RIGHT OF AN ACCUSED TO BE GIVEN ADEQUATE FACILITIES TO DEFEND THE CHARGE AGAINST HIM.

Reads: 444  | Likes: 1  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Other  |  House: Booksie Classic
When a person is charged with Criminal offence,his liberty, life,and other human rights are at risk. It is more appalling when innocent citizens are crammed and dumped at the prison wards. Worsen still is when the Police unlawfully detained suspects in their cells without access to trial even though the law stipulates 24 hours within the radius of 40 kilometers away from court or 42 hours which the court may be considered as reasonable. It becomes more disheartening when the police for no reason charges a person with Holding Charge just for the Magistrates to remand the suspect in Prison pending the transmittance of the case file to the DPP for legal advice and possible prosecution because the Magistrates had no Jurisdiction to entertain the charge before it, and the Police obviate lawyers application for the enforcement of the suspect’s Human Right in Court. More so, when a person was managed to charge to court the prosecution in Magistrates courts feel that the accused is not entitled to the case file and other documents front-loaded to the Magistrates by the police. It it against the above backdrop, which this article argues that the accused (defendant under the evidence act) is entitled by law to be given photocopies or proper scrutiny every document,whether Police Crime Dairy,statement of Witnesses to the Police, statement of suspects whether confessional in nature or otherwise,articles and items obtained by the Police Investigating Officer (IPO) in the cause of pretrial investigation. It further argues that adequate time and facilities to the accused to prepare his defence includes and not limited to the above items.This article finally submits that the furnishing of these items to the accuse does not exist in a vacuum, but on some certain prerequisites for overriding public interest.

Submitted: February 01, 2017

A A A | A A A

Submitted: February 01, 2017

A A A

A A A


 

RIGHT OF AN ACCUSED TO BE GIVEN ADEQUATE FACILITIES TO DEFEND THE CHARGE AGAINST HIM.

 

Written By Mr. Calabar E. Daniel (LL.B), (L.B.), (CIPM) 

 

The Author Mr. Calabar E. Daniel reserves all rights to this content and work, no part shallbe plagiarized without the consent of the Author.

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENT

 Introduction

 Meaning of adequate facility

The legal interpretation of facility

Adequate time and legal meaning.

 Due process and the right to fair Hearing

 The attitude of court

 Trial on Summary court

 Right to adequate facilities and other international Instruments

The consequences to breach this right

 Conclusion

 

 

ABSTRACT 

When a person is charged with Criminal offence,his liberty, life,and other human rights are at risk. It is more appalling when innocent citizens are crammed and dumped at the prison wards. Worsen still is when the Police unlawfully detained suspects in their cells without access to trial even though the law stipulates 24 hours within the radius of 40 kilometers away from court or 42 hours which the court may be considered as reasonable. It becomes more disheartening when the police for no reason charges a person with Holding Charge just for the Magistrates to remand the suspect in Prison pending the transmittance of the case file to the DPP for legal advice and possible prosecution because the Magistrates had no Jurisdiction to entertain the charge before it, and the Police obviate lawyers application for the enforcement of the suspect’s Human Right in Court. More so, when a person was managed to charge to court the prosecution in Magistrates courts feel that the accused is not entitled to the case file and other documents front-loaded to the Magistrates by the police. It it against the above backdrop, which this article argues that the accused (defendant under the evidence act) is entitled by law to be given photocopies or proper scrutiny every document,whether Police Crime Dairy,statement of Witnesses to the Police, statement of suspects whether confessional in nature or otherwise,articles and items obtained by the Police Investigating Officer (IPO) in the cause of pretrial investigation. It further argues that adequate time and facilities to the accused to prepare his defence includes and not limited to the above items.This article finally submits that the furnishing of these items to the accuse does not exist in a vacuum, but on some certain prerequisites for overriding public interest. 

 

INTRODUCTION 

Human rights are universal values and legal guarantees that protect individuals and groups against actions and omissions primarily by State agents that interfere with fundamental freedoms, entitlements and human dignity. The full spectrum of human rights involves respect for, and protection and fulfilment of, civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights, as well as the right to development. Human rights are universal—in other words, they belong inherently to all human beings—and are interdependent and indivisible. 

