A Cry for Indonesian Atheist

Reads: 66  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 1

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: True Confessions  |  House: Booksie Classic
This is for the Indonesian atheists out there and for atheists in general

Submitted: March 10, 2017

A A A | A A A

Submitted: March 10, 2017

A A A

A A A


A Cry for Indonesian Atheists

 

 

Hi there.

I assume you are a fellow atheist like me.

I assume your life is mostly fine, but somehow you feel there’s something lacking.

Yeah, I know that feeling.

That feeling is our lack of validation, of recognition, by the State.

 

Most of us Indonesian atheist are first generation atheists.

We were not born into it. We mostly grew out of something else.

We are a bunch of apostates so to speak.

I’m inclined to see us more than a bunch.

I’m inclined to see us more as a fellowship.

 

Yes, we are not married to one another.

We don’t give financial support to one another.

We may not even like each other as a person. 

Different hobbies, interest, personality, etc.

 

Still this one thing unite us above all other thing that divide us

The Truth

And if you feel as strongly as me about the Truth

So much so that we are willing to sacrifice our comfort,

our relationships, our security

 

Than yes, we should be united

We should feel proud, have a bit of a pride of being atheists

We should feel a sense of real accomplishment

For it is really easy just to ignore common sense

and just follow the herd sense

To be part of the herd

 

To oblige, to obey, to succumb to the opinion

of our parents, families and friends

But you, yes you,

You chose a different path

 

You are a truth seeker, seeking the real Truth of the matters

You are a faith surfer, surfing faith like some surfing the Internet

You are a rebel, with your private and very personal rebellion

You are the wonderers, who wonder ‘How the hell people fell for that one?’

You are the book readers, the the lovers of wisdom, the critical thinkers,

You are the outsiders, who yes, looking outside the box, or the religion you’re born in, in this case

You are the outcasts, you want to be, you need to be an outcast if the Truth is also a fellow outcast

You are the bad men and women, who questions authority, who questions everything

And with all the reasoning power you have, all the evidence, you come to atheism and you can’t let go, you won’t let go, and why, you shouldn’t let go

for atheism is the way to go

 

What does it mean to be an atheist, really?

For me it simply means refusing to believe just for the sake of believing

That I find it offensive when someone, when everyone said 

‘It is what it is. Take it. Don’t question it.’

 

In an ideal world, or at least if you or me live in a country full of atheists

This writing would never need to be made

I’m not a good writer, and I prefer to read better, much better writers

People like Mill and Hume, Nietzsche and Russell, Dawkins and Harris, Ayaan and Rushdie, 

and to laugh wholeheartedly listening to Maher, Carlin and Gervais make fun of religious concepts 

and people

They are my heroes, idols, good and great people in general

 

Unfortunately in this world, in this country, this writing have to be made

And as much as I admire them, they are not affected by what affect us

We have our own struggle friends! That’s what I’ve been trying to say

We are not Americans, not British nor German, not Dutch, we are Indonesians

We are born and bred here in Indonesia, in Jakarta, Bandung, Depok, Padang, 

wherever you came from (can’t list all the cities)

And we need, yes we do, we need to stand our ground, to unite! 

To act locally to define, to discuss, to progress the undeniable Indonesian atheist movement. 

Right here in this motherland, fatherland, and one day maybe our kidland, grandkidland of ours.

 

So why now?

Because this is the 2017th birthday of Jesus Christ, for Christ’s sake!

This is 2017, and Enlightment happen centuries ago! 

Shouldn’t we all be Enlightened by now? 

2017 Dear Sir and Madam!

we shouldn’t no longer have to feel or think or act as if we are second class citizen

and in this we should join hand in hand as those people persecuted or ignored because

 they believe in their gods other than the ones in those five or six ‘accepted’, ‘acknowledged’, 

‘valid’, ‘official’ religions!

 

Come on, how in the name of everything can we let this non-sense go on?

 And still call ourselves rational men and women

Everyone, everywhere has the inherent right to believe and not to believe in anything they want

If a government take away that right or ignoring it, people should stand up, protest and do petition, 

do appeal, do whatever it takes to make the government grant the rights

Is it possible that we may get hurt in the process of legally getting our rights? Absolutely.

Is it worth it? Absolutely. (Is it?)

