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ADOLESCENT ADJUSTMENT TO HIGHER SCONDARY SCHOOL

Book review By: priyanka singh
Young adult



In this study show the Adolescence adjustment characterized as a period of change, not only in terms of individual physical and cognitive development, but also in terms of the changes that occur in the adolescents’ social contexts. In this period offers special challenges and opportunities for developmental researchers to examine the relationship between individual development and contextual changes. That many Uttar Pradesh children face is the transition from secondary school. ...........


Submitted:Sep 21, 2012    Reads: 190    Comments: 1    Likes: 0   


Adolescent Adjustment to Higher Transition Uttar Pradesh in Meerut city

By

Dr.Indu Bansal (HOD)

Priyanka Singh (Rrsearch Scholar)

Human Development

Banasthali University

(Rajasthan) 304022

Abstract

The study investigated the differences between adolescent adjustments to the higher secondary school transition. Total samples consisted of 196 ten school students with 84 (43%) boys and 112 (51%) girls. The five middle schools randomly sleeted in Meerut city. The data were analysis by mean and sd. the analysis t-tests were used to evaluate the differences in boys and girls adjustment to middle school. The findings showed that girls adjusted to the academic and social characteristics of the middle school transition than boys. One particular analysis revealed that girls from less adjusted to making friends than boys Overall, this and other findings indicate that gender can affect the transitional experiences of adolescents. They also warrant the need to develop an awareness of the possible transitional difficulties for middle school boys and girls.

Key Words: Adjustment, Middle school, Transition,

Dr. Bansal I., and Singh, P. (2012) Adolescent Adjustment to the secondary School Transition Uttar Pradesh in Meerut city

Introduction

Adolescence has been defined as a crucial period of cognitive, psychosocial, and emotional transformations. One of the most influential determinants of adolescent success with these negotiations is family structure. An exhaustive review of recent research showed that family structure determines adolescents' academic and social development. In particular, family structure bears important implications on adolescents' abilities to lead a successful navigation through school and into adulthood.

That indicated 88% of all students experience academic and social difficulties with the middle school transition. According to Anderman and Kimweli (1997), students face difficulties with transitional tasks such as (a) getting to class on time, (b) finding lockers, (c) keeping up with materials, (d) finding lunchrooms and bathrooms, (e) getting on the right bus to go home, (f) getting through the crowded halls, and (g) remembering which class to go to next.

The transition from elementary school to secondary school involves major environmental changes for students-changes that may tax students' sense of personal efficacy and competence. Typically, this transition involves moving from small elementary schools to larger secondary schools, with concomitant changes in teachers' support and changes in students' academic, personal, and interpersonal functioning. Adolescents move from a personalized school environment of familiar peers to a new and more demanding milieu. Students have to reestablish their identities, including their sense of efficacy, social connectedness, and academic status within an enlarged, heterogeneous network of new peers and multiple teachers in rotating class sessions. Thus, this period is marked some loss of personal competence, control, and self-confidence for adjusting to middle school.

Objective

  • To study the differences between adolescent adjustment to the secondary school transition of adolescents.
  • To study that girl adjusted to the academic and social characteristics of the secondary school transition than boys.

Delimitations of the study

  • The study was delimited to Meerut city in Uttar Pradesh schools.
  • Will be sleeted only secondary schools boys and girls students.
  • Five secondary schools randomly sleeted schools included in the study.

Methodology

For the present study adolescent adjustment to the secondary school transition Uttar Pradesh in Meerut city. Will be sleeted only secondary schools boys and girls students. Total samples consisted of 196 secondary school students with 84 (43%) boys and 112 (51%) girls. Data were drawn from five secondary schools randomly sleeted in Meerut city schools.

Data Analysis

The data were analysis by mean and sd. the analysis t-tests were used to evaluate the differences in boys and girls adjustment to secondary school.

Results

Academic Adjustment to Middle School

Aggregate data showed statistically significant differences between male participants' and female participants' academic adjustment to secondary school (F = 4.36, p < .05). Adolescent girls reported higher levels of academic adjustment. Whereas girls reported higher levels of adjustment to having more class work (M = 4.17; SD = 1.12) and homework (M = 4.39; SD = 1.11), adolescent boys were not as adjusted to class work (M = 2.00; SD = 1.19) and homework (M = 3.20; SD = 1.10). Adolescent girls also reported high levels of adjustment to learning secondary school English (M = 4.19; SD = 1.24), while adolescent boys were not as adjusted to secondary school English (M = 2.49; SD = 1.21). In addition, adolescent girls were well adjusted to mathematics (M = 4.62; SD = 1.19), but boys were somewhat adjusted to secondary level mathematics (M = 3.40; SD = 1.15). However, boys' level of adjustment to learning physical education (M = 4.75; SD = 1.19) was higher than girls' adjustment to this course (M = 2.94; SD = 1.15).

