Not The Type

Reads: 44  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 2

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: February 28, 2017

A A A | A A A

Submitted: February 28, 2017

A A A

A A A


Not The Type

 

I came across this photo the other day and boy, did it bring back memories. I suddenly found myself wondering how many Booksie writers have ever actually had the debatable pleasure of writing using a type-writer. I am going to own up to having owned three different models in the past.

 

The first model I owned was, ironically, the most modern. It was bright orange in color, made of light-weight plastic and was really portable. The second was a big old metal thing that was no where near as portable, weighing at least three times as much as my first one. And then there was ‘The Beast’! Rescued from an office that was modernizing it’s equipment, it not only weighed a ton but made quite a lot of noise too as it was an electric one.

 

The first thing about typing is loading the paper. I know you have to load paper into a printer but all you have to do there is grab some sheets, make sure they’re straight and pop it all in the slot. With the typewriters, first you had to release the carriage, then put in a sheet of paper, position it by hand, straighten it, put the paper guide in place then readjust the carriage. You want reference copies.....no problem, slip in some carbon paper and an extra sheet; don’t bother trying for more than two extra copies at a time. And if you want another good, top copy be prepared to type it again.

 

Fonts......forget it! Basic lettering, with a key to press down for the capitals. Some models did have an option for italics though, and some had three color ribbons, meaning you could type in black, blue or red all by selecting a position on a switch.

 

The later typewriters had keys similar to those on your average laptop, but older models had keys that you had to put effort in to press down. Okay, you didn’t have to press hard but the angle your hands needed to be held at could certainly lead to wrist strain.

 

The biggest difference though is in how you can now cope with mistakes or other changes. You type a wrong letter -- just delete, correct and on you go. Typewriters had no such option. You could get erasers, but if you rubbed too hard you’d make a hole, then you'd write in the correction. I never managed to be able to place the paper accurately enough to be able to type it in. Then there was the liquid paper, and later still, correction strips, but none of them could in any way compete with the ease of making corrections now.

 

And if you felt your sentences, your paragraphs were out of order; if you wanted to add a new piece of writing – pull the paper from the machine and start all over again. That’s where those lovely images of writers with their waste-paper bins overflowing with screwed up paper sheets comes from.

 

Would I like to use a type-writer again? Nope! They might look nostalgic but only until you realize just what a pain they really are to use!


© Copyright 2017 hullabaloo22. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments:

Comments

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply