RECENT KILLINGS ALONG ORE, BOMADI COMMUNITIES IN DELTA STATE BY FULANI HERDSMEN IN NIGERIA ( A Legal Overview and Socio-Legal Palliatives)

Reads: 153  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Mystery and Crime  |  House: Booksie Classic
This article seeks to review the herdsmen’s nefarious activities in the Niger Delta and suggests unbias and unprejudiced Legal Prisms as Palliatives in proffering solutions to the menace of the herdsmen. This article argues that the Anti Grazing Law passed by Fayosi of Ekiti States, barring by some communities kingpins of the Herdsmen is an aberration of the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights, Chapter IV of the Nigerian Constitution and other international Bills of Rights and Instruments Nigeria acceded to. This work suggests that the Federal Government should come up with a legal frame work for the building of Ranches and Grazing reserves, proper nomadic education and Nomadic Fulani Education on the purport of the Land Use Act. It is further argued that ranches should be established by States and not the Federal Government since the extant land use law gives ownerships of state lands to the people of the states to be in the custody of their governors. It is finally argued that herdsmen are not terrorist but any one found with Arms and ammunition should be prosecuted.

Submitted: January 24, 2017

A A A | A A A

Submitted: January 23, 2017

A A A

A A A


RECENT KILLINGS ALONG ORE, BOMADI COMMUNITIES IN DELTA STATE BY FULANI HERDSMEN IN NIGERIA

( A Legal Overview and Socio-Legal Palliatives)

 

Written By Mr. Calabar E. Daniel (LL.B), (L.B.), (CIPM) 

 

The Author Mr. Calabar E. Daniel reserve all rights to this content and work andd no part shallbe plagiarized without the consent of the Author.

 

This article seeks to review the herdsmen’s nefarious activities in the Niger Delta and suggests unbias and unprejudiced Legal Prisms as Palliatives in proffering solutions to the menace of the herdsmen. This article argues that the Anti Grazing Law passed by Fayosi of Ekiti States, barring by some communities kingpins of the Herdsmen is an aberration of the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights, Chapter IV of the Nigerian Constitution and other international Bills of Rights and Instruments Nigeria acceded to. This work suggests that the Federal Government should come up with a legal frame work for the building of Ranches and Grazing reserves, proper nomadic education and Nomadic Fulani Education on the purport of the Land Use Act. It is further argued that ranches should be established by States and not the Federal Government since the extant land use law gives ownerships of state lands to the people of the states to be in the custody of their governors. It is finally argued that herdsmen are not terrorist but any one found with Arms and ammunition should be prosecuted.

While it is believed that the chronic scarcity of pasture is the primary cause of nomadic pastoralism, the same scarcity is causing the Fulani to take their herds to the uncontested forage in the outskirts of towns and large villages. Roaming cows, sheep, and goats scavenging around school playgrounds, golf courses, government residential areas, street shoulders, and railway sidings are a common sight in the cities. These beasts obstruct traffic flow, endanger street users, and accentuate urban congestion. In addition to annoying riders and drivers, animals litter the ground and bring flies and stench.

 

The above photographs were shot on 18th January 2017 along Ore express Way in the East West Road, Delta State of Nigeria.In the past Lagos Traffic Jam has been the ever greatest in the History of Nigerian traffic congestion. In my mind the traffic congestion that took place on 18th January 2017 has displaced the purportedly ever greatest Traffic Jam in Lagos.

As you can see from the above pictures, some crops of women folk barricade the Major Road, setting fire wood, bricks and other hurdled instruments creating barriers and sat on them. Report from a trusted source said these crop of women came from the Neighboring communities including the women from the host communities, the children folk and young women were also involved by performing activities of peaceful rally with a yearning chants monophonically. Retorting repeatedly thus; “ we no go gree!!!; we no go greeee ooooooh...!!!!”

 

Report also suggested that the traffic started around 5:30 AM and ended 6: PM, at the onset of this barricading, some officers of the Nigerian Police Force were first invited by one of the passengers to ward-off the ever recalcitrant and gregarious women, conscientiously and firing tear gases to the air in order to seize oxygen whereby causing carbon-dioxide excess so that civilians may not breath. But these smart efforts were intensifying more affray and tumultuous assault or quarrel on the Officers and exacerbated the breach of the peace of the environment to cause reasonable apprehension. Hence the officers entered their pick up Van and swung off.

 

Conversely, the Deputy, governor, the Commission of Police, and Assistant Inspector General of Police (AIG) Zone 5 Benin were all present to dissuade the intensifying effort and plausible affray and barricades but it was like a pinch of salt as their efforts were truncated.

While some of the women sat on the road, others demonstrated around the area with placards, some of which bore the inscriptions, “We don’t want Fulani herdsmen on our land,” “Where is Okowa, come and rescue us,” “Security agencies, do your work,” “No farm, no road for anybody to pass.”

 

 I found it questionable, conscientiously demanding to know their solemn cry, hence, i alighted from the motor cycle { the traffic was so long that you have to take another transport fare (okada ) to pass the traffic about 6 miles before one can board a taxi to whatsoever place you may go } and asked one of them, the story she told me was so pathetic.

She succinctly narrated the ordeal the communities were passing through and the efforts put in place to obviate the situation but to no avail. She said thus: “We not want Hausa people on our land, they are molesting our women, the ones that refuse to be molested, they will butcher them with cutlass, they are lords even in our bush with their cattle.”

She said: “They have molested up to 10 women in recent months and some persons are dead. The women that was attacked this morning is lying on the ground there in front of a chemist shop.”

Another villager added: “A native, Rufus, who went to the farm, was killed December 25, last year, these people are armed with AK 47 rifles and other sophisticated weapons.”

It is inlight of the above backdrop, this article is written to profile everlasting palliatives to stop the indiscriminate killings of civilians by Fulani Herdsmen in the Niger Delta Region.

 

Over the years the Fulani Herdsmen had killed innocent citizens of the Niger Delta Heart.

 

 The menace of Fulani herdsmen is becoming worrisome as the pastoralists are getting renowned by the day for their destructive act in wherever they take their cattle to for grazing. To mention only but a few of such atrocities allegedly committed by herdsmen in recent time. Recall that few days ago herdsmen reportedly killed a palm wine tapper,?Mr. Japheth Inibu and critically injured?one Mr. Thompson Ogege in Ofagbe community, Isoko North local government area of Delta state.

Other reports also have it that three building contractors have been kidnapped at Amorji in Onicha-Ukwani community, Ndokwa West local government area in Delta state by suspected Fulani herdsmen.

Not quite long, one Chinwuba Ekwueme, a villager in Egede community in Udi local council area of Enugu state was also murdered by suspected Fulani herdsmen.

In what could have sparked ethnic division if not for the quick intervention of some elder statesmen, a renowned Yoruba elite, Chief Olu Falae, was allegedly kidnapped on Monday, September 21, during his 77th birthdat by suspected Fulani Herdsmen in his Ilado farm along Igbatoro Road, Akure North local government area of Ondo state. The Yoruba leader was later released after a ransom of N5million was allegedly paid to the abductors. The National Assembly are debating on the passage of the Grazing Bill.

It is pertinent at this juncture not to waist your precious time in narrating the activities of this Herdsmen in the Region.

It must be borne in mind that some communities including, States Governments have taken the bull by the horn by barring the so called Pastoralists ( Herdsmen) from entering into such states and communities. For example, some communities in Isoko North and Ndokwa East local government areas of the Delta state, unanimously barred the herdsmen from bringing their cattle into their lands to graze. Other communities in the decision include; Ashaka, Ushie and Igbuku in Ndokwa East and Ofagbe, Isoko North local government area.

It was more worrisome when Mr Ayo Fayose, of Ekiti State on Monday AUGUST 29, 2016 signed the “Anti Grazing Bill 2016” recently passed by the House of Assembly. The bill was sponsored by the executive after the killing of two persons by suspected herdsmen in Oke Ako community in Ikole Local Government Area of the state. The new law criminalises grazing in some places and certain time limit in the state.

Brief synopsis of the Anti Grazing Law 2016is that grazing must henceforth be from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. on daily basis and that the government would allot portions of land to each local government area in that regard. “Anyone caught grazing on portions of land or any farmland not allotted by government shall be apprehended and made to face the law. “Any herdsman caught with firearms and any weapons whatsoever during grazing shall be charged with terrorism. Any cattle confiscated shall be taken to government cattle ranch at Erifun and Iworoko Ekiti community in the state. Any farm crop destroyed by the activities of any apprehended herdsman shall be estimated by agricultural officers and the expenses of the estimate shall be borne by the culprit. Any herdsman who violates any of these rules shall be imprisoned for six months without option of fine.

in my mind the above swift prisms taken by the afore -mention communities and the so harsh Anti Grazing Law 2016 in Ekiti State did not proffer solution. Are the Fulanis’ Terrorist orLand Grabbers?