Social Adjustment

Aggregate data showed statistically significant differences between male participants' and female participants' social adjustment to secondary school (F = 3.79, p < .05). Adolescent girls reported higher levels of social adjustment to 1 of 21 items. The female participants were well adjusted to attending a larger, crowded school (M = 4.32; SD = .93). The male participants, however, were only somewhat adjusted to this social characteristic (M = 3.40; SD = 1.12). Adolescent girls were more adjusted to dealing with peer pressure (M = 4.00; SD = 1.09) than were adolescent boys (M = 3.20; SD = 1.15). Both groups reported that they were somewhat adjusted to learning a new building (M = 3.39; Boys' SD = 1.06; Girls' SD = 1.23). Whereas adolescent girls indicated that they were well adjusted to following middle school rules (M = 4.79; SD =. 92), adolescent boys reported that they were nearly somewhat adjusted to secondary school rules (M = 2.90; SD = 1.18). However, more boys reported higher levels of adjustment than girls to making new friends of the same gender (M = 4.47; SD = 1.03; M = 2.13, SD = 1.28, respectively) and opposite gender (M = 4.01; SD = 1.16; M = 2.07; SD = 1.29, respectively).

Discussion

The findings from this study present impact on the secondary school transition. The findings reflect previous research's description of adolescent boys and girls' this research showed that adolescent girls from adjusted to the secondary school transition than were their male counterparts.

The findings about the social characteristics are similar to the results of the academic characteristics. The adolescent girls were more adjusted to more of the logistical and authoritative procedures than were adolescent boys. However, the boys were more adjusted to forming relationships with their peers than were the girls. This finding runs counter to the previous identification of the few friends and support systems for boys. In addition, this finding contradicts previous research that highlights girls' strong preferences for and skills in relationship building. Therefore, the author must partially reject hypothesis two.

They particularly indicated that the male students are somewhat struggling to make sense of secondary level class work and homework and English and mathematics. From a social perspective, to affect the adolescent boys' adjustment to a larger crowded school, peer pressure, and secondary school rules. Structured and non structured qualitative research could provide additional insight to and support for these quantitative-based conclusions.

Conclusion

The findings from this study showed that these adverse affects are evidenced clearly in the secondary school transition. In particular, boys and girls from appear to have different transitional experiences with their entry into secondary school. The male adolescent participants of this study experienced more struggles with the secondary school transition than did their female counterparts.

These finding suggest the need to increase secondary school leaders and parents' awareness of these difficulties. Secondary school students with assistance on adjusting to secondary school. However, school should have a counseling curriculum available for accommodating this potential need to students. This mechanism could address the possible gender and transitional difficulties of secondary school students.

References

Anderman, E., & Kimweli, D. (1997). Victimization and safety in schools serving early adolescents. J- Early Adolescence, 17(4), 408-438.

Barber, B., & Olsen, J. (2004). Assessing the transitions to middle and high school. J- Adolescent Research, 19, 3-30.

Dubois, D., & Burk-Braxton, et.al. (2002). Race and gender influences on adjustment to early adolescence: Investigation of an integrative model. J - Child Development, 73(5), 1573-1592.

Hirsch, B., & DuBois, D. (1991). Self esteem in early adolescence: The identification and prediction of contrasting longitudinal trajectories. J- Youth and Adolescence. 20(1), 53-72.

Odegaard, S., & Heath, J. (1992). Assisting the elementary school student in the transition to a middle level school. J- Middle School. 24(2), 21-25.

Pintrich, P. (2003). A motivational science perspective on the role of student motivation in learning and teaching contexts. J- Educational Psychology. 95, 667-686.

Correspondence to:

Dr. Indu Bansal, Head of the Department of Home science, Banasthali University BANASTHALI (RAJASTHAN) INDIA

Authors' affiliations:

Priyanka Singh, Department of Human Development, Banasthali University BANASTHALI (RAJASTHAN) INDIA

Emailed- priyanka23.1987@gmail.com





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