La Français, Glory of Roma

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Poetry  |  House: Booksie Classic
A poem set in the Napoleonic Era about the First French Empire

Submitted: June 01, 2017

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Content

Submitted: June 01, 2017

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La Français, Glory of Roma

 

The Crown of Majesty, Italia by his boot, taken as his trophy,  

Europa, her thrones abducted and destroyed,

Woe for the Glory of the Second French Empire.  

Heir to Caesar, and his might - left on an island called Elba.

Mother Russia defeated Bonaparte with cold snow,

Janus declared the end of the House of Bonaparte,

France never retained its former glory again to this day.

 

Nephew, nephew, why have you been tricked?  

Otto Von Bismarck, - Treachery!

Deceptive, Opportunistic,

Qualities of a mighty man.

If only he was a Frenchman.

 

The Imperial Eagle - Dead,

Napoleon’s Grand Armee - Destroyed,

Arch of Triumph - Violated,

Decima declared France’s demise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Official Review and Guide to La Français, Glory of Roma

 

 

 

Syllible Guide

 

The Crown of Majesty, Italia by his boot, taken as his trophy,  [ 18 ]

Europa, her thrones abducted and destroyed, [ 13 ]

Woe for the Glory of the Second French Empire.  [ 13 ]

Heir to Caesar, and his might - left on an island called Elba. [ 15 ]

Mother Russia defeated Bonaparte with cold snow, [ 13 ]

Janus declared the end of the House of Bonaparte, [ 13 ]

France never retained its former glory again to this day. [ 15 ]

 

Nephew, nephew, why have you been tricked?  [ 8 ]

Otto Von Bismarck, - Treachery! [ 8 ]

Deceptive, Opportunistic, [ 8 ]

Qualities of a mighty man. [ 8 ]

If only he was a Frenchman. [ 8 ]

 

The Imperial Eagle - Dead, [ 8 ]

Napoleon’s Grand Armee - Destroyed, [ 8 ]

Arch of Triumph - Violated, [ 8 ]

Decima declared France’s demise. [ 8 ]

 

 

Voice

 

Multiple voices are possible, due to the different ways this poem could be interpreted.

 

Sorrowful Tone - The poem lamenting the defeat of Napoleon and France. It can be reminiscent of the past victories of France, seen by the words  “crown, majesty, Italy, trophy, and glory”, all of which were symbols of power. The poet reminds his readers of France’s tragedy of losing the war, and the exile of Napoleon.

 

Satirical Joyful Tone - The poem praising and rejoicing the fact that Napoleon was defeated, and France never regained its former glory. It is seen by the emphasis on words such as “crown, majesty, Italy, trophy, and glory”, all of which is mocking France, due to all of it  stripped from them after their defeat.

 

Angered Admiration Tone - In the Second Stanza, it questions with anger why “Nephew was tricked” by Bismarck, but ends with “If only he was a Frenchman”, showing that Bismarck was admired by this “voice”, most likely referencing to Napoleon I, due to the “nephew” that was tricked by Bismarck was Napoleon III.

 

First Stanza Structure

 

The structuring of the poem itself references to the defeat of Napoleon through the content, and discreetly through the syllables used, there are 18 syllables in the first line, and 15 in the last line, a reference to the 1815 defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo. The surrounding 13 syllabled lines, pointing towards the middle emphasised stanza of antithetical construct, due to its contrasting idea of greatness of possessions, to a small island called Elba.

 

Each line of the poem is relatively short, with around 9-10 words for each line. It could be possibly employed as a short eulogy dedicated to either Napoleon I, France, or the both of them.

 

In the 4th line, it employs anacoluthon to give it a dramatic effect, the pause emphasising the sudden and contemporary shocking fact that Napoleon was exiled on Elba after his sudden defeat.

 

The structuring of the poem itself references to the defeat of Napoleon through the content, and discreetly through the line numbering, there are 18 syllables in the first line, and 15 in the last line, a reference to the 1815 defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo.

 

The usage of “Abducted” has a double meaning hinted at. It vaguely sounds similar to “abdication”, which references the Holy Roman Empire being dissolved after the abdication of Francis I. The literal word “Abducted” conveys the sense of being taken away, seen when nations were conquered, its sovereignty, and possessions taken away.

 

Another “double reference” is “Italia by His boot”. From a geographical perspective, the area of Italy is below the land of France, making it look like it was the “boot” of the large land of France, represented by Napoleon. It was also a reverse idiom, due to in a political perspective, Italy was under the control of Napoleon I and his Empire, with it reflecting the image of the “Boot of France” upon Italy in order to control it.

 

Imageries of greatness are alluded to, the crown of majesty represents the Iron Crown of Lombardy, an artifact used to crown royals in Medieval times, and “heir to Caesar”, due to his establishment of an Empire that was compared to that of the Roman Empire.


 

Second Stanza Structure

 

The voice is presumably Napoleon I, lamenting of France’s defeat in the Franco-Prussian war due to Bismarck’s trickery, hence his lament on why “Nephew” had been tricked. It  attempts to convey dramatically idea of Napoleon warning in vain of Bismarck’s “treachery”, emphasised by the use of anacoluthon before the word “treachery”, which in World History, France was defeated as a result of it.

 

Towards the ending, it uses a rhyme and identical endings of “man”, to emphasise the fictitious idea that if Bismarck was a Frenchman, the events of what had happened would have been greatly different. The part where it is commented that “If Only” reveals an admiration of Bismarck by the poet’s voice of Napoleon, or the poet himself.

 

Each of the lines in this stanza has 8 syllables, showing a link of some sort with the next stanza.


 

Third Stanza Structure

 

Each of the lines in this stanza has 8 syllables, showing a link of some sort with the previous stanza.

 

Anacoluthon is heavily used in this stanza in order to emphasise the defeat of France through pauses before words such as “Dead,Destroyed, and Violated”. It also employs contrast, the image of a symbol of French power, and the humiliation that each of them occurred.

 

This stanza uses repetition of the idea of a deity, this time “Decima”, the deity of fate,  commanding France’s defeat, with the idea repeating due to contemporary views of the House of Bonaparte, and France being synonymous.


 

Meaning

 

It would be lamenting the defeat of Napoleon, due to it portraying the end of Napoleon and his defeat, with the numbers that were constructed as a result of the structure, 18-15 a reference to his defeat. The poem, using the word “woe”, possibly references the admiration of Napoleon.

 

Oppositely, it could be lamenting the misery of France, that although Napoleon led it to victory in his wars, he also eventually brought about its ruin, with France never being able to gain the prestige of a “Napoleonic Empire”, through a Republic, or another Empire to the modern day. The reference to a Greek Deity, Janus, also possibly hints of Napoleon’s fault,  that even to the point the “gods” had to step in to remove him from power in an attempt to restore peace to France. This point could even be found in the title, where it mentions the "Glory of Rome", but is contradicted through the poem due to the various referances to the destruction of the French Empire.

 

 

A peculiar contrast is in the line “Europa, her thrones abducted and destroyed, Woe for the Glory of the Second French Empire. It tells of Europe being attacked by France, but the next lines laments the “woe”, or being sorry for the Glory of the French Empire. This could possibly be a historical reference to the defeat of France due Napoleon’s victorious wars, although he conquered most of Europe, it eventually led to France’s defeat, with the poem maintaining an “Anti-Napoleon” tone. On the other hand, it could also criticize that due to France never regained the reputation of a great empire, and the poem is lamenting this fact, with the author supporting Napoleon’s actions.


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