 

Most persons facing trial in court are innocent of the offence in which they are charged. Some of the inmates have not been charged to court simply because the police had not transmitted the case file to the Department of Public Prosecution (DPP) to take decision whether a prima facie case is made against the suspect to warrant his trial in court. More so, most of the inmates awaiting trial were remanded by a Magistrate simply because the Court lacks jurisdiction to trial the matter, while some have not be given a reproduction warrant by the court to enable the Prison services produce the accused person at the time and place mentioned in the Reproduction Warrant. It is now apparent that for the DPP to prefer a charge or file an information against the suspect a proper leave of court is required. How ever in some jurisdiction, leave is not required for the DPP to prefer a formal charge against the suspect. While the DPP is going through the case file to see if he can file an information, the suspect or accused is lingering in prison. It is not out of place to mention that when the accused is being charged to court, his liberty is at risk and he must be given the adequate time and facility to prosecute his defence. 

 

All the rights and privileges given by law must be accorded to him. Hence, the doctrine of fair hearing has been breached and the accused is prejudiced. Given the accused facilities to defend himself, simply means that he must be provided with the necessary documents ,and time to prosecute his defence. It is not disputed that while the police are charged statutorily to investigate complaints and proper arrest if he reasonably believes that the suspect is said to have committed an offence, possible prosecution can be made against the suspect if a prima facie case is made against him. In the course of carrying out its investigation, the police invites witnesses to take down a statement after being cautioned and the witness volunteers make a statement which must be free from any oppression. The person who made a complaint at the charge room in the police station after the Police officer in charge at the Chanter entered the complaint in the Crime Diary. The statement of the complainant is then recorded in the witness statement form. In the same vein, the suspect is also expected to make a statement in the Suspects Statement form if he wishes to make a statement. 

I have argued elsewhere in this article that the suspect or accused person is not bonded to make a statement either at the police station or in the trial of his case which is also one of the rights of an accused or suspect as the case may be. The bulk of documents, articles, other incriminating or non incriminating items, documents whether the prosecution is tendering them or not must be made available for the defence to have photocopies of them and if they are articles and other items the accused must be put on notice that such documents shall be tendered in evidence at the trial of his case. 

 

It must be borne in mind that disclosure is one of the most important as well as one of the most abused of procedures relating to criminal trials. There needs to be a sea-change in the approach of both judges and the parties to the aspects of the handling of the material which the prosecution do not unintended to use in support of their case. For too long, a wide range of serious misunderstandings has existed, both as to the exact ambit of the unused material to which the defence is entitled, and the role to be played by the judge in ensuring that the law is properly applied. 

All too frequently applications by the parties and decisions by the judges in this area have been based either on misconceptions as to the true nature of the law or a general laxity of approach . This failure properly to apply the binding provisions as regards disclosure has proved extremely and unnecessarily costly and has obstructed justice. 

 

MEANING OF ADEQUATE FACILITY

 Although section 36(6)b of the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (as amended ) did not define the word “adequate”, and “facilities”, but when a word is plain, simple and does not constitute an ambiguous possible interpretation the ordinary dictionary meaning should be given, except its interpretation will lead to absurdity. It was held, inter Alia in: Ibrahim v. Barde (1996) 9 NWLR (Pt. 474) 513 @ 517 B-C per Uwais, CJN (as he then was) that if the words of the statute are precise and unambiguous, no more is required to expound them in their natural and ordinary sense. 

 

He held further that “the words of the statute alone, in such circumstance, best declare the intention of the lawmaker”. See also: Ojokolobo v. Alamu (1987) 3 NWLR (Pt. 61) 377 @ 402 F-H; Adisa v. Oyinwola & Ors (2000) 6 SC (Pt. II) 47; Uwazurike & Ors. v. A-G, Federation (2007) 2 SC 169.

 

 In A-G Federation v. Guardian Newspaper Ltd. (1999) 9 NWLR (Pt. 618) 187 @ 264 G-H this court held: "... a court of law is not to ascribe meanings to the clear, plain and unambiguous provisions of a statute in order to make such provisions conform with the court's own view of their meaning or of what they ought to be in accordance with the tenets of sound social policy”. 

 

The English Dictionary defined the word adequate to mean “whole support,equal to some requirement; proportionate, or fully sufficient”. From the above meaning of adequate it is the right of the accused to have proportionate, or fully sufficient information to enable him defence the charge made against him. 