 

No progress of human dignity has ever been made without some blood, sweat and tears plus toil, 

and yes that is a lot to ask

For every single religion now admitted, someone must have made a big sacrifice 

And while we are non-violent, there is a very big possibility that we will encounter violence, jail time, 

torture, and so much more pain than we could possibly expected to endure from the opposing side

So be afraid, be really really really afraid and then

Getting really really really fed up of being afraid, of lacking courage, of cowing

That you, that we, finally and permanently decided to stand up, speak up, driving forward

To get our full civil rights

 

Gandhi, Mandela, Martin Luther King, Jr, all those women suffragette movement,

the LGBT movement, some freethinker guy named Giordano Bruno centuries ago

they all suffer, I mean seriously suffered and so so so many died for worthy causes of human dignity

and equality

look up to them, be inspired, and hence be compelled to act

 

As The Ancient One said to the Doctor, ‘It’s not about you.’

(from Doctor Strange, you watch that one don’t you?)

This struggle of us, is not just about me or you or a thousand of us

It’s about what’s right

It’s about what’s right

It’s about what’s right

It’s about supporting the generation of Indonesian atheists that is yet to come

and maybe a bit about us too and to provide closure to the previous generations of atheists 

who have had to spend their whole lives in closet

(And it’s unpleasant living your whole lives in closet, isn’t? Not to mention inauthentic?)

It may even, one might hope, help create an Atheist Spring, if you will, though hopefully with 

better consequence and less turmoil than that other recent spring-themed movement

Imagine that, an Atheist Spring across the globe

 

It’s about our civil rights

The rights of us as citizens of this great nation to political and social freedom and equality

 

Indonesia is great

It is the greatest country in the world

(If other country can claim to be the greatest, why can’t we?)

We can make it greater still

By saving its very soul (as MLK, Jr said ‘our struggle is not just about black, it’s the struggle to save America’s soul)

Because our country is wrong on some key issues and that wrong must be made right

The US has struggle for a very long time about race (still do)

The UK once struggle about homosexuality (Turing, anyone? The guy played by Ben Cumberbatch)

Our struggle here in RI as atheist is about the open acceptance and validation of atheism as a personal conviction and way of life and death

 

Not all of us atheist want to be cremated, that doesn’t mean we have to accept our gravestone to be falsely marked as Muslim or Christian, etc,

not because we despise them, but because it’s simply not true for us and it’s simply will not be right by us

As atheists we don’t believe in the afterlife or rebirth, sure, fine

But a funeral and a gravestone is not about death, it’s a testament of who we were

and as anyone else who ever visit a grave can testify

The most fundamental identifier of a person in a graveyard is not their race, country, ethnicity, gender, education or occupation

It’s what they lived believing in, thus

It matters, it matters a lot

Just as we don’t want to live a lie and in hiding, we don’t want to die a lie and in hiding

It’s a basic dignity that should be granted to every human being past, present and future

And it is a dignity that we’re striving and fighting for to be granted to us right now in 2017 in this Republic of Indonesia, or at least we should be, together

I have a dream that one day being an atheist in Indonesia is such a non-issue that people of that time will even forget about what we have to endure, just like

kids these days take the Internet and mobile phone for granted

When will that one day be? Somewhere in the year 2027? 2037? 2117?

 

We must see ourselves from now on (if not already, and if not from now on maybe soon?)

As part of that long march of progress of universal civil rights movement

Encompassing of every single person who ever feel the pain of being ignored

Out of the ignorance of the powers that be

 

Bottom line is

We only demand the Indonesian government and the people to validate what is justly ours already; to say our name, recognize our name,

and allow us the basic dignity and right to live and die with our name: Indonesian atheists

 

Signed, Al Riz

 

 

And now the not so simple and fiery part, the practical part.

 

As many of you (if not all) feel when we finally cannot deny the atheism that grows in us, as our mind and heart failed to find validity in our birth religion (and any other religions afterwards, for those who done faithsurfing and truthseeking the hard way), when we finished with the ‘what’s wrong with me?’ phase and stop doubting our conclusions, we asked ourselves two simple questions:

 

What now? and, What must change?

 

These questions turned into some tangible and intangible parts.

