Whitney M Young Jr

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
I am currently at a place called Job corp. Its located in Simpsonville Ky. The name is Whitney M Young Job Corp. So I decided to do some research and this is what I came up with.

Submitted: March 21, 2017

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Submitted: March 21, 2017

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Whitney M Young Jr

Whitney M Young Jr was born on July 31, 1921 In Shelby County Kentucky. Whitney was born to his father Whitney M. Young, Sr. and mother Laura Young. Both of his parents were very well educated. Whitney’s father was president of the Lincoln Institute (an African American preparatory school); while his mother a teacher became the first female postmistress, that position was given to her by President Franklin D. Roosevelt himself in the year 1940. Whitney would have been about 19 years old. Whitney graduated in 1937 from Lincoln Institute at age 16 he was a valedictorian. Whitney then went on to Kentucky State College where he became president of his senior class; he graduated in the year 1941 at age 20, With a Bachelor of Science degree in social work. Whitney’s dream then was to become a doctor. During World War 2 Whitney was trained in electrical engineering at MIT. After graduating MIT in 1944, Whitney was then assigned to a road construction crew of African-American soldiers led by white officers. Where he was soon promoted just a few short weeks later from private to first sergeant; in the all African-American 369th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Group, causing tension for both groups involved. Even with tension existing, Whitney was able to effectively act as a go-between for his white officers and African-American soldiers. Thus leading Whitney, into the challenges and interest in racial diplomacy. In 1946 at age 25 after Whitney’s discharge from the army, Whitney entered graduate school to study a career path in social work for race relations. At age 27, Whitney married his lover Margaret Buckner, he obtained his social work master's at University of Minnesota and graduated 1948. Where soon after Whitney went on to work a few short years with the Urban League of St. Paul, an organization that was working hard to place African Americans into what used to be previously white-only hiring positions. In 1950 at age 29, Whitney became the forefront of racial integration for agreeing to accept the role as an executive director of the National Urban League. In the middle of 1950 Whitney took the position as dean of Atlanta University's School of Social Work, Constantly involving himself in the Civil Rights Movement as well as leading the state branch of the NAACP. The League was a major factor in racially including employees for a variety of big-company jobs nationally. In 1961 age 40 Whitney was appointed the executive director of the National Urban League. Whitney had a knack for obtaining the support of the prominent white businessmen; Whitney soon became the instrument for saving the league from bankruptcy as well as repairing and maintaining the organization's structure which grandly increased its budget and staff size. In Whitney’s ten years as an executive director of the Urban League, he increased the number of its local chapters from 60 to98, and its staff from 500 employees to 1,200. Whitney obtained funding and grants from corporations, foundations, and the Johnson's administration. Whitney being politically aware had access to the U.S. presidential office and became a close confidant and aid to Lyndon B. Johnson. With the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Whitney developed an even stronger tie with President Lyndon. Before Lyndon left office in 1969 Whitney age 46 was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom. After President Nixon's inauguration in 69. Whitney modified his earlier position, whereas before he had been publicly critical of Martin Luther King's condemnation of the U.S. pursuit of the war in Vietnam. At the administration's request, Whitney visited South Vietnam. After Richard Nixon's inauguration in 1969 Whitney condemned the war in Vietnam. Only responding to the BPM(black power movement) and urban violence by concentrating resources on the young in the urban black underclass. Whitney continued to shun the black power rhetoric popular with new leaders of the (CRE)Congress of Racial Equality and the (SNCC)Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Whitney continued to have significant influence, serving on the boards of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, MIT, and the Rockefeller Foundation and as president of the National Conference on Social Welfare (1967) and of the National Association of Social Workers (1969-1971). Whitney was a writer having written the books To Be Equal (1964), Beyond Racism: Building an Open Society (1969). Whitney had also written a well-known newspaper column. Whitney’s wife Margaret being an author herself wrote books for children. While at a conference about the relations between Africa and the United States in Nigeria, Whitney went swimming with Former Attorney General Ramsey Clark and others in the Atlantic Ocean. While swimming Whitney suffered what is either thought to be a brain hemorrhage or heart attack and so he drowned. Whitney was pulled from the water by those who were with him but the efforts to bring Whitney back to life were to no avail. Whitney M. Young Jr died in March of 1971 at age 50 a good man, father and leader. He will always be remembered here, at Whitney M Young Job Corp Center.


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