 

Proportionate here means equal access to all the documents obtained by the Investigating Police Officer (I.P.O.) obtained in the cause of investigating the complaint laid before him and whether the prosecution intended to tender them or not at the trial of the accused case. 

 

It is pertinent here to define the word “Facility” as it is ascribed under the Nigerian Constitution. Webster's New World Dictionary defines the word "facility inter alia, as - "Ease of doing or making; absence of difficulty; the means by which something can be done." Dictionary.com defines "facilities" inter alia, as - "Something that permits the easier performance of an action, course of conduct, etc; to provide someone with every facility for accomplishing a task ... the quality of being easily or conveniently done or performed ..." In a nutshell, the word "facilities" embraces anything that would make it easier to perform an action or course of conduct, etc. 

 

THE LEGAL INTERPRETATION OF FACILITY

Any person charged with a criminal offence is entitled to be given adequate time and facilities to prepare for his defence. This is the main thrust or a precursor of adjournments. 

Therefore, an accused person is entitled to an adjournment in order to secure the services of a defence counsel or the attendance of Witnesses in his defence. However, the grant of adjournment depends on the circumstances of each particular case. 

 

Accordingly, for ease of reference it becomes necessary to reproduce Section 36 (6) (b) of the 1999 Constitution thus; “every accused person is entitled to adequate facilities for the preparation of his or her "defence". 

 

 Consequently, It is safe to submit here that when the above section of the Constitution used the phrase, “preparation of his defence” it simply means the accused person's "stated reason why the prosecutor had no valid case", esp., his or her "answer, denial or plea".

 

 In a nutshell, the word "facilities" embraces anything that would make it easier to perform an action or course of conduct ,the main thrust or precursor of adjournments prepare for his defence, the statements of witnesses to the Police, Police Crime Dairy, Statement suspect made to the police, and other documents or articles obtain in the cause of the investigation were part of the facilities that would aid him in the preparation of his defence. See EBELE OKOYE & ORS v.COMMISSIONER OF POLICE & ORS (2015) LPELR-24675(SC).

 

 For instance, an accused person's defence may be a complete and total denial of the commission of the offence, etc. Looking at it from this angle, the evidence against the accused, including statements of witnesses for the prosecution, would be necessary for the preparation of his defence. So they are "facilities" within the meaning of the said Section 36(6) (b), and this issue must be resolved in favour of the accused. (Emphasis mine)

 

 In my view, the well considered finding above is unassailable. It is in accord with the intention of the legislature to provide a person charged with a criminal offence with sufficient opportunity to prepare his defence and to prevent surprises been sprung on him at the trial. This is fundamental, as the accused person could be facing the loss of his life or personal liberty. There is nothing in Section 36 (6) (b) of the Constitution that restricts its application to either a summary trial or a trial on information or provides for a condition precedent to its application. With the greatest respect to the learned Justices of the court below, having held that the evidence against the appellant, including the statements of witnesses to the Police, were part of the facilities that would aid him in the preparation of his defence, ought to have stopped there and dismissed the appeal." Per KEKEREEKUN, J.S.C. (Pp. 69-72, paras. B-D)

 

DUE PROCESS AND THE RIGHT TO FAIR HEARING

 

The human rights protections for all persons charged with criminal offences, include the right to be presumed innocent, the right to a hearing with due guarantees and within a reasonable time, by a competent, independent and impartial tribunal, and an appeal as of right or with leave to appellate courts where he/she has been convicted,and sentenced, Right to be given adequate time and facilities to prosecute his/her defence are all pre-requisites to the attainment of due process and the right to fair trial.

 

International humanitarian law provides for substantially similar protections for the trial of persons in the context of criminal charges.

 In July 2007, the Human Rights Committee adopted general comment No 32, revising its general comment on article 14 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights on the right to a fair trial and equality before the courts and tribunals. The revised general comment notes that the right to a fair trial and to equality before the courts and tribunals is a key element of human rights protection and serves to safeguard the rule of law by procedural means. Article 14 of the Covenant aims at ensuring the proper administration of justice and to this end guarantees a series of specific rights, including that all persons should be equal before the courts and tribunals, that in criminal or civil cases everyone has a right to a fair and public hearing by a competent, independent and impartial tribunal, that everyone charged with a criminal offence should have the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law, and that everyone convicted of a crime should have the right to have his or her conviction and sentence reviewed by a higher tribunal according to law, and have the assess to information to defend the charge against him.See, generally, Human Rights Committee, general comment N° 13 (1984). And Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

 

 

THE ATTITUDE OF COURT 

The Golden Rule is that the prosecution must provide all articles, documents, and items obtained or gotten from the bulk of pretrial investigation for the accused to have an overview to Prosecute his defence in a criminal trial. EBELE OKOYE & ORS v.COMMISSIONER OF POLICE & ORS (ibid). 

