Marsin

Reads: 33  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Poetry  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: March 18, 2017

A A A | A A A

Submitted: March 18, 2017

A A A

A A A


 

Pak Marsin

 

Hei bro

Remember a few days ago 

When we were talking

About Marsin

 

Marsin is a sixty year old man

My brother is a twenty-one year old guy

My brother call Marsin by his name only

No ‘Sir’ or whatever

 

In Indonesian culture calling a person

Forty years older than you by name

Is unacceptable

It’s frowned upon

It can and will create visible rage

Unless

If the person you called by name

Is your pembantu (houseman)

 

Marsin was our houseman

And I used to call him by name too

Simply because it’s custom

It’s the accepted way of doing things

 

I never thought twice about it

I never thought that that wasn’t right

 

Until I watched some movies about the slavery

In the United States

Where the master’s family always calls the slaves

No matter their age

As boy

 

And right there and then

I saw a correlation 

I can’t deny

 

We were adapting the master’s way

Of calling his slaves

 

And that ain’t right

 

 

It’s not right in my mind

And it feels wrong in my heart

To take a good man’s dignity

Simply because he has less money

Than your family

 

Marsin

He is no subhuman 

He could and he might be

A better person than you and me

A better sibling than you and me

A better father than you and me

But you and I don’t see that

We only see him as our forever inferior

Right, brother?

 

How else can you justify to me

That you call a person the age of our father

By his name only

While you call your cousin a year older than you

with kak (big brother)

 

And these mistreatment happen

Nationwide, from a long long time ago

For some reason a polite nation

A Muslim-majority nation

That think of itself as valuing respect and dignity

Take these very thing

Away from millions upon millions of pembantu

(Of which most of them are their fellow Muslims

and all of them are their fellow Indonesians)

Every single day

Every single hour

 

For Marsin

He has been mistreated

Disrespected

Suffer indignity

For fifty years

At the hands of his master,

His master’s kids

And his master’s kids’ kids

Three generations of people

Who should have known better

As some are professors

Some are bankers

Some are lawyers

Some are doctors

 

As Black Eyed Peas asked,

Where is the love?

Where is the humanity?

Where is the common sense?

 

First of all

He didn’t asked to be poor

Second of all

He didn’t asked that there is no job in his village

So he must be away from his wife and three kids

To go to Jakarta

The very least we can do

Is to provide him with basic decency

Instead in our house

He lives in the ironing room

So there’s the iron table

And a very uncomfortable bed

 

Marsin

No more sin

To you 

Pak Marsin

 

Thank you for being there

For me, for my brother and sister

When my parents are away

 

Thank you for watching

The Incredible Hulk and Wonder Woman

With me

While feeding me rice and egg

 

Thank you for putting me to sleep

And staying in my room 

Because I was afraid of the dark

And there is no one else 

 

Thank you for wiping my ass

That one time 

I had these diarrhea

And I was too grossed out to

Clean myself

 

To tell you the truth

I think 

You’re too good for me

And my family

You deserved better

Better treatment

Better pay

Better lodgings

Less work

 

There is one of you

And six of us

And you have to serve

To cook, to iron, to go to the market,

Walk us to school, get us from school,

Etc, etc, etc

Inhumans that we were

And inhumans so many of us still are

 

I guess

still more sin

coming to you

and all the working class people

Pak Marsin


© Copyright 2017 Al Riz. All rights reserved.