Tales of Great Fortune XXIII - A tale of customer support

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Humor  |  House: Booksie Classic
In his pursuit of success in the business of fortune telling, the Great Trenlin oversees the attempts of his coworker Porric, to grow into an accomplished reader.

Submitted: May 23, 2016

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Submitted: May 23, 2016

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"Please don't kill me!"

"Please, I swear sir, the crystal ball just slipped from my hands."
With the expression of fear all over his face, the customer eyed Porric suspiciously. Witnessing the events and despite his very clear visions of what was about to happen, even the Great Trenlin felt a bit shaken. Not as shaken as the crystal ball though, which laid in shatters on the floor behind the customer, who in turn seemed to be in shatters as well, seeking cover behind the desk. It was a complex situation, only for great fortune tellers to oversee.
 
"Porric?"
"Yes sir. Sorry sir."
"Ah!" The Great Trenlin raised his arm in protest, "what did I tell you about being sorry, Porric?"
"That I am an imbicile, sir."
"No, Porric."
"Aren't I?"
"Well of course you are Porric, but that was not the question," the Great Trenlin responded without losing too much of his temper. A remarkable feature given the situation, he knew intuitively.
Much to his surprise, Porric seemed to be thinking for a brief yet glorious moment.
"I shouldn't be sorry before the fat lady sings?"
The Great Trenlin raised his eyebrows ever so slightly as he anxiously checked the presence of any feminist activists in the area. Much to his satisfaction, the place seemed clean, just as he had expected before looking around anxiously, he knew.
"Porric. You really do have an odd way with words and customers."
"O. O. O. I know! I know! I should not be sorry unless there are reasons for unreasonable doubt," he proclaimed proudly.
The Great Trenlin sighed as he shook his head in well-anticipated disappointment. "Apologize to the customer, Porric."
 
As Porric approached, the customer held up his hands in a defensive posure. The Great Trenlin knew his underling would not be able to recognize the clear vibrations that manifested themselves in the room.
"Sir customer," Porric commenced while the customer squeaked.
"Oops, sorry sir," he continued and turned to the Great Trenlin, "Just stepped on foot, sir. Won't happen again."
"Behave as a professional, Porric. You really do not have a lot of opportunities to make a good first impression."
"Quite, sir."
"Remember. Clothes do make the man only to the extent that their decorum doesn't break them." It was immedaitely clear to the Great Trenlin that it was not a good opportunity to advise his underling on a better suited location for his bow tie.
 
Porric returned to the customer, who was in the midst of heaving himself from the floor. With a gracious and professional bow, Porric headbutted him back to the ground.
In their synchronuous wailing, the Great Trenlin could clearly read the signs of yet another painful and challenging legal matter.


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