Namor De Nacirema

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Poetry  |  House: Booksie Classic
Aphorism on repeating history.

Submitted: May 04, 2016

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Submitted: May 04, 2016

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Here, shown in the form of a decedent relic, a place once brewing with the incumbency of general matters now stands stagnantly. But only by assumption can any estimate, due to its present manifest of dilapidated prosperity, how opulent the glass that held the rise of the foaming lager was during any of the lifetimes it transcended. I wonder about the faces and voices that mingled and bickered within the conditions of its bounds. And what of their existences and of the history of the place’s architecture? I wonder whether or not improvements were made to it whenever the grip on the ring of the keys changed ownership, or was it an heirloom handed down and down and down—from generation to generation to generation until there were no longer any occupants left to govern the growth of its property? It looks as though the decline was slow, and its age is beyond old—ancient and avowed to oblige its ruination. I wonder just how old it is? Perhaps the last inhabitant, or inhabitants, couldn’t afford to keep fresh the corrosive elements of its solvent epitome and abandoned it. Or maybe it was sequestered by an invasive regiment but was given no further care—sealed away from anyone that would endeavor to trespass on its contents. Regardless of how it digressed into its current state, the demeanor of it now can remit only vaguely that which it once was via what it no longer is. And it can only regain its grandeur if it is torn down and rebuilt into something nicer looking, though not necessarily better.


© Copyright 2017 Christopher Harold. All rights reserved.

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