 

The Tangible Parts

 

The tangible parts are the rituals. Now when people go to Friday prayer, you don’t go

or if you do go (understandable, I done this a lot of times before finally stopping for good) you do it out of a bit of fear (of what friends, family, and strangers might say) but 

with no belief whatsoever, it’s like you go to a city hall assembly with people doing stretching for five minutes and a bit of water sprinkling all over their body before they go 

back doing whatever it is they’re doing

Either way fine do that

 

And when people fast for thirty days (some of the religious don’t fast but they feel they done a sin), you simply eat openly (because eating is a private business) or somehow 

being considerate to them and saving yourself from awkwardness, you eat quietly, during the day.

 

Since I’m a Muslim by birth (and by name still, though if every atheist must change name to an atheist sounding name, I profess I have no idea. I would like that but so far people are okay with their birth-religion-based name), I don’t know specifically how atheist from Christians, Catholics, Buddhists, and Hindus and Confucians background struggles with their religious surrounding but for most case maybe it can’t be

 worst than ex-Muslims’. Since Islam has the harshest punishment for apostasy. Though in my own family, there is no great waves. People just mind their own business, like they always do.

 

The KTP (ID card) problem. This one is as big or as small as you put your mind to it. And I do both. When I seriously contemplate, I feel it’s very much unfair for atheists and 

other religious minorities to have to put up with these nonsensical regulation. Thus I asked a few times to the kelurahan (county level government) to change my status from Islam to atheist or at least a blank status on the religion column. But they quickly just said it can’t be done. And since I don’t want to make much fuss about it, I could at least said I tried, I tried twice in a civil way. Twice is enough to understand that they don’t want you to change you religion status easily. I don’t think they do it out of spite (or if they do, they don’t show it). It’s just the way they are. And since ‘atheism’ is officially ignored, well they as the officials should, as consequence, ignore it too. So I get it. I understand their point of view. Just like I can understand any other nonsensical point of view.

 

So now, the word Islam on my ID card is basically a nonsensical word. It’s meaningless for me yet it’s there. So to keep myself from being constantly annoyed by this official slight, I tried to see it with humor. Like maybe my religion is ‘I slam’ or ‘is Lam’. But this is useless. I still feel pissed. So I tried to wipe it off with some detergent and it works, but I fear if I wipe it off completely I will somehow get into some legal trouble (after all it is a legal document), so I wipe it just enough for people who need to see it to see it but not so obvious. But I still dislike it. So I do the ultimate non-zero-sum game or win-win for me and the government. I just put a white sticker on top of the religion column (I add another white sticker and color it blue), so voila, as long as I have no business showing the card to someone I simply put the sticker on. As someone in Hidden Figures said,’What I can change, I change. What I can’t, I endure.’ KTP is definitely one that I can change, although it’s informal. And it makes me feel pretty good actually. For now.

 

Ditto with KK (family card). At least your copy. 

 

Other than that, nothing really change in reality, in practice. I am not a different person just because I change sides. I still sleep in the same bed, talk with the same people, eat the same thing, liking the same stuff. I only lose the rituals, the feeling of guilt and sin and a few religious words I used to say. I don’t lose much materially. I still use the word ‘ente’ (you) way more often than most (all) people I know eventhough it feels somewhat Arabic (it is a loan word) and somehow it quickly feels Islamic, but what can I say, the word stuck. Sometimes the word ‘kamu’ and ‘lu’ just don’t do justice to the context.

 

If you have spouse and kids it can be tricky. But my wife is irreligious meaning indifferent meaning unconcerned about religion. So she’s very taking it easy on the ID card, the religious greeting, and on the gravestone stuff. But she obviously don’t do the rituals and fasting. My kids don’t go to school, they are unschooled. But even if they go to school, what with the requisite religious study I think I have no other option but to call it off. In school they never asked the students ‘What do you think is the right religion of these six official religions’ to start enquiries equipped with critical thinking. They just fed them with dogmas. And I’m sure I don’t want my kids or anyone kids for that matter to be forced to choose which dogma they want to be indoctrinated in. Yuck.

 

Now, here’s where questions arise again. Should we take it easy? Should we take the way the government treat us easily or should we take offense and be serious to make real ever lasting legal change?

