The Cuban Embargo

The Cuban Embargo

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Summary

On February 3, 1962 the United States enacted an embargo on Cuba, an island nation off the coast of Florida. This embargo cuts off all trade and most travel to Cuba. But why; Why did we enact this embargo? Well the answer to that is simple. After the “U.S approved” dictator Fulgencio Batista was overthrown by Fidel Castro. The U.S stopped importing as much sugar (Cuba’s main export) from Cuba. This forced Cuba to go to the Soviet Union for support. Answering Cuba’s call, the Soviet Union began importing all the sugar the U.S didn’t and paying in oil. In response, the U.S government ordered all private U.S oil refineries operating in Cuba to refuse to refine Soviet oil. And they did, “U.S oil companies refused to refine soviet oil.” (Hornberger 19). This Caused Cuba to Nationalize (take) all the U.S oil refineries. Furious, the U.S enacted the embargo.
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Summary

On February 3, 1962 the United States enacted an embargo on Cuba, an island nation off the coast of Florida. This embargo cuts off all trade and most travel to Cuba. But why; Why did we enact this embargo? Well the answer to that is simple. After the “U.S approved” dictator Fulgencio Batista was overthrown by Fidel Castro. The U.S stopped importing as much sugar (Cuba’s main export) from Cuba. This forced Cuba to go to the Soviet Union for support. Answering Cuba’s call, the Soviet Union began importing all the sugar the U.S didn’t and paying in oil. In response, the U.S government ordered all private U.S oil refineries operating in Cuba to refuse to refine Soviet oil. And they did, “U.S oil companies refused to refine soviet oil.” (Hornberger 19). This Caused Cuba to Nationalize (take) all the U.S oil refineries. Furious, the U.S enacted the embargo.

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Submitted: March 26, 2017

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The Cuban Embargo

On February 3, 1962 the United States enacted an embargo on Cuba, an island nation off the coast of Florida. This embargo cuts off all trade and most travel to Cuba. But why; Why did we enact this embargo? Well the answer to that is simple. After the “U.S approved” dictator Fulgencio Batista was overthrown by Fidel Castro. The U.S stopped importing as much sugar (Cuba’s main export) from Cuba. This forced Cuba to go to the Soviet Union for support. Answering Cuba’s call, the Soviet Union began importing all the sugar the U.S didn’t and paying in oil. In response, the U.S government ordered all private U.S oil refineries operating in Cuba to refuse to refine Soviet oil. And they did, “U.S oil companies refused to refine soviet oil.” (Hornberger 19). This Caused Cuba to Nationalize (take) all the U.S oil refineries. Furious, the U.S enacted the embargo.

Now one might be wondering, and this is a good question, why is the embargo still in place today? “The embargo is a relic of cold war era thinking” (procon.org). It’s been more than fifty years after it was established, The United States is no longer fighting the cold war; the Soviet Union has been disbanded. Should the U.S not lift the embargo and improve diplomatic relations with Cuba? The embargo is from and era come and gone and the reasons we established the embargo are no longer justifiable. Not to mention the embargo actually, “harms the U.S economy” (procon.org) by reducing potential exports.

Some Argue that the embargo should be maintained due to Cuba not meeting initial conditions required to lift the embargo. One condition being that Cuba must recognize basic human rights. While this is true, and by no means should Cuba not have to recognize human rights, however, there are better ways of gaining Cubans human rights than the embargo. Frankly the embargo is not working. Even, “Cuban Americans, think the embargo is not working” (procon.org). One solution, is lifting the embargo, and by allowing open travel to Cuba. A flood of American businessmen and tourist would expose Cuba and Cubans to American culture and idealism, hopefully, inspiring them to promote change for themselves.

Not only will lifting the embargo expose Cuba to American culture, but will also expose how Cuba has been neglecting its people and blaming its short comings on the Embargo. However, many argue that, “the Embargo enables the U.S to apply pressure on the Cuban government to improve human rights” (procon.org). The thing is, the embargo has been in effect for over fifty years, and there has been almost no change. Men and woman are still imprisoned for peacefully protesting. The Cuban government still controls all media, travel, housing, and employment. The Castro regime still refuses to improve conditions in Cuba and uses the Embargo and the United States as the excuse. So is the embargo the answer?

Well the fact of the matter is, maintaining the embargo is not the answer. For over fifty years the embargo has been in effect and it has cause little to no change in Cuba. Now is time to come up with new solutions because the Cuban people shouldn’t have to stand oppressed waiting for change. It is up to the U.S to make change happen, and it starts with the end of the embargo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

2015., Felicia Gustin March 27. "3 Big Benefits for Americans to Ending the Cuba Embargo." 3 Big Benefits for Americans to Ending the Cuba Embargo. N.p., 27 Mar. 2015. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

 

"Cuba Embargo - ProCon.org." Should United States maintain its embargo against Cuba? N.p., 19

Dec. 2016. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

 

"Cuba: Fidel Castro's Record of Repression." Human Rights Watch. N.p., 28 Nov. 2016. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

 

Hornberger, Jacob. "How the Cuban Embargo Got Imposed." The Future of Freedom Foundation. N.p., 13 Jan. 2015. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

 

Lincicome, Scott. "Yes, Of Course We Should Lift The Cuban Embargo." The Federalist. N.p., 30 Dec. 2014. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

 

Planas, Roque. "These Are The Major Human Rights Issues In Cuba And The Castro Government's

Response." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 22 Mar. 2016. Web. 27 Feb. 2017.

 

 


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