 

It must be borne in mind that the doctrine of furnishing the accused with all relevant facilities to enable him prosecute his defence does not exist in vacuum but inched on necessarily pre-conditions. 

 

Indeed, before giving the accused with all documents obtained in the cause of pretrial investigation,these documents and materials must be relevant to the proceedings before it. It must be either a fact which though not in issue, are so connected with a fact in issue as to form part of the same transaction, are relevant, whether they occurred at the same time and place or at different times and places. Or, either facts which are the occasion, cause or effect , immediate or otherwise, of relevant facts, or , things under which they happened, or which afforded an opportunity for their occurrence or transaction, or fact which shows or constitutes a motive or preparation for any facts in issue or relevant fact. See Part II of the Evidence Act 2011. 

 

Secondly, the court may look into overriding public interest and the below questions to determine whether to order for the production of the such document; (1)what is the material which the prosecution seek to withhold? This must be considered by the court in detail. (2)Is the material such as may weaken the prosecution case or strengthen that of the defence? If NO, disclosure should not be ordered. If Yes, full disclosure should (subject to (3), (4), and (5) below be ordered. (3)Is there a real risk of serious prejudice to an important public interest (and , if so, what) if full disclosure of the material is ordered? If No, full disclosure should be ordered. (4)If the answer to (2), and (3) is Yes, can the defendant’s interest be protected without disclosure or disclosure be ordered to an extent or in a way which will give adequate protection to the public interest in question and also afford adequate protection to the interests of the defence? (5)Do the measures proposed in answer to (4) represent the minimum derogation necessary to protect the public interest in question? If No, the court should order such greater disclosure as will represent the minimum derogation from the golden rule of full production of all materials. 

 

Conversely, the argument been advanced by learned counsel for the respondent in the Ebele’s case which is in tandem with the decision of the Courts below is that the appellant ought to have elected to be tried summarily or on information before he would be entitled to the facilities he is requesting for to assist him in his trial. The reasoning of the court below is that: "The Chief Magistrate Court is not the place to ask for what belongs to proofs of evidence. Besides, the Chief Magistrate Court cannot just direct the Prosecuting Counsel to give the Respondents the documents because he is a Policeman, and pursuant to Section 243 (1) of the CPL it is only after the accused has elected to be tried in the High Court that the Magistrate can direct the Prosecuting Police Officer to transmit the case file to the Attorney - General, who will then direct the DPP and other law officers in his office, to prepare the proofs of evidence. Apparently, the respondents and the two Lower Courts jumped the gun. The respondents had not been asked or elected to be tried in the High Court, where they would have gotten the documents as a matter of right. They will have to go back to the finishing line and start all over again. 

 

Nevertheless, any person charged with a criminal offence is entitled to be given adequate time and facilities to prepare for his defence. This is the main thrust or a precursor of adjournments. Therefore, an accused person is entitled to an adjournment in order to secure the services of a defence counsel or the attendance of Witnesses in his defence. However, the grant of adjournment depends on the circumstances of each particular case. The Accused person is not entitled to continuous adjournments without reasonable cause. Therefore, the refusal of an adjournment after repeated adjournments is not ab into a violation of an accused person right to adequate time to prepare for his defence. In the trial of capital offences, the court must grant an adjournment once the accused persons defence Counsel is absent from the Court. In other cases, adjournment is at the discretion of the court. (Udo V State), this is usually when there is cogent and compelling reason to do so. The Court may therefore exercise its discretion and grant an adjournment. 