 

The argument for taking it easy is because everything is physically okay. No one really bothers me. I’m safe. Our struggle is very much lackluster compared to other civil rights movements because none of our tangible rights has been taken from us. I mean we are not really second class. There is no ‘religious-only toilet’ vs ‘atheist-only’ toilet anywhere in Indonesia (or in the world, I think?, at least not yet). There is simply no way of doing that. Contrast that to other civil rights movement. Women suffrage is real, they want equality, to vote, foremost. Black movement of course is real, away from slavery and second-class treatment. LGBT is real, for same-sex marriage and all. But as atheist, we can still vote, enjoy all the rights of a citizen albeit with that few little annoying letters in our ID card. But it’s a small price to pay (literally and figuratively) for the convenience of not having to ‘waste’ our time, energy, and money to protest, march, appeal, etc.

 

On the one hand this is true. I think I’m not alone when I say struggling is hard. Struggling is long. Struggling needs meeting, funding, leadership, fellowship, protests, action, sacrifice. And we, we are not just atheist, right? Most of us, like most of the billions of people living right now, we don’t want to be defined by our religion or lack of, gender, race, nationality. We want to be defined by our calling, our work and our accomplishment. We are workers, students, athletes, moviegoers, travellers, bloggers, activists. We have our own lives. Just like a Muslim don’t seek out fellow Muslim for the sake of both of them being Muslims, we shouldn’t seek out one another just because we are all atheists. Well this reasoning is both right and not quite right. The right part you already get, but the not quite right part might need a little explaining:

 

Because Muslims are already recognized, common and have no struggle in this country on the matter of belief, it will be absurd for me if I’m a Muslim to want to reach out with every Muslim I know. Basically everyone I know in my neighborhood, the market, in school and college and office are Muslims. There is no need for A Cry to Indonesian Muslims. The same thing if I’m an atheist born and bred in a relatively atheist-friendly country like Russia and China and the majority of Western countries where atheist are just as common and have no struggle with validation and recognition from the authority.

 

But atheists, especially avowed atheists in Indonesia, now that’s a fantastic beast that is rare to find my friend. Here in Indonesia we are rare and we share the common annoyance, if you will, of things related to our atheism from the very personal to the most public things. In my two year of being an atheist I have only met one other avowed atheist (I was an agnostic prior to that for four years and irreligious for four years before that) and his story is much more heroic to hear. He said he has to hide his atheism from his girlfriend. He admits it’s inauthentic to do so but he can’t risk of losing her just like he has lost his previous girlfriends due to different ‘religious’ belief. So it’s not simple. On one hand he is an avowed atheist whose Twitter account clearly showed who he is yet at the same time somehow his girlfriend managed not to know about it and he managed to conceal it. This is funny yet tragic story isn’t? We usually conceal something that either shameful or dangerous. Our friend here surely think his atheism is dangerous for his romantic relationship. And really being an atheist should not be any of those things. Not here, not anywhere. And it’s our collective job really to make sure that the next generation of Indonesian atheists have no reason to hesitate in saying who they are and what they believed in openly to anyone, romantic relationship or otherwise. But for now, do whatever works for you. Seriously. When Muslims allowed themselves to deceive the enemy by saying they’re not a Muslim when under threat, that shows how paramount being alive and secure is. As an atheist we have no ‘higher’ authority to answer to. Meaning, as long as we do no harm to other, we don’t have to face threats. But then again it’s hard. I’ve been in some situation where I should lie just to make my life easier but I stand my ground, meaning I said the truth, that I’m an atheist.

 

So yes, I think the two main requirement needed as solid reason to be united in a civil right cause is present. We are citizens of a democratic republican nation that has not recognized and validated our way of life as equal before the law as any other way of life. So when I meet you, fellow Indonesian atheist, I meet a very special person who knows what it’s like being one of us. Knowing and helping one another should neither be considered absurd nor a secondary concern. If we build up network for practically every other area of our life, how reasonable can it be that we leave networking for our deepest conviction out?

 