Firstly, in view of the Constitutional provision of Nigeria, African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights, Adopted in Nairobi June 27, 1981 Entered into Force October 21, 1986 and the Universal Declaration of Human Right recognizing on the one hand, that fundamental human rights stem from the attributes of human beings, which justifies their national and international protection and on the other hand that the reality and respect of peoples rights should necessarily guarantee human rights; considering that the enjoyment of rights and freedom also implies the performance of duties on the part of everyone; and that civil and political rights cannot be dissociated from economic, social and cultural rights in their conception as well as universality and that the satisfaction of economic, social and cultural rights is a guarantee for the enjoyment of civil and political rights;

 Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world, disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law, 

Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between states . For instance, article 2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Right states thus:

 

Article 2 

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. 

Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty”.

Moreso, article 19 of the African Charter states thus: “All peoples shall be equal; they shall enjoy the same respect and shall have the samerights. Nothing shall justify the domination of a people by another”.

SOCIO-LEGAL PALLIATIVES

Firstly, a proper resuscitation of the Grazing reserves in Nigeria.

The Concept of Grazing Reserve

A grazing reserve is a piece of land that the government acquires, develops, and releases to the pastoral Fulani. The state and the local governments have gazetted and obtained grazing land varying from fifty to one hundred hectares. The federal government shoulders seventy percent of the burden of developing the grazing reserves, the state governments shoulder twenty percent, and the local government carry ten percent (Sulaiman n.d.). The Hurumi system is intended to encourage investment in the land and to ensure that the land is conserved. Controlled grazing that limits the number of animals entering a grazing land, leads to efficient rangeland management. Under the Hurumi system, the government gives each settler on the reserve a piece of land. Depending on the herd size and the carrying capacity of the land, the settler pays an annual rent to the government. In the rainy-season the reserve opens to the animals. The reserve closes in the dry-season, when animals must go on sojourn pasture (Laven 1991). Pastoralist must also adjust to the seasonal and spatial tenurial arrangements

During severe shortages of feed, the government opens the communal grazing areas to the distressed herds. Livestock owners must apply to the Project Office for a grazing permit. The pastoralists must also agree to follow the government's guidelines for stocking rate. The ten hectares per herding unit is apportioned as follows: four hectares for grazing, two for settlement, two for farming of legumes, and two for fallow.

Aims of the Grazing Reserves

The aims of grazing reserves include getting and protecting pasture-space for the national herds, and removing discord between agronomists and pastoralists living in the same geographic area. By separating the herders from the cultivators, the government hopes to foster peaceful coexistence between them by making the grazing reserve a zone of no-conflict. Improving land use and herd management, providing social welfare amenities to the Fulani, and increasing national income are pivotal in grazing reserve development in Nigeria (Laven 1991). The government hopes the grazing reserves will become the center of agro-pastoral innovations, a guarantor of land security, a nucleus for nomadic Fulani settlement, a precinct for crop/livestock systems integration, and a place for small-scale rather than large-scale holder-oriented production (Bako and Ingawa 1988). Ademosun (1976) lists some of the gains from the grazing reserves as easing seasonal migration, improving the quality of herds, multiplying outlet for bovine product, and enhancing access to extension and social services. The grazing reserve also encourages the uniform deployment of the cattle.

Secondly, the proper Legislation on Ranch

Most Nigerians are however of the opinion that ranches should be established by States and not the Federal Government since the extant land use law gives ownerships of state lands to the people of the states to be in the custody of their governors. For the purpose of emphasis, let us review the preliminary chapter of the Land Use Act of 1978 which is the only constitutionally known land administration law of Nigeria.

Specifically, Land Use Act in chapter 202, laws of the Federation of Nigeria of 1990 provide thus; “An Act to Vest all Land compromised in the territory of each State (except land vested in the Federal government or its agencies) solely in the Governor of the State , who would hold such Land in trust for the people and would henceforth be responsible for allocation of land in all urban areas to individuals resident in the State and to organizations for residential, agriculture, commercial and other purposes while similar powers will with respect to non urban areas are conferred on Local Governments.(27th March 1978) Commencement.”

The law in part 1 generally states thus; “1. Subject to the provisions of this Act, all land comprised in the territory of each State in the Federation are hereby vested in the Governor of that State and such land shall be held in trust and administered for the use and common benefit of all Nigerians in accordance with the provisions of this Act. 2. (1) As from the commencement of this Act – (a) all land in urban areas shall be under the control and management of the Governor of each State. And (b) all other land shall, subject to this Act, be under the control and management of the Local Government, within the area of jurisdiction of which the land is situated; (2) There shall be established in each State a body to be known as “the Land Use and Allocation Committee” which shall have responsibility for…”

Grazing land and stock-routes top the list of Fulani's demands from the government. All the leading presidential aspirants in the previous elections who were seeking the votes of Miyetti Allah Cattle Breeders Association of Nigeria (M.A.C.B.A.N.) had sent letters to the association assuring the Fulani of enough grazing land and stock-paths if elected.Discussions among government officials, traditional rulers, and Fulani leaders on the welfare of the pastoralists have always centered on requests and pledges for protecting grazing spaces and cattle passages. It has become evident that the political party that ignores the Fulani demand for grazing land would during an election attract a voter revenge.