 

TRIAL ON SUMMARY COURTS 

Summary court means courts of summary jurisdiction to entertain and adjudicate Criminal causes before it with the ease of speed, and not following a formal, rigorous process of preferring a charge or filing an information after obtaining leave of a Judge. Summary courts of Jurisdiction are so ascribed by law, and a court cannot assume this jurisdiction without an enabling law. Hence the whole bulk of trial, no matter how well it is conducted will becomes a nullity. Examples of summary courts include; Area Customary Court,Revenue Court, Magistrate’s court, coroner, Juvenile court,and other summary court of jurisdiction established by law. It can be further added that before the locus clasico case of Ebele, it was erroneously believed that the proof of evidence( all documents in possession of the prosecution, whether intended to tender or not) can only be made available to the accused when he must first establish that there were discrepancies between a witness' previous statement to the police and his testimony see Layonu vs State (1967) 1 ALL NLR 198 citing with approval the case of R v Clarke 22 Cr. App. R 58. Or and if the accused elected to be tried in the High Court. The law is now clear that all these requirements erroneously conceded at the summary court is no longer tenable in our courts, because given those preconditions by the summary courts breaches the accused right to a fair trial. This is fundamental, as the accused person could be facing the loss of his life or personal liberty. “There is nothing in Section 36 (6) (b) of the Constitution that restricts its application to either a summary trial or a trial on information or provides for a condition precedent to its application. 

 

With the greatest respect to the learned Justices of the court below, having held that the evidence against the appellant, including the statements of witnesses to the Police, were part of the facilities that would aid him in the preparation of his defence, ought to have stopped there and dismissed the appeal." Per KEKEREEKUN, J.S.C. In EBELE OKOYE & ORS v.COMMISSIONER OF POLICE & ORS (2015) LPELR-24675(SC) The above provision of the 1999 Constitution means that adequate time and facilities shall be given to every person charged with a criminal offence for the preparation of his defence. The Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999 did not state that this is applicable only to persons who are charged with a criminal offence in the High Courts. It says to every person charged with a criminal offence. 

 

It is now settled law that it does not therefore matter which court the person is charged with a criminal offence. By virtue of that provision of the 1999 Constitution of Nigeria once a person is charged with a criminal offence he is entitled to the facilities for the preparation of his defence." In resolving the issue the Court held at page 71 thus: "The Court has a discretionary power to order the production of any document including such statement, if such production is necessary in the interest of justice. Although, the trial at the Lower Court in the case is a summary trial, but the defence is entitled in my view, since they have applied, to be given copies of the statements made by the prosecution witnesses as one of the facilities they require for the preparation of their defence as provided by Section 36 (6) (b) of the 1999 Constitution." Moreso, this settled the issue more so as the Supreme Court went further to point out that the Constitution is the grundnorm and fundamental law of the land which is supreme over all other laws. For instance, if Order 3 Rule 2 (1) of the High Court of Anambra State (Civil Procedure) Rules, 2006 and the various High Court Civil Procedure Rules provide for front - loading of documents to enable a defendant know what the claim against him entails so as to enable him prepare for his defence, how much more is it expected of the prosecution to provide the necessary facilities to a person accused of an offence to enable him prepare his defence. The prosecution by making available the facilities the appellant demanded in the notice to produce will help clear the air on the allegation made against Mr. B. A. Onwuemekaghi, the prosecuting counsel of what can be described as his partisanship and his becoming an agent of a wrong - doer in the pursuit of a private vendetta. The moment an accused person is facing a charge, his personal liberty is at stake and before that liberty is taken away, he must be afforded every opportunity to defend himself.

 

 It is immaterial whether he elects to be tried summarily or for information, once he becomes aware that he has a charge hanging over his neck for an infraction of the law and makes a request either orally or in writing for any facilities to prepare for his defence, the court must accede to his request and the prosecution has to comply. In Fawehinmi v. Inspector-General of Police (2002) 7 NWLR 606, Uwaifo JSC expressed the view on page 681 that- ".... in a proper investigation procedure, it is unlawful to arrest unless there is sufficient evidence upon which to charge and caution a suspect. It is completely wrong to arrest, let alone caution a suspect, before the police look for evidence implicating him." In the Ebele’s case the notice to produce, which the appellant filed at the Magistrate's Court Awka, he clearly spelt out in item 12 that he needed a copy of all routine police reports concerning the instant case which excluded legal opinions from the Attorney - General's Chambers. I wish to say that compliance with Section 36 (6) (b) of the Constitution is not subject to Section 243, 244, 245, 246 and 247 of the Criminal Procedure Law of Anambra State. When a person is accused of an offence and requests for facilities to enable him prepare his defence, and the facilities in question are statements of witnesses, it will suffice if the prosecution makes available photocopies of the statements. The court below was clearly in error when it made the election of the appellant to be tried on information as a condition precedent to exercising his right to request for facilities to prepare his defence." Per AKA'AHS, J.S.C. (Pp. 27-35, paras. A-F)