As you may already know, some of us are already on the move to make Indonesian atheists visible, even longer than I become an atheist. Notably Karl, the creator of the Indonesian Atheist group and Aan, the atheist who got jailed for two years, mainly just because of questioning Islam. Plus so many more people that I might not even be aware of. So where are we as a people. Are we content with where we are socially, legally, and politically? Should we do more? Should we make our concern via art? Make a comic, make a youtube video, a short film, a documentary, songs, etc? Should we make a petition? Does it work that way? Should we somehow, like Loving, get a lawyer and go to the Supreme Court? Could it possibly be that there is not one atheist that happen to be a good lawyer here? And what will the Supreme Court say about atheist rights? On one hand, the Universal Human Rights said we all have the rights to believe whatever we want to including not believing any deity. On the other hand, this country is founded by people who cater to only several official religions, which funnily enough not recognizing Judaism as a religion eventhough as all Koran-reading Muslims knows Islam itself acknowledge Judaism as one and all Catholics and Christians basically pray to a Jewish guy (or family since Mary is a Jewish woman). So the constitution of this country in regard to religion is a joke right from the start, and it is a joke that actually enforce a belief in a deity. So strictly speaking I could see the Supreme Court arguing that it is not unconstitutional for the State to continue to ignore us, to refuse any acknowledgment of us even existing. For better or for worse back in 1945, there is not an atheist around to include us. Can we somehow make amendment? How many atheist is there? If there’s like only 5,000 of us, in a country of more than 200,000,000 people (1:40,000) can we do anything?

 

You know, when I’m a Muslim my problem is taking fairy tales too seriously.A Cry for Indonesian Atheists

 

 

Hi there.

I assume you are a fellow atheist like me.

I assume your life is mostly fine, but somehow you feel there’s something lacking.

Yeah, I know that feeling.

That feeling is our lack of validation, of recognition, by the State.

 

Most of us Indonesian atheist are first generation atheists.

We were not born into it. We mostly grew out of something else.

We are a bunch of apostates so to speak.

I’m inclined to see us more than a bunch.

I’m inclined to see us more as a fellowship.

 

Yes, we are not married to one another.

We don’t give financial support to one another.

We may not even like each other as a person. 

Different hobbies, interest, personality, etc.

 

Still this one thing unite us above all other thing that divide us

The Truth

And if you feel as strongly as me about the Truth

So much so that we are willing to sacrifice our comfort,

our relationships, our security

 

Than yes, we should be united

We should feel proud, have a bit of a pride of being atheists

We should feel a sense of real accomplishment

For it is really easy just to ignore common sense

and just follow the herd sense

To be part of the herd

 

To oblige, to obey, to succumb to the opinion

of our parents, families and friends

But you, yes you,

You chose a different path

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are a truth seeker, seeking the real Truth of the matters

You are a faith surfer, surfing faith like some surfing the Internet

You are a rebel, with your private and very personal rebellion

You are the wonderers, who wonder ‘How the hell people fell for that one?’

You are the book readers, the the lovers of wisdom, the critical thinkers,

You are the outsiders, who yes, looking outside the box, or the religion you’re born in, in this case

You are the outcasts, you want to be, you need to be an outcast if the Truth is also a fellow outcast

You are the bad men and women, who questions authority, who questions everything

And with all the reasoning power you have, all the evidence, you come to atheism and you can’t let go, you won’t let go, and why, you shouldn’t let go

for atheism is the way to go

 

What does it mean to be an atheist, really?

For me it simply means refusing to believe just for the sake of believing

That I find it offensive when someone, when everyone said 

‘It is what it is. Take it. Don’t question it.’

 

In an ideal world, or at least if you or me live in a country full of atheists

This writing would never need to be made

I’m not a good writer, and I prefer to read better, much better writers

People like Mill and Hume, Nietzsche and Russell, Dawkins and Harris, Ayaan and Rushdie, and to laugh wholeheartedly listening to Maher, Carlin and Gervais make fun of religious concepts and people

They are my heroes, idols, good and great people in general

 

Unfortunately in this world, in this country, this writing have to be made

And as much as I admire them, they are not affected by what affect us

We have our own struggle friends! That’s what I’ve been trying to say

We are not Americans, not British nor German, not Dutch, we are Indonesians

We are born and bred here in Indonesia, in Jakarta, Bandung, Depok, Padang, wherever you come from (can’t list all the cities)

And we need, yes we do, we need to stand our ground, to unite! 

To act locally to define, to discuss, to progress the undeniable Indonesian atheist movement. Right here in this motherland, fatherland, and one day maybe our kidland, grandkidland of ours.

 

So why now?

Because this is the 2017th birthday of Jesus Christ, for Christ’s sake!

This is 2017, and Enlightment happen centuries ago! 

Shouldn’t we all be Enlightened by now? 

2017 Dear Sir and Madam!

we shouldn’t no longer have to feel or think or act as if we are second class citizen

and in this we should join hand in hand as those people persecuted or ignored because they believe in their gods other than the ones in those five or six ‘accepted’, ‘acknowledged’, ‘valid’, ‘official’ religions!

