12 Struggles of Being a Writer

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Oh, the struggles of being a writer.

Here is a list of problems only writers will understand. I hope you can relate (for the sake of humour) and get a good laugh!

© Copyright 2016 BriannasBooks. All rights reserved.

Submitted: July 21, 2016

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Submitted: July 21, 2016

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12 Struggles of Being a Writer

 

As much as we all enjoy the craft of writing, there is always something nagging at the backs of our brains, annoying the hell out of us and making us wish we could just be perfect. So I'm just gonna jump right into it and share with you twelve struggles that every writer knows, no matter how good or bad you are at it. We all get these, even if you try to deny it.

 

  1. Forgetting your ideas

Let's face it; we do this ALL. THE. TIME. It's annoying, especially when a really good idea pops into your head at night, and because you're too lazy to get out your phone or notebook or whatever, you tell yourself the biggest lie ever: “I'll remember it tomorrow.” NO YOU WILL NOT. I have done this more times than I can count, and it's really disappointing, because it could have been some genius story that would have turned into something serious, but no, I couldn't take two seconds out of my day to write it down. *Shakes head*

 

  1. Reconstructing an entire sentence because you don't know if the grammar is right

You don't even have to be a writer to experience this – you could just be trying to finish your essay or whatever – but this one I find particularly annoying. It's not even one part of the sentence that you have to delete; it's usually the whole thing. And sometimes making the grammar proper makes a new sentence that barely makes sense in your story, but it's the only way it'll work in a way that you know is correct. Arghhh.

 

  1. Getting distracted way too easily

It's easy for anyone to admit that while they know they should be writing, a tiny voice in their heads whispers, “Watch YouTube,” and then you listen to that voice and completely neglect even the thought of writing. And three hours later, it's midnight, and you have to go to bed, and then you get mad at yourself for having not accomplished anything, and then it repeats the next day. I don't know about you guys, but this is one of the main reasons I don't get anything done, lol.

 

  1. Setting yourself goals you will never complete

Ever get in those moods where you start planning the stuff you're going to do for the next two weeks? “Get up at 7 in the morning and start chapter 5 tomorrow, probably write at least half the chapter, finish chapter 5 the next day, try to squeeze in chapter 6 the next day, as well as edit chapter 5, have the novel completed by the end of the month.” But then that day comes, and you don't feel like doing anything other than sit around. If you start that chapter, you probably get a maximum of 100 words written. So once again, like me, you are a big liar. Shame on you!

Totally kidding. But still.

 

  1. False writing moods

Sometimes we all get in that mood where we're like, “I want to write a poem!” or “I feel like starting a new story!” But then you open up the document on your computer or on your phone or whatever and your mind just blanks. The only thing you can do is stare at the friggin screen because you have no idea what to write. Then you just decide not to write, because you don't know what to write. Whether we like to believe it or not, we are all hardcore procrastinators.

 

  1. We don't know if it's good or not

This one annoys me the most, because we've read it a million times and we know everything that happens, so you have no idea if it's actually any good. You don't feel anything. Are readers intrigued? Does it capture attention? Does the suspense build really well? Can you feel the emotion? WE DON'T KNOW. People can tell us that it does all of the above, but even then they could be lying too. You'll never read your own story like you would another story, if that makes sense, and it sucks, big time.

 

  1. You try to make everything perfect, even when it's not a story

Let's say you had to do a write-up in biology, or something on the complete opposite end of literature. Your writer brain tells you that what you've written so far isn't good enough, so just like you would with a story, you go back and edit the shit out of that document, even though the teacher does not care how much big words you use or how good you write; as long as you've actually done the assignment, you're good to go. But your writer brain does not agree. It has to be perfect, and it has to make you sound like a writer.

 

  1. You want criticism, but you don't

You want points to work with, but at the same time you're scared someone is gonna tell you that you're a bad writer and you might as well give up now before you embarrass yourself. I feel like this is something all of us do at some point, and although it would be really helpful if someone gave you constructive criticism, sometimes it feels like a slap to the face. We're all so sensitive. You know what I'm saying?

 

  1. You get jealous of someone who's better than you

When you're reading something, you know deep down that the author kind of has better form than you do, or they're just really good at evoking emotion. So you start to get jealous, and then you think it'll be a good idea to go back and edit your story to make it sound better. Better than this author. Who do they think they are, anyway? So you edit, and edit, and edit, and edit, and in the end it's all worse than what you originally started with, so then you get even more jealous and angry, and then you start telling yourself how terrible of a writer you are. You're not, though, don't worry. We all do this. At least I think so, anyway.

 

  1. You're constantly thinking about your story

All day, every day, and even during the night, you think of nothing else but your story. Your characters and everything they go through. It throws you off and sometimes makes you ignore things in the real world, because it's like you literally live in a fantasy. It's not really a bad thing, though. Is it?

 

  1. Having to read your terrible old works

Oh God, the horror. You improve the more you write, so when you look back on stuff you've written in the past, when you had less experience, it makes you cringe. Hard. You thought it was the best thing since sliced bread when you were writing it, but now when you look at it, you want to cry. Throw fire at it. Burn it so it no longer exists, and no one ever has to see it again.

 

  1. When you have a unique idea, but someone else has the same idea

I. HATE. THIS. So much! Because if you actually start writing it, it makes it look like you're copying that person, even though you've never even read their story; only the summary. I would never have the heart to copy anyone, so if I ever get accused of copying because of something like this, I could go into full rage mode.

 

So that concludes. I hope you enjoyed, and let me know if you want me to do more of these!


© Copyright 2017 BriannasBooks. All rights reserved.

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