular basis. She joined Shorty for the Mother Daughter Tea as well as other family events and activities. This friend had a baby boy. Shorty watched the child change from an infant to a toddler. He grew to love Shorty just as much as the rest of us did and was thrilled to be with her. Shorty was filled with pride as any grandmother would be. She regaled the nursing home CNAs with stories told to her by the young woman about the little boy, his first words, his first step and cute antics. The young mother and her baby had become Shorty's family.
Right up to the last days of her life, Shorty, though physically frail, had a sharp mind. To stave off forgetfulness and confusion, she repeatedly chanted the things that were important to her to remember. She'd tell us her roommate's full name and the name of the CNAs helping her. Then she'd look up at the wedding picture on the wall and say the bride and groom's name. She'd tell us her friend was married.
We'd say, "You know because you were at the wedding."
Each time, her dark eyes sparkled. A shy smile spread across her face. She simply responded, "Yes."
What would she have said if we asked her if the Friday the thirteen that she died was unlucky for her?
With a throaty chuckle and a sideways nod of her head, she'd have said in her direct manner, "No, because it was Good Friday."
She would have been right. The day she died was also Good Friday. The only unlucky ones that day were all of her friends who had to say good-bye.
For the legacy of love, this courageous soul taught all those whose lives she touched, her epithet should be
When my life on earth is done
It will be my final plea,
Let someone somewhere think or say
"You made a difference to me."

Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelings with us, she'd have said the unlucky day in her life was the day she lost her best friend, her husband.
Her nursing home years were tough times and a mixture of long ago memories that made for pleasant daydreams. Memories that took her back to times, she liked better in her life.
The young nurse who invited this woman to her wedding nicknamed her Shorty, because she was small in stature. Shorty received a wedding invitation just like all the nurse's other friends and relatives. The first thing she thought was that she wouldn't be able to attend. The invitation was a wasted effort.
That's where she was wrong. One CNA bought a wedding gift and card for Shorty to give the bride and groom. The CNA even helped the little lady wrap the gift. A nurse and the Director of Nurses took Shorty shopping to find her a special dress for the occasion. Those two kind women saw to it that Shorty attended the wedding and reception. The bride saw to it her wheelchair was at the front of the church in a place of honor. Shorty felt as if she was in a dream come true. She couldn't believe her good fortune to be able to be there. It always mystified her why so many people bothered to be kind to her.
Another young woman, who worked in the nursing home laundry, visited Shorty on a regular basis. She joined Shorty for the Mother Daughter Tea as well as other family events and activities. This friend had a baby boy. Shorty watched the child change from an infant to a toddler. He grew to love Shorty just as much as the rest of us did and was thrilled to be with her. Shorty was filled with pride as any grandmother would be. She regaled the nursing home CNAs with stories told to her by the young woman about the little boy, his first words, his first step and cute antics. The young mother and her baby had become Shorty's family.
Right up to the last days of her life, Shorty, though physically frail, had a sharp mind. To stave off forgetfulness and confusion, she repeatedly chanted the things that were important to her to remember. She'd tell us her roommate's full name and the name of the CNAs helping her. Then she'd look up at the wedding picture on the wall and say the bride and groom's name. She'd tell us her friend was married.
We'd say, "You know because you were at the wedding."
Each time, her dark eyes sparkled. A shy smile spread across her face. She simply responded, "Yes."
What would she have said if we asked her if the Friday the thirteen that she died was unlucky for her?
With a throaty chuckle and a sideways nod of her head, she'd have said in her direct manner, "No, because it was Good Friday."
She would have been right. The day she died was also Good Friday. The only unlucky ones that day were all of her friends who had to say good-bye.
For the legacy of love, this courageous soul taught all those whose lives she touched, her epithet should be
When my life on earth is done
It will be my final plea,
Let someone somewhere think or say
"You made a difference to me."

Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelings with us, she'd have said the unlucky day in her life was the day she lost her best friend, her husband.
Her nursing home years were tough times and a mixture of long ago memories that made for pleasant daydreams. Memories that took her back to times, she liked better in her life.
The young nurse who invited this woman to her wedding nicknamed her Shorty, because she was small in stature. Shorty received a wedding invitation just like all the nurse's other friends and relatives. The first thing she thought was that she wouldn't be able to attend. The invitation was a wasted effort.
That's where she was wrong. One CNA bought a wedding gift and card for Shorty to give the bride and groom. The CNA even helped the little lady wrap the gift. A nurse and the Director of Nurses took Shorty shopping to find her a special dress for the occasion. Those two kind women saw to it that Shorty attended the wedding and reception. The bride saw to it her wheelchair was at the front of the church in a place of honor. Shorty felt as if she was in a dream come true. She couldn't believe her good fortune to be able to be there. It always mystified her why so many people bothered to be kind to her.
Another young woman, who worked in the nursing home laundry, visited Shorty on a regular basis. She joined Shorty for the Mother Daughter Tea as well as other family events and activities. This friend had a baby boy. Shorty watched the child change from an infant to a toddler. He grew to love Shorty just as much as the rest of us did and was thrilled to be with her. Shorty was filled with pride as any grandmother would be. She regaled the nursing home CNAs with stories told to her by the young woman about the little boy, his first words, his first step and cute antics. The young mother and her baby had become Shorty's family.
Right up to the last days of her life, Shorty, though physically frail, had a sharp mind. To stave off forgetfulness and confusion, she repeatedly chanted the things that were important to her to remember. She'd tell us her roommate's full name and the name of the CNAs helping her. Then she'd look up at the wedding picture on the wall and say the bride and groom's name. She'd tell us her friend was married.
We'd say, "You know because you were at the wedding."
Each time, her dark eyes sparkled. A shy smile spread across her face. She simply responded, "Yes."
What would she have said if we asked her if the Friday the thirteen that she died was unlucky for her?
With a throaty chuckle and a sideways nod of her head, she'd have said in her direct manner, "No, because it was Good Friday."
She would have been right. The day she died was also Good Friday. The only unlucky ones that day were all of her friends who had to say good-bye.
For the legacy of love, this courageous soul taught all those whose lives she touched, her epithet should be
When my life on earth is done
It will be my final plea,
Let someone somewhere think or say
"You made a difference to me."

Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelings with us, she'd have said the unlucky day in her life was the day she lost her best friend, her husband.
Her nursing home years were tough times and a mixture of long ago memories that made for pleasant daydreams. Memories that took her back to times, she liked better in her life.
The young nurse who invited this woman to her wedding nicknamed her Shorty, because she was small in stature. Shorty received a wedding invitation just like all the nurse's other friends and relatives. The first thing she thought was that she wouldn't be able to attend. The invitation was a wasted effort.
That's where she was wrong. One CNA bought a wedding gift and card for Shorty to give the bride and groom. The CNA even helped the little lady wrap the gift. A nurse and the Director of Nurses took Shorty shopping to find her a special dress for the occasion. Those two kind women saw to it that Shorty attended the wedding and reception. The bride saw to it her wheelchair was at the front of the church in a place of honor. Shorty felt as if she was in a dream come true. She couldn't believe her good fortune to be able to be there. It always mystified her why so many people bothered to be kind to her.
Another young woman, who worked in the nursing home laundry, visited Shorty on a regular basis. She joined Shorty for the Mother Daughter Tea as well as other family events and activities. This friend had a baby boy. Shorty watched the child change from an infant to a toddler. He grew to love Shorty just as much as the rest of us did and was thrilled to be with her. Shorty was filled with pride as any grandmother would be. She regaled the nursing home CNAs with stories told to her by the young woman about the little boy, his first words, his first step and cute antics. The young mother and her baby had become Shorty's family.
Right up to the last days of her life, Shorty, though physically frail, had a sharp mind. To stave off forgetfulness and confusion, she repeatedly chanted the things that were important to her to remember. She'd tell us her roommate's full name and the name of the CNAs helping her. Then she'd look up at the wedding picture on the wall and say the bride and groom's name. She'd tell us her friend was married.
We'd say, "You know because you were at the wedding."
Each time, her dark eyes sparkled. A shy smile spread across her face. She simply responded, "Yes."
What would she have said if we asked her if the Friday the thirteen that she died was unlucky for her?
With a throaty chuckle and a sideways nod of her head, she'd have said in her direct manner, "No, because it was Good Friday."
She would have been right. The day she died was also Good Friday. The only unlucky ones that day were all of her friends who had to say good-bye.
For the legacy of love, this courageous soul taught all those whose lives she touched, her epithet should be
When my life on earth is done
It will be my final plea,
Let someone somewhere think or say
"You made a difference to me."

Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelings with us, she'd have said the unlucky day in her life was the day she lost her best friend, her husband.
Her nursing home years were tough times and a mixture of long ago memories that made for pleasant daydreams. Memories that took her back to times, she liked better in her life.
The young nurse who invited this woman to her wedding nicknamed her Shorty, because she was small in stature. Shorty received a wedding invitation just like all the nurse's other friends and relatives. The first thing she thought was that she wouldn't be able to attend. The invitation was a wasted effort.
That's where she was wrong. One CNA bought a wedding gift and card for Shorty to give the bride and groom. The CNA even helped the little lady wrap the gift. A nurse and the Director of Nurses took Shorty shopping to find her a special dress for the occasion. Those two kind women saw to it that Shorty attended the wedding and reception. The bride saw to it her wheelchair was at the front of the church in a place of honor. Shorty felt as if she was in a dream come true. She couldn't believe her good fortune to be able to be there. It always mystified her why so many people bothered to be kind to her.
Another young woman, who worked in the nursing home laundry, visited Shorty on a regular basis. She joined Shorty for the Mother Daughter Tea as well as other family events and activities. This friend had a baby boy. Shorty watched the child change from an infant to a toddler. He grew to love Shorty just as much as the rest of us did and was thrilled to be with her. Shorty was filled with pride as any grandmother would be. She regaled the nursing home CNAs with stories told to her by the young woman about the little boy, his first words, his first step and cute antics. The young mother and her baby had become Shorty's family.
Right up to the last days of her life, Shorty, though physically frail, had a sharp mind. To stave off forgetfulness and confusion, she repeatedly chanted the things that were important to her to remember. She'd tell us her roommate's full name and the name of the CNAs helping her. Then she'd look up at the wedding picture on the wall and say the bride and groom's name. She'd tell us her friend was married.
We'd say, "You know because you were at the wedding."
Each time, her dark eyes sparkled. A shy smile spread across her face. She simply responded, "Yes."
What would she have said if we asked her if the Friday the thirteen that she died was unlucky for her?
With a throaty chuckle and a sideways nod of her head, she'd have said in her direct manner, "No, because it was Good Friday."
She would have been right. The day she died was also Good Friday. The only unlucky ones that day were all of her friends who had to say good-bye.
For the legacy of love, this courageous soul taught all those whose lives she touched, her epithet should be
When my life on earth is done
It will be my final plea,
Let someone somewhere think or say
"You made a difference to me."

Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelings with us, she'd have said the unlucky day in her life was the day she lost her best friend, her husband.
Her nursing home years were tough times and a mixture of long ago memories that made for pleasant daydreams. Memories that took her back to times, she liked better in her life.
The young nurse who invited this woman to her wedding nicknamed her Shorty, because she was small in stature. Shorty received a wedding invitation just like all the nurse's other friends and relatives. The first thing she thought was that she wouldn't be able to attend. The invitation was a wasted effort.
That's where she was wrong. One CNA bought a wedding gift and card for Shorty to give the bride and groom. The CNA even helped the little lady wrap the gift. A nurse and the Director of Nurses took Shorty shopping to find her a special dress for the occasion. Those two kind women saw to it that Shorty attended the wedding and reception. The bride saw to it her wheelchair was at the front of the church in a place of honor. Shorty felt as if she was in a dream come true. She couldn't believe her good fortune to be able to be there. It always mystified her why so many people bothered to be kind to her.
Another young woman, who worked in the nursing home laundry, visited Shorty on a regular basis. She joined Shorty for the Mother Daughter Tea as well as other family events and activities. This friend had a baby boy. Shorty watched the child change from an infant to a toddler. He grew to love Shorty just as much as the rest of us did and was thrilled to be with her. Shorty was filled with pride as any grandmother would be. She regaled the nursing home CNAs with stories told to her by the young woman about the little boy, his first words, his first step and cute antics. The young mother and her baby had become Shorty's family.
Right up to the last days of her life, Shorty, though physically frail, had a sharp mind. To stave off forgetfulness and confusion, she repeatedly chanted the things that were important to her to remember. She'd tell us her roommate's full name and the name of the CNAs helping her. Then she'd look up at the wedding picture on the wall and say the bride and groom's name. She'd tell us her friend was married.
We'd say, "You know because you were at the wedding."
Each time, her dark eyes sparkled. A shy smile spread across her face. She simply responded, "Yes."
What would she have said if we asked her if the Friday the thirteen that she died was unlucky for her?
With a throaty chuckle and a sideways nod of her head, she'd have said in her direct manner, "No, because it was Good Friday."
She would have been right. The day she died was also Good Friday. The only unlucky ones that day were all of her friends who had to say good-bye.
For the legacy of love, this courageous soul taught all those whose lives she touched, her epithet should be
When my life on earth is done
It will be my final plea,
Let someone somewhere think or say
"You made a difference to me."

Shorty
At 92 years old, Shorty died on Friday the thirteenth. Frail and wispy, she was a woman of few words. She wore her hair drawn back into a small braid coiled on top her head and held with a butterfly clip that fluttered when she nodded. The butterfly looked for all the world like it was going to take flight at any moment.
That butterfly was one of two pretty things that Shorty owned. After all, this frugal woman lived through wars and the Great Depression. The other item was a new, dark red dress, she wore to a friend's wedding a few months before. This dress was a reminder of the fun time she had when two friends took her shopping for the last time.
Shorty had no surveyors for she had outlived her immediate family. Her husband passed away years ago, and she didn't have children which was too bad. She would have made a good mother.
Though she outlived the friends of her younger days, Shorty did have friends. Through the later years, she had drawn them to her like butterflies are drawn to milkweed nectar. The friends of her later years weren't attracted to her as a companion or confidant. Rather the reason was because of her stoic courage, and gritty determination to keep going without complaints no matter what happened to her. Shorty managed to bring out kindness and love in everyone she met, especially her many caregivers.
The number of people who attended her funeral was thirteen, but none of them felt anything but glad that they could pay their last respects. These friends felt lucky to have known her. Pleasant memories they shared fluttered around her casket as if carried on the wings of her freed butterfly.
One friend remembered she loved all flowers so much she refused to mow her lawn in the spring until the dandelions and wild violets had bloomed. What anyone else considered a weed patch, her lawn was a picture of beauty in her opinion.
The minister said he had just walked past Shorty's house. He noticed the resurrection lilies had sprung up. He thought of Shorty when he saw those flowers. The lilies' green leaves would soon die. In no time in their place would be the resurrection of beautiful pink flowers. He felt Shorty was like that. She had lived and died. One day she will be resurrected to Heaven just like her lilies. There she will no longer be in need of a fluttering butterfly in her hair. She will have wings of her own.
One friend remarked Shorty's husband had been gone twenty one years. Those were years she had to live alone. When she had to give up her home, because she could no longer live by herself she could have considered that an unlucky day. Then there was the day she had to leave her friend's home to move into a nursing home, because she could no long take care of herself. Loosing a leg was the saddest of times for her, but all her friends would agree if we could have gotten her to share her feelin




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