Why the Rose Bush Has Thorns

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
A small story I wrote for my language arts class in ninth grade. I had to create my own god and story.

Submitted: July 03, 2017

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Submitted: July 03, 2017

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Beyond the view of earthly mortals and high above glittery clouds, sat the great and glorious Mount Olympus – the home to a pantheon of gods and goddesses. All of these gods were ruled by Zeus and his lovely wife Hera.  Their abode was an immense mansion constructed of marble, gold, silver, and all manner of jewels. At times, Zeus and Hera would sit regally upon their golden thrones to receive visitors.  On one particular day in winter, they had a visit from a formidable visitor – the daughter of Demeteria and Zeus, Aigerim.  The typical quiet and peacefulness of the throne room was disturbed by her inconsolable and disturbed cries for help.

 

“I can’t live in the Subterranean Caves! There’s nothing beautiful to look at. I need to see plants from nature to be happy,” demanded Aigerim.

 

“Spring and summer you live among the mortals on the surface of earth. Is this not enough time to love nature and plants?  Does this not appease you?” inquired Hera.

 

“Forgive me, but the answer is NO!  The Subterranean Caves are damp, unyielding, and dank.  The smell of death lingers everywhere.  The beauty of nature is found nowhere in the Subterranean Caves.  If I must exist there without any of these beauties of nature, I’d rather die,” cried Aigerim.

 

Zeus was the father of Aigerim and he hated to see her without a desire to live.  Therefore, Zeus immediately requested that Natas ascend from the Subterranean Caves to Mount Olympus for a meeting to find a solution for the sorrowful Aigerim. Zeus was determined to find out what Natas could do to make Aigerim happy in the lifeless Subterranean Caves.

 

Luckily, Aphrodite, the goddess of love, overheard this whole conversation.  She pondered and contemplated how to make the Subterranean Caves a place where Aigerim could exist happily in such a dreary place.  Then, with a stroke of genius, Aphrodite had the answer! She suggested Natas bring all rose bushes, in their many varieties and colors, to the Subterranean Caves.  Their beauty, colors, and smell would please Aigerim.

 

Aigerim jumped for joy!  “Yes, I love this idea.  Thank you so much,” she said.

 

Zeus was delighted to see his daughter happy once again and ordered Natas to bring all the earthly rose bushes to the Subterranean Caves within the next month.

 

Across the face of the earth, rose bushes started disappearing. Pretty soon, there were hardly any rose bushes on earth left to be found.  Athena, the goddess of wisdom, quickly noticed that all the rose bushes were disappearing and became deeply concerned.  She investigated and found out from Hera how Zeus had agreed to transplant all the rose bushes to the Subterranean Caves to bring happiness to Aigerim.

 

Using her great wisdom, Athena, devises a plan to preserve the rose bushes that are still on earth and, at the same time, allow for Aigerim to have some rose bushes in the Subterranean Caves, as well. The plan was to allow Natas and Aigerim to keep all the rose bushes that they had already removed to the Subterranean Caves. However, to keep a balance in nature, Athena curses all remaining rose bushes on earth with thorns.  The thorns are toxic to Natas.  If he pricks his finger on a rose bush thorn and bleeds, he will lose all this godly powers and be blind as well.

 

Natas desires to keep his godly powers and avoid blindness, so he immediately stops bringing rose bushes to the Subterranean Caves.  Aigerim is completely happy with the rose bushes she already has received and life is restored to happiness and order, both above and below.

 

Thus, from that day on, rose bushes have always had thorns, except in the Subterranean Caves.

 


© Copyright 2017 Meghan Aigerim Cella. All rights reserved.

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