Hearts & Colours

Hearts & Colours

Status: Finished

Genre: Young Adult

Houses:

Details

Status: Finished

Genre: Young Adult

Houses:

Summary

Anna is just a normal girl, hoping to get through Grade Eleven relatively drama-free at her new school. She wants to make friends, go to prom, and when she has her eyes set on quirky, flowery girl, she wants love to be a part of the equation, too. She insists it will be hard to do anything, though: with her conjoined twin brother, Pavel, constantly by her side, she can't imagine ever being considered normal. But when something happens to make Anna doubt her entire life, she discovers something very special about what love is, as well as what it means to be normal.
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Summary

Anna is just a normal girl, hoping to get through Grade Eleven relatively drama-free at her new school. She wants to make friends, go to prom, and when she has her eyes set on quirky, flowery girl, she wants love to be a part of the equation, too. She insists it will be hard to do anything, though: with her conjoined twin brother, Pavel, constantly by her side, she can't imagine ever being considered normal. But when something happens to make Anna doubt her entire life, she discovers something very special about what love is, as well as what it means to be normal.

Chapter1 (v.1) - 1

Chapter Content - ver.1

Submitted: June 08, 2017

Reads: 115

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Chapter Content - ver.1

Submitted: June 08, 2017

A A A

A A A

Note: don't forget to read the prologue! You can access it in the chapters menu or down at the box on the bottom of the page :)

. . .

Wednesday, September 7th

There’s that alarm clock. That dreaded alarm clock, set on my phone for six-thirty. I set the volume to a measly couple bars, but it sure felt like royal trumpets stood next to us, announcing, “School! School! You’ve been sleeping in so long, this summer, but no more! It’s time for School!

I opened my eyes, looking up at the ceiling and watching the fan sway in place. Our room was still in darkness, with only the tiniest bit of early morning sun peeping in through the curtains. Even with our window open, it was near silent. Only the chirps of various songbirds, as well as a particularly hoarse crow, were loud enough to mean anything, but the gentle breathing next to me was also a lullaby to my ears.

I felt for my phone on the bedside table. “Ah, fuck.” I grabbed it and slid it open to stop its whining. Half-past six was the glowing time.

“At least I’m a morning person,” I mumbled. I checked the usual: Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter…not for notifications or anything. I don’t post very much, only the occasional pictures I have to share or even when I write something I’m proud of. People are usually pretty nice about my stuff, even if they don’t know where it comes from – not in the slightest. Yet still, I enjoy being the viewer, or the reader, somebody that can sit back and have fun from the sidelines.

I set my phone back down on the table. Then Pavel’s decided to pipe up and scream at him from his own side of the bed. Some David Bowie song.

He moaned and felt for his phone. “Shush, I’m already awake…”

“Good morning,” I said.

“Good morning,” he parroted. I turned on the lamp and we both groaned as it blinded us. Why was light so much lighter in the morning?

Wordlessly, we shot up into our morning routine. Deciding what to dress wasn’t really an issue: we didn’t have a very expansive closet of shirts, so we settled on a striped polo to wear underneath a black sweater. Plus, it was easy to decide on some pants: a nice new pair of jeans, wrapped in a blue and yellow belt. We looked as fresh as we could with a two-collared polo. I slipped on my yellow sock, and Pavel slipped on his own blue one. School was one step closer.

We cruised on down the stairs to the living room. The entire family was there, around the room as if they’d been sitting and watching the morning news for hours.

“They awaken!” Dad laughed, propped up on one of the sofas.

“Finally,” Mom teased. “We didn’t even expect you two to sleep last night, being all stressed about school.” She stood up from her seat on the couch and entered the kitchen area, holding a coffee cup. “I’m glad you got sleep, anyway. Good for the first day!” She smiled at us, making a beeline to the kitchen for her second cup. Marcela was at the dining table, writing on a paper. She mumbled a greeting, but didn’t look up from her work.

“There’s coffee left. Have some breakfast, you three. You guys especially,” she motioned with her cup to us. “You need energy. There’s toast, there’s some waffles in the freezer, there’s also oatmeal. Oh, and eggs and sausage, if you want that…”

Mom was not chill. Turning her attention away from her coffee fix, she was throwing all sorts of food on the counter as if we were at a buffet. Marcela laughed and set her pencil down.

