Don't Tell Anybody

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
A short story of dogs and justice

Submitted: June 03, 2016

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Submitted: June 03, 2016

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Don't Tell Anybody

 

The way it all came to pass, from the first day I noticed it until the last, it made a believer out of me. It made me believe that sometimes wrongs do get righted, and sometimes justice is served when it should be served. It made me aware of things that would seem an impossibility to most, and might make me look crazy, but I swear it must be true. Animals, they talk to each other. Here's what went down, just the way it did, I hope you'll agree to be crazy with me. Just don't tell anybody.

Living here in this quaint little neighborhood, way back at the end of a one way dead end street, it's just the way I like it.

After thirty years of teaching school to kids, this was a good place to relax and spend my retirement, nice, cozy, and private.

My little home has a tiny yard out back, flanked by two other little yards, and directly across from my backyard stands his house.

Now if there is anything wrong at all in this whole perfect picture it's this fella. He just doesn't fit into the landscape, into the peaceful and friendly neighborhood that surrounds me.

Since my kitchen window looks directly out into my little backyard, and therefore right across at his and the backside of his house, I had no choice really.

No choice but to watch, as he threw his dog out the back door into the yard, and when it stood up, he ran over and kicked it across that yard from side to side.

I must have stood there without moving for a long time, because when I finally did my old bones were really aching.

I peered out again. The little dog was alone now in that yard, and was over by his left fence. You see, on that side of the fence there's a big black German shepherd, a big beautiful picture of strength that dwarfed it's tiny little beagle hound neighbor.

I watched as that little dog hobbled, yes, hobbled, over to his right side fence, and stood nose to nose through the chain link with his other neighbor.

Another big one, a big white Husky, quite the sight to behold. Then, as if on cue, the dogs all began to howl, and the cry was picked up by other dogs down the street, and it became a crescendo of sound, some deeper and guttural, others high and wailing, but it seemed that every dog in the neighborhood was yelling about something.

Back and forth it went, howls ringing through the air, the little dogs yapping drowned out in the sea of barking.

Well, me, I'm not much for confrontation, and geez, I'm just a 70 something little old retired schoolteacher, but I grabbed onto my walker, and I pushed out my door, and made my way all the way around to that man's front door.

Quite out of breathe I was, when I finally arrived, but I do believe I had enough air left in my lungs to give a good yelp when he answered my insistent knocking by flinging open that door and pointing a gun directly at my face.

I don't know how many folk have had the pleasure of seeing the hole that is the opening of a gun barrel from the very front of it, and when it's being held pointed at you by an unfriendly hand, but let me tell you, it's not going to go down in my history as making my top ten list of most wonderful experience I've had, no sirr-eee!

And when he blurted out "Bang!", I must admit I nearly peed myself. Well, actually, I did, but don't tell anybody.

That man looked right into my what must have been petrified eyes, and he slowly swung that door shut in my face.

And what did I do? Maybe I should have just been calling the police and animal cruelty long before I made the trek over to his home, but I hadn't, and I didn't.

Seemed like hours until I made it all the way back around to my own place, even being spurred on by the fact that I'd just had a pistol pointing at my nose, and I needed to change my clothes.

All said and done, I once again peered out that window, just in time to see that man coming right back into his yard again, head right to the little dog, and give it yet another kick.

And suddenly, the entire, and I mean entire, orchestra of dogs went silent. It happened so sudden, from a volume of ten down to zero that even the man gave pause to stare around.

I was about to turn away and go find my phone, put an end to this sickening scene, when the picture being painted suddenly took a turn for the better. At least, in my opinion, but don't tell anybody.

When that man turned around, he was met face to face with the little dog's neighbor, and Mr. German shepherd didn't appear to be wanting to join the game.

And in the same instant, Mr. Husky leaped over the fence, and crouched right behind that man. Well, the man started to wheel and turn, tried to circle around his yard for the back door, and those two dogs looked to be, well, stalking him.

He made a run for it, I'll give him that. And those two big dogs just sat back and growled, and I figured he was going to get inside that house and get that ole gun and shoot'em, and my little ole heart pounded.

It was right then, just when he reached his back door, that it happened. It might sound like a movie scene, and I know this doesn't ring true, but a whole wave of dogs began leaping that fence. 

There were big dogs, and little dogs, and middle size dogs. There were dogs of all breeds, dogs of all ages, and they poured over that fence.

And they engulfed that man, buried him inside of a huge moving blob made of fur and claws, fangs and growls, and I just stood there and watched, yes I did, but don't tell anyone.

Then, as quick as they came, they disappeared, and everything appeared to be picture perfect again in the neighborhood.

Well, except for the man, of course. Quite a sad sight indeed, mangled, twisted and torn, the scene of a horror film if one didn't know why.

Yet somehow, I didn't feel sorry, I didn't feel sad, I only felt happiness, and I know that's wrong, but don't tell anybody.

And the next time I looked out back, that little dog was in my yard.

So that's how me and my dog Tipper came to be, in a roundabout long but true story, but don't tell anybody.

The local news came to figure the man was attacked by a roving pack of wild dogs, and who am I to say if that's the truth or not. 

I'm just a crazy ole lady living here at the end of the street with my little dog Tipper, and maybe we both know there's more to the story than they do, but don't tell anybody!


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