The Growing pressure from Ardo'en (the Fulani community leaders) for the salvation of what is left of the customary grazing land has made some state governments with large population of herders to include in their development plans the reactivation and preservation of grazing reserves. Quick to grasp the desperation of cattle-keepers for land, the administrators have instituted a Grazing Reserve Committee to find a lasting solution to the rapid depletion of grazing land resources in Nigeria.

The Fulani believe that the expansion of the grazing reserves will boost livestock population, will lessen the difficulty of herding, will reduce seasonal migration, and will enhance the interaction among farmers, pastoralists, and rural dwellers. Despite these expectations, grazing reserves are not within the reach of about three-quarters of the Fulani. Most reserves, either by sheer distance from settlements or by lack of market facilities, tend to isolate the Fulani from the desired social and economic interdependence with the rest of the rural community. About sixty percent of migrant pastoralists who use the grazing reserves keep to the same reserves every year. The number and the distribution of the grazing reserves in Nigeria range from insufficient to severely insufficient for Fulani livestock.

 

Thirdly, proper Nomadic Education and Education for Nomadic Fulani on understanding the purport of the Land Use Act.

 

Most Pastoralists are illiterates, to the worst they found it difficult to communicate in English and do not know any thing about the purport of the Land Use Act.

It is commonly believed that the Pastoralists assumed that all land in Nigeria belongs to the Government, hence, they have such right to enter and graze on any land.

The Hurumi system lacks the legal statute to stop farmers from alienating the grazing land. The ease with which these farmers take over the land makes the Hurumi an endangered treasure of the Fulani (Awogbade 1982). Lack of formally gazetted land, implying lack of tenurial security, prevents investment in land and discourages settlement on the reserves (Waters-Bayer 1986b).

Because they have aggressive means of accessing the land, stay permanent on the land, establish recency on occupied land, or show intent for uninterrupted use of the land, farmers have greater advantage of securing land than the mobile pastoralists. The Fulani understanding of land possession differs from the legal or bureaucratic definitions of ownership. Ownership among the Fulani means the de facto possession or the occupation of uncontested and unchallenged land (although absolutism or de jure ownership of land is becoming prevalent among the Fulani, particularly those living near major settlements). The Fulani man who clears a parcel of land and builds his hut on it may claim rights of that piece of land if nobody else objects. When the Fulani man leaves the area, he relinquishes the claim for that land. In other words, property rights are temporary, circumstantial, and require no formalities such as having title deeds of witnesses other than physical presence. In their claims for land, the Fulani respect and uphold the principles of first-come-first-serve. It is in the above backdrop that have infuriated more tussle between farmers and the Herdsmen resulting the extra-judicial killings.

Individualize ownership of land around the homestead is not a serious land issue in Nigeria. For grazing reserve development, however, individual claims give way to collective claims. These claims are major concern because the land is extensive, boundless, and being used by pastoralists as well as non-pastoralists. The abrogation of traditional access to grazing territory by the Land Use Decree underscores the sociopolitical disruption in traditional pastoralism. The disruption increases rather than decreases land claims by non-pastoral users (Niamir 1990). Although the Land Use Act has abolished private possession of land, in practice, ownership is the rule rather than the exception, and "...traditional tenure system is still de facto if not de jure viable." (Niamir 1990, 83).

The Land Use Decree which seeks to remove the impediments to infrastructure provision actually adds to the problems of rural transformation in Nigeria. Although, in principle, the decree guarantees the pastoral Fulani rights to unbounded grazing parks, in reality it accentuates the demise of traditional pastoralism by augmenting the security of tenure among contiguous users with better access to open land.

 

Finally, the best solution to resolving the growing threats of terrorism of Nigerian communities by some Fulani herdsmen is for the Federal government to deploy unbiased and professionally efficient law enforcement mechanisms to arrest and prosecute all Fulani herdsmen bearing arms, and to prosecute those Fulani herdsmen who have unleashed violence in the different Nigerian communities. The law of Nigeria must not be circumvented because a FULANI MAN is the Nigerian President.

 

 

 

 

 

 


© Copyright 2017 Calabar E. Daniel. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments: