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The Day of The Triffids

Book review By: writingjay
Science fiction


The story is set in a post-apocalyptic world. Everyone goes blind, now it is up to Masen to save the others.


Submitted:Nov 1, 2011    Reads: 21    Comments: 1    Likes: 1   


The Day of the Triffids

The title of the book I read is, "The Day of The Triffids." This book was written by John Wyndham, and was published in the year 1951. When it first came out, just like all of the other books he published, it gained a lot of fame for its fantastic sci-fi ideas. Later, the book was made into a movie in the year 1962, which also gained a lot of attention. Interestingly enough, Wyndham was both a scientist and an author. According to some researches, his friends from the early 1900's mention how dedicated and motivated he was towards making new inventions and re-writing history.

The book is set in a post-apocalyptic world, which is ruled by deadly and poisonous plants called, "Triffids". Before the Triffids appear and starts to devastate the planet, a huge meteorite-like object shines in the sky. The next morning, everyone who had saw the light had gone blind. Of course, our protagonists, and antagonists of the story are the people who could see. The two main protagonists are, "Bill Masen," and "Josella" who coincidentally meets on a street. Later they end up finding more survivors who have escaped from the triffids out into the wild, and starts to make a new community with new rules and policies.

There are two versions of this book, but the version I read was mainly targeted for young-adolescents. The original copy of the book was targeted for older adults, due to its complicated twist of words, and literary terms. As I said before, Philip was very famous for his new revolutionized ideas, which even impacted the real world. However, when people look at this book, including me, they all figured out that Philips's books had abrupt endings and confusing relationships between paragraphs, because he had trouble with expressing and writing down his ideas onto paper.

After finishing the book, I realized that the author put his view of the world, by using setting, and other literary terms such as plot, so the reader could indirectly figure out what it was that he was trying to say. One of the points that he wanted us to understand through his words were, "if mankind continue down the path that they have chosen, they will perish." To show this message, he mentions all sorts of merciless experiments that mankind have pulled off on plants and different lifeforms, later, these "plants and different lifeforms" starts to evolve in a supernatural way, in which later they become a deadly walking plant.

There was also the theme and the message of the reader in the book. Personally, I think the main theme of the book was, "Believe in your self," and "Trust in yourself." In the book, the author wanted to emphasize the sudden terror of everyone becoming helpless on their own. To emphasize this emotional impact, Wyndham puts in a group of people who start

He wanted to questions us on how we would react in these kinds of situations where you are all on your own, and there are enemies all around you. In the later half of the book he gives us an appropriate answer, which was to, "Believe in yourself."





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