Pavel laughed too as we walked into the kitchen.

“Mom, stop. I’ll just have toast,” he sighed. I nodded and assured her I would be fine with it too.

As we settled down with our food, Marcela walked over and sat down next to us, grinning from ear to ear. She was also heading off to her first day, but she was ecstatic. If you learned one thing about her, you’d know her to be quite the people person.

“So? How’re you feeling?” she asked us. Pavel gulped some bread down and shrugged.

“I dunno. I don’t think I’m worried all that much. But I still am.”

I looked up at the clock on the wall. School started at eight. It was seven. We’d be leaving soon.

“Anna’s nervous, though,” he told her. He looked at me briefly. “Butterflies.”

I smirked. “Yeah, I am.”

I looked down at the jam on my toast. It felt unappealing. I pushed it away from me and looked at Marcela.

“I can’t get over the feeling that nothing’s going to go right. I don’t want to be an outcast, not at all. Yet…” I stopped. There were more butterflies in our stomach, but not just from me. “I—I feel like it’s just going to happen.”

Marcela grimaced and leaned her elbows on the table. “People aren’t going to be that bad. They just need to get to know you. Know your individuality.”

We both nodded.

“And it’ll come,” she added. “I mean, whatever, right? Friends just happen. You’ll get used to the school.”

“Thanks,” Pavel said.

She reached her hand out for his and took it. Then another with mine.

“You’ve got me,” she ensured. “It’s new for me, too, so who knows if I can find anyone on the first day. But we’re going to the same place, so I’ll be around.”

I felt it all of a sudden. My tears began to fall. I tried to stifle them, but no muscle or thought in my body could prevent them.

“O—oh, god, not now,” I blubbered out. “Thank you. Marcie, I’m sorry…” Nothing coming out of my mouth made sense, but I couldn’t bother with words. The fact that we were going into foreign territory hit me like a truck. I knew no one. I had no doubt we were going to be pushed aside, judged at first glance like all we were was a misshapen body.

Marcela took my hand in both of hers. “Hey,” she began. “Finish up your breakfast. You’ll feel better with a full stomach.”

She gave us an enormous hug. She stood up and collected everything into her bag, slinging it onto her shoulder. Her hands waved gently for us to follow.

“We’ll do all right,” Pavel said, handing me a tissue and wearing the most worried of smiles. I nodded and padded the tears. Hopefully, my face would puff down from my meltdown in time for everyone’s first impression, not that it really mattered.

We got together our own bag of school goods. The usual, like binders and a lunch, and a little pencil case full of our writing knickknacks and lucky pens. There wasn’t time to brush our teeth, so Marcela handed us some peppermints to pop into our mouths. I had no idea if they did any freshening in the long run, but they were surely a nice sugar bomb, so I didn’t complain.

Dad was driving us. He took his keys and opened the door to a calm, grey sky. Typical of British Columbia.

“Ready? Got everything?” he questioned everyone. His eyes met mine and he smiled. “Anna, you’ve got your brother? He’s got to go to school, too.”

It was impossible not to giggle. He knew how to cheer me up. Pavel knew, too, because he grinned like a fool.

“Pretty sure. She better not lose me during the day, though,” he joked. “That would be ridiculous of her.”

I rolled my eyes. With my step, we walked out onto the front porch. Marcela, already racing to the car, waved at us as Dad paraded towards it.

“Let’s go, butterflies!” she shouted, calling us by our nickname. “No time to be late!”

We ran our clumsy body over to the car and hopped in, buckling up for the four-minute drive. As Dad cruised out of the driveway, I rested my head on Pavel’s and focused on the rocking of the car. Though my frightened tears were gone, I couldn’t look outside at the near-uniform landscape of trees, roads, houses, and all those metal school zone signs in the mess of suburbia. That only meant our destination crept closer and closer.

I wanted to say C.T. Brook Secondary School would be as warm and welcoming as the car we rode in, but I couldn’t shake the thought I was going to get eaten alive once we stepped into the hallways.


© Copyright 2017 Samantha Halliday. All rights reserved.

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