 

Come on, how in the name of everything can we let this non-sense go on? And still call ourselves rational men and women

Everyone, everywhere has the inherent right to believe and not to believe in anything they want

If a government take away that right or ignoring it, people should stand up, protest and do petition, do appeal, do whatever it takes to make the government grant the rights

Is it possible that we may get hurt in the process of legally getting our rights? Absolutely.

Is it worth it? Absolutely. (Is it?)

 

No progress of human dignity has ever been made without some blood, sweat and tears plus toil, and yes that is a lot to ask

For every single religion now admitted, someone must have made a big sacrifice 

And while we are non-violent, there is a very big possibility that we will encounter violence, jail time, torture, and so much more pain than we could possibly expected to endure from the opposing side

So be afraid, be really really really afraid and then

Getting really really really fed up of being afraid, of lacking courage, of cowing

That you, that we, finally and permanently decided to stand up, speak up, driving forward

To get our full civil rights

 

Gandhi, Mandela, Martin Luther King, Jr, all those women suffragette movement,

the LGBT movement, some freethinker guy named Bruno centuries ago

they all suffer, I mean seriously suffered and so so so many died for worthy causes of human dignity and equality

look up to them, be inspired, and hence be compelled to act

 

As The Ancient One said to the Doctor, ‘It’s not about you.’ (from Doctor Strange, you watch that one don’t you?)

This struggle of us, is not just about me or you or a thousand of us

It’s about what’s right

It’s about what’s right

It’s about what’s right

It’s about supporting the generation of Indonesian atheists that is yet to come

and maybe a bit about us too and to provide closure to the previous generations of atheists who have had to spend their whole lives in closet

(And it’s unpleasant living your whole lives in closet, isn’t? Not to mention inauthentic?)

It may even, one might hope, help create an Atheist Spring, if you will, though hopefully with better consequence and less turmoil than that other recent spring-themed movement

Imagine that, an Atheist Spring across the globe

 

 

It’s about our civil rights

The rights of us as citizens of this great nation to political and social freedom and equality

 

 

Indonesia is great

It is the greatest country in the world

(If other country can claim to be the greatest, why can’t we?)

We can make it greater still

By saving its very soul (as MLK, Jr said ‘our struggle is not just about black, it’s the struggle to save America’s soul)

Because our country is wrong on some key issues and that wrong must be made right

The US has struggle for a very long time about race (still do)

The UK once struggle about homosexuality (Turing, anyone? The guy played by Ben Cumberbatch)

Our struggle here in RI as atheist is about the open acceptance and validation of atheism as a personal conviction and way of life and death

 

Not all of us atheist want to be cremated, that doesn’t mean we have to accept our gravestone to be falsely marked as Muslim or Christian, etc, not because we despise them, but because it’s simply not true for us and it’s simply will not be right by us

As atheists we don’t believe in the afterlife or rebirth, sure, fine

But a funeral and a gravestone is not about death, it’s a testament of who we were

and as anyone else who ever visit a grave can testify

The most fundamental identifier of a person in a graveyard is not their race, country, ethnicity, gender, education or occupation

It’s what they lived believing in, thus

It matters, it matters a lot

Just as we don’t want to live a lie and in hiding, we don’t want to die a lie and in hiding

It’s a basic dignity that should be granted to every human being past, present and future

And it is a dignity that we’re striving and fighting for to be granted to us right now in 2017 in this Republic of Indonesia, or at least we should be, together

I have a dream that one day being an atheist in Indonesia is such a non-issue that people of that time will even forget about what we have to endure, just like kids these days take the Internet and mobile phone for granted

When will that one day be? Somewhere in the year 2027? 2037? 2117?

 

We must see ourselves from now on (if not already, and if not from now on maybe soon?)

As part of that long march of progress of universal civil rights movement

Encompassing of every single person who ever feel the pain of being ignored

Out of the ignorance of the powers that be

 

Bottom line is

We only demand the Indonesian government and the people to validate what is justly ours already; to say our name, recognize our name, and allow us the basic dignity and right to live and die with our name: Indonesian atheists

 

Signed, Al Riz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


© Copyright 2018 Al Riz. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments:

Comments

avatar

Author
Reply