 

RIGHT TO ADEQUATE FACILITIES AND OTHER INTERNATIONAL INSTRUMENTS

 

The right to adequate time and facilities for the preparation of the accused's defence is contained in Article 14 (30 ( b) of the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights, Article 8 (20) (c) of the American Convention on Human Rights, and Article 6 (3) (b) of the European Convention for the protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. it is a fundamental aspect of the principle of "equality of arms" discussed in the Commentary to Article 62 of the MCCP. According to General Comment no.13 of the United Nations Human Rights Committee, "what is adequate time" depends on the circumstances of each case" (paragraph 9). it will also largely depend on the complexity of the case. As to the concept of facilities ,the United Nations Human Rights Committee in General Comment stated that "facilities must include access to documents and other evidence which the accused requires to prepare his case, as well as the opportunity to engage and communicate with counsel". Thus, the right to prepare a defence is related to the right to communicate with counsel set out in article 70. The right to the preparation of a defence is also related to the disclosure regime established under the MCCP because this is the mechanism by which the prosecution must give the accused and his or her counsel relevant information to prepare the accused's defence. Reference should be made to chapter 10, part 3 which provides the obligations on the prosecution to disclose the indictment and other evidence to the defence pending a confirmation hearing, and Chapter 10, part 4, which sets out the pretrial disclosure regime applicable under the MCCP. where the defence believes that it has been granted insufficient time to prepare a defence, it may make a motion to the court under Article 203 (40) for an adjournment.

 

 

THE CONSEQUENCES TO BREACH THIS RIGHT

 

 The breach of this principle no matter how the proceeding was conduct will amount to a nullity. It is the law that on appeal will occasioned trial denovo (start afresh from the trial court). 

It is pertinent to note that equal opportunities for both the prosecution and the defence entails strict compliance with the principle of adequate time and facilities to the accused to defend his case. Thus the prosecutor will not be allowed to have sole access to evidence. In a situation where the accused person does not know the case he will meet, while the prosecution knows everything concerning the case against the accused ahead of time, amounts to nothing less than procedural inequality which is a gross violation of the principle of fair hearing or fair trial and is tantamount to a violation of the said Section 36 (6) of the Constitution.

 

Broadly speaking, the Court had extended the interpretation of fair hearing from the perspective of a mere adherence to the twin pillars of justice so as to include anything improperly done during the trial which may cause an unbiased by-stander to feel that justice has not been done. See the case of Amamchukwu v. F.R.N. (2009) 8 NWLR (pt. 1144) 475 at 486 where Tabai, JSC extended the concept and said:"??It encompasses not only the compliance with the rules of natural justice, but also audi alteram partem. It also entails doing in the course of trial, whether civil or criminal, all things which will make an impartial observer leave the Court room with the belief that the trial has been balanced and fair on both sides to the trial." 

 

"The term fair hearing therefore has been defined variously by this Court to mean trial conducted according to all legal rules formulated to ensure that justice is done to all parties to the case. See Ogunsanya v. The State (2011) 12 NWLR (pt. 1261) 401 at 434; also Ugoru v. State (2002) 4 SC (P 11) 13 at 19 where U. A. Kalgo, JSC said:-"... the term 'fair hearing' in relation to a case in my view, means that trial to the case of the conduct of the proceedings thereof, is in accordance with the relevant law and rules in order to ensure justice and fairness ..."

 

CONCLUSION, fair trial entails that every party should be given equal opportunity to establish his case and no party should be prejudice. The breach of this principle no matter how the proceeding was conduct will amount to a nullity. It is the law that on appeal will occasioned trial denovo (start afresh from the trial court). However, when an order of a retrial will occasioned to a substantial miscarriage of justice, the accused will be discharged and acquitted under the various laws. 

 

 


© Copyright 2018 Calabar E. Daniel. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments: