Waterfalls

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Mystery and Crime  |  House: Booksie Classic
Barney Cisco is an unadventurous Bristol City supporter. Circumstances conspire to make him want to change his life. Stacey Jayne is bored with her life and wants to be a painter. What will happen when their paths cross?

Submitted: July 05, 2016

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Submitted: July 05, 2016

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Waterfalls by Chris Green

1:

Through thick and thin, Barney Cisco has followed Bristol City's fortunes, travelling up and down the country in all winds and weathers to watch his team play. He has been able to finance his fanatical support through a lucrative stall at Compton Regis market selling cheap foreign mattresses at inflated prices. While Bristol City, or the Robins as they are known, might not have the glamour of Manchester United or Chelsea, the club has occasionally excelled. Although he was just a lad, Barney remembers the heady days in the late seventies when City enjoyed top flight football and although they lingered near the foot of the table the entire time, he became hooked by the excitement of their annual relegation battle.

Bristol City's purple patch was in bitter contrast to what was to follow. In 1982 they became the first club to suffer three consecutive relegations, ending up in what was then Division 4. Remarkably, the young Barney remained undeterred. He watched City yo-yo up and down the divisions over the decades without missing a single match, not even the Third Round FA Cup tie against Carlisle that was abandoned after ten minutes when the north-west suffered the worst blizzard in its history.

As soon as he was old enough, Barney took his son, Sonny to matches with him, that is until Sonny got caught in possession of a thousand ecstasy tablets and was sentenced to three years at Exeter Crown Court. Sonny claimed he was looking after the drugs for a friend, but Judge Girley in his summing up suggested that this may have been his imaginary friend, Pluto.

Barney was shocked by Sonny's arrest and imprisonment. In his self-absorption, he had failed to notice Sonny's disappearances after Saturday matches or his recurrent mood swings. Rather than look a little deeper into the possible causes of his downfall, he blamed Sonny's waywardness on Dolores. Dolores had walked out on them when Sonny was just seven, acknowledged by child psychologists to be a key age in a boy's development. She went off to live with Shaun O'Shea, a scaffolder from Skibareen. She said she hated football. She said that Shaun was a sensitive man who played the harp. Drank the Harp, more like, Barney told her. Still, Dolores would find out about Shaun's drink problem and come running back, tail between her legs. Dolores didn't. Barney was left to look after Sonny's welfare. He never forgave Dolores.

With Sonny now incarcerated, Barney felt bereft.

Darren Spurlock, a friend of his, told him about Lorelei Angel, a life coach that had helped him to turn his life around.

'She will take you from where you are to where you want to be,' he said, over a pint or two at the Dog and Duck one Sunday lunchtime. 'She worked on my self-confidence and fitted me out with the tools to secure a pizza delivery franchise. Although I had not realised it before, running a pizza delivery operation was something that I had secretly always wanted to do.'

Darren managed to persuade Barney to go along to Lorelei for a consultation.

Barney spent a while nervously explaining to Lorelei how he felt. To his surprise, he found that she actually listened to what he was saying and after the first few minutes, he found it easy to open up to her. He told her how he had put his life on hold to bring little Sonny up. How he had worked every day, except for match days, to put a roof over Sonny's head with not a word of encouragement from Dolores. How heartbroken he had been when Sonny was sentenced. He had nearly cried outside the court. How he realised that it was now time to put his life in order. Start taking care of himself.

'You need to make some changes in your life in order to bring about the transformation,' Lorelei told him.

'I suppose I could start selling cheap foreign settees at the market along with the mattresses, and perhaps bucket chairs and maybe some rugs' said Barney.

'Well, that would be a start,' said Lorelei. 'But it's not what you'd call a big change, is it, Barney? You may find you need to branch out a little more than that. OK. Let's leave the career change for now. You might want to look into changing some of your habits. What do you do at weekends?'

'I go to watch the Robins play,' Barney said. Had she not been listening? 'That's Bristol City.'

'Bristol City. That's a football team, isn't it?' Perhaps she had been listening after all.

'That's right.'

'And you go every weekend?'

'Well, yes, every weekend from August to May.'

'There you go then. There's are unlimited opportunities for some change there.'

'Oh, I think I see what you are getting at,' Barney might have been tempted to say. 'You mean sometimes I could go to watch Bristol Rovers, instead? That would be funny. That would make it a pair of Bristols. Get it! Bristol City and Bristol Rovers. Pair of Bristols.'

'I can see why your wife left you,' Lorelei might have said, head in hands. 'You might want to work a little on your misogyny too. And your sexist humour.'

But such a final exchange did not take place. That Barney showed a new found restraint was testament both to Lorelei's motivational skills and to his willingness to learn. The session with Lorelei had brought home to him how predictable and unfulfilling his life was. He deserved better. He was tired of playing the victim. If he was to feel fulfilled, he recognised that he needed to change. He made the decision there and then not to renew his season ticket. After all, the Robins had only just seen off relegation – yet again, finishing eighteenth in the table. This was hardly something to get excited about. They would probably do just as badly next year. Into the bargain, season tickets prices were set to rise. He needed to get things in perspective. There had to be better ways to spend his weekends. Perhaps he could go to country fairs or take up yoga. There again, perhaps not. But he would find something that worked for him. What about Art? He could go and visit some galleries or try his hand at painting.

2:

Stacey Jayne has long wanted to be an artist. In such spare moments as family life has allowed, she has got her brushes out and painted tentative watercolours. She has concentrated on subjects around the house and in the garden, still lifes and flowers. To prevent her partner, Dorsey, local councillor and Mayor-Elect from belittling her attempts, she has kept these hidden. Although she has always been uncertain of her ability, one or two of her friends who have happened to call in have caught her working and complimented her on her efforts. Lindy Lou loves her subtle study of the kitchen utensils in the washing up bowl and suggests that she try the classes at the local community centre. They are not expensive and she has heard that the tutor, Lamaar Fike is very good.

Stacey Jayne decides to go along to check out the opportunity and as luck should have it, a new course is due to start the following day. She signs up for a term. From her very first effort, Lamaar tells her that she has a good eye for detail. He says that she might be ready to move on to acrylics or oils and that she should have a proper space at home to paint in, so she buys an easel and sets up a makeshift studio in the spare room. Having arranged the space to her liking, she decides what she needs is a bucket chair to be able to sit comfortably at her easel.

The man in the David Hockney tee-shirt at the stall at Compton Regis market is very helpful. He shows her a range of comfortable looking bucket chairs.

'I rather like this red one,' she says, after she had tried a few. 'But ….. it says, Made in Romania. Romania? Is that good?'

'It's a little-known fact but all the best bucket chairs are made in Romania,' he says. 'And of course, I only stock the best. I have my reputation to think of.'

'I think, I'll take it, then,' she says. 'I hope you don't mind me inquiring, but I couldn't help noticing your tee-shirt. I love David Hockney. Do you paint?'

All that Barney knows about Hockney is that he is some kind of painter, a pop artist he thinks or is he an Impressionist? Perhaps they are the same thing. He is not sure. Nor has Barney actually started his venture into art yet, he thought he would buy the tee shirt first. This, however, is not the time for him to admit these shortcomings. His customer is a very attractive woman. And, she seems to be taking an interest in him. This is not something that has happened very much lately.

'A little,' he says, with a shrug, hoping that hinting at modesty might suggest he has insurmountable talent. 'I paint a little.'

Deceit does not come naturally to Stacey Jayne. Perhaps this has something to do with her convent education. She is anxious therefore not to exaggerate her artistic prowess. But, at the same time, she would like to show this talented painter with the sideline in market trading that she is versed in the language of fine art techniques. 'I've just started a course,' she says. 'I'm learning acrylics and oils. We're doing stippling, dabbing and flicking at the moment.'

Acrylics? Stippling? Dabbing? Flicking? Oils? H'mm, thinks Barney.

'That's good,' seems the safest response. He goes with it.

Stacey Jayne's 'What kind of things do you paint?' is parried with Barney's 'Well, you know. A bit of this, a bit of that.'

Her bold 'Oh really! I'd love to see some of your work,' meets with an uncertain 'Sure.'

'That's great,' she says. 'I look forward to that.'

Her phone rings and she moves away a little. A voice appears to be shouting down the phone at her. Her serenity vanishes. Her posture changes. Her brow furrows. Her fists clench.

'You're going to do what?' she screams. 'If you do, that's it!'

Perhaps things at home are not hunky dory for Stacey Jayne, he thinks. Might this present him with an opportunity, later on? Probably not. But then, you never know.

3:

Stacey Jayne has been bothered by Dorsey's petulance for some time. Toys, pram and propulsion spring to mind. If he doesn't get his own way, he goes into infant mode and throws a tantrum. He is controlling, dictatorial. He has always shown a deep resentment of her having hobbies of her own. She recalls the time that she went a cake decorating demonstration when, apparently, she should have been raising the Union Flag in the garden for the Queen's birthday. Dorsey went ballistic. And the occasion that she wanted to go to a belly dancing class with Donna. He hid her house keys and locked her in the house. But, returning home to find that her husband has torn up her watercolours and trashed her easel is the final straw. What would the people of the town think if they knew that Councillor Dorsey Pitts, Mayor-Elect was guilty of such wanton destruction over his pretty wife wanting to express herself? She had only joined an art class, not boiled his favourite bunny or slept with Satan.

But if she really wants to bring Dorsey's name into disrepute, she will bring the public's attention to his connections with the English Defence League, the English Volunteer Force, or the one with the Germanic name. When she had taken the matter of his involvement up with him, he had tried to pass his clandestine communications off as freemasonry, but bit by bit Sarah Jayne discovered his connections were more sinister. While he might not be a leading light in any of these far-right organisations, the fact that he has associations with them at all would surely be enough to ruin his mainstream political career. After all, this is a cosmopolitan town, not somewhere where a local politician of any party should be holding extreme views. However hidden Dorsey's connections or however convincing his subsequent denial of them might be, suspicions about him would remain. The old saying there's no smoke, and all that.

But, this is something to keep back for later, a negotiating tool if you like. He can communicate with her from now on through solicitors. She is leaving him. What he has done is unforgivable. She can go and stay with Donna until she finds somewhere. And she will give Barney Cisco a call. He is bound to know where she can rent some studio space to paint in.

4:

Hi. Barney Cisco speaking,' he says. He does not recognise the number.

'Hello, Barney. I don't know if you remember me. I'm Stacey Jayne,' she says. 'I bought a bucket chair from you a few days ago.'

Remember her? Of course he remembers her. He's been thinking about nothing else since their meeting. Not even Bristol City's problems in defence or Sonny's upcoming parole hearing. 'Ah, yes. I think I do remember you,' he says, trying to muster up cool indifference.

'I was just wondering if you might be able to help me,' she says. 'What with your connections in the art world. My circumstances have uh …… changed and I wondered if you might know of a small studio space to rent where I could paint.'

'I've think I might have the very thing,' he says, trying desperately to think of the very thing he might have.

'Could I come and have a look?' she says.

'I'll tell you what, Stacey,' he says. 'Give me a day or two and I will get back to you. Is this the best number to get you on?'

Barney is thrown into a panic. Facilitating the space for Stacey Jayne to paint presents no problem. He can set aside a couple of rooms at the back of his warehouse. He will need to clear it out a bit of junk, and clean up, but this can easily be done. He can buy some easels and paints from Nicki Bello's artists' supply stall. But, what about the paintings? He needs to make it look like it is a working studio and that he has completed a few canvases and has others in progress. Where on earth is he going to get hold of these? Suddenly, he has the light-bulb moment. There is a prestigious exhibition on at Art Attack by an overseas artist with an unusual name. He knows this because his friend and fellow Bristol City supporter, Jarvis Vest works as a security guard there. Given favourable circumstances, and a little guile, he can borrow some paintings from there.

5:

'These paintings are brilliant, Barney,' says Stacey Jayne, as she moves slowly round the four large canvases of Tuscan landscapes in the makeshift studio. 'You are so talented. I don't know how my poor daubings will look alongside these.'

'It's good of you to say so, Stacey Jayne,' he says. He is pleased with how he easily he managed to blot out Lili Stankovich's signature and replace it with Barney Cisco using some black paint on the wrong end of a small brush. You can hardly notice the alterations.

'What are you working on at the moment?' she asks.

'I'm doing another landscape in oils,' he says. 'I took it home to do a bit on it last night. Sometimes I find that the light is better in my conservatory.'

'Ah, I see.' says Stacey Jayne. 'Look! I've got my bits and pieces in the car. I'll bring them in, if that's OK, then if you are interested, I was wondering whether you might want to go and see that Lili Stankovich exhibition that's on at Art Attack.'

'I've a lot on today, maybe next week,' says Barney. Procrastination is a tried and tested strategy and in his line of work maybe next week means never.

'Oh look, Barney!' says Stacey Jayne. 'Isn't that the police outside?'

'What?' says Barney. 'Oh my God!'

He busies himself trying his best to cover up the canvases that are on show while he tries to remember what Sonny's solicitor was called.

'They're peering through the window, now,' says Stacey Jayne. 'I wonder what they might want. I hope you are not in trouble, Barney.'

Why, oh why had he listened to Lorelei Angel? Why had he tried to better himself? And what made him think he had a chance with a babe like Stacey Jayne? He should have followed the advice of that song that was always playing on Tonya Ludovic's bric-a-brac stall. 'Don't go chasing waterfalls,' it went, or something like that. 'Stick to the rivers and lakes that you're used to.' He should have stuck to what he was good at, supporting Bristol City through thick and thin and selling cheap foreign mattresses at inflated prices at his market stall.

© Chris Green 2016: All rights reserved


© Copyright 2017 Chris Green. All rights reserved.

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