Men and Missiles or the Common Life in the State of Permanent Combat Readiness

Reads: 196  | Likes: 2  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

More Details
Status: In Progress  |  Genre: War and Military  |  House: Booksie Classic


The events that are described in this story happened in beautiful seventies, the years of my youth. Later this time was announced as a stagnation period, which had been transferred in middle
eighties into perestroika and finished with the collapse of the Soviet Union in December 1991. How did we live that epoch? Who were those soviet soldiers and officers who aimed nuclear missiles to
US’s military bases and peaceful cities? How did they look these inhabitants of the Empire of the Evil? What were they thinking about being on the combat duties? How did they spend their leisure
time? Did they believe in communist dogmas? Did living under the iron curtain and permanent exposure to alternative reality of communist ideology deafen and deaden them? Let’s take a glance at that
time through the perception prism of one particular actor, me, a former citizen of that disappeared country and a participant of the events presented below. Maybe you will find at least a hint to
the answers for these questions.

Table of Contents

1. Beer in Honor of Return from Military Camp

Submitted: August 17, 2017

In this chapter you will know a little bit about common life of the Soviet university students, their military training, ways of having fun, drinking habits, even “culture” of moderate drinking, and, maybe, get a first hint to the answer on the question why the democracy in Russia is still problematic and what is a role of beer in this problem. Read Chapter

2. Last Session and Summer Vacation

Submitted: August 22, 2017

This chapter will introduce you to the idea of what does it mean to be a Volga native, how summer life cocktail is mixed, tell a little about communist ideology guinea pigs, surprise with info about exams cribbing (is this a reason do not trust Russians?), and show surrealistic picture of red letters in night sky seen from a wilderness. Read Chapter

3. Graduation

Submitted: August 30, 2017


In this chapter you will know how much fun you can have during aircraft pre-graduation diploma practice, graduate research and thesis writing; why daiquiri wasn’t available in Kuibyshev sometime,
and where crayfish are sleeping in a winter season.
Read Chapter

4. Road to the Unit

Submitted: September 09, 2017


In this chapter you will know some unusual details of public transportation in the USSR and, hopefully, get the idea of why many Russians still believe that Ukrainians are Russians except their
Western tribes, who belong, on Russian opinion again, to Galician. One question of the chapter, “What happened with the Young Communist letter addressed to the future generation?” is not answered
yet.
Read Chapter

5. Admission to the Combat Duties

Submitted: September 19, 2017


In this chapter you will know of how many things officer uniform consisted, what thoughts were induced by the map on the wall in the colonel’s office, why representative of the USA’s interests
instructed Soviet rocketeers, what were dreams of the KGB Captain, how intercity telephone of the Soviet era and corruption in modern Russia are related, and could you have fun during preparation
for the combat duty readiness exam.
Read Chapter

6. Workday routines and holidays fun

Submitted: October 20, 2017


In this chapter you will get some ideas of what does it mean to be on duty in permanent combat readiness, what thoughts could visit your head while looking at nuclear warhead from the hill of
control room bunker, how Soviet statutory holidays looked like, what did we drink and eat at the party in an honor of the war simulation end, and many more, such as dreams about own car or how
communist propaganda was rubbed in, and even how Caribbean Crisis changed demography in town of Lebedin.
Read Chapter

7. Visit to Poltava

Submitted: November 15, 2017


In this chapter you will know a little bit more about relations between Russians and Ukrainians and, maybe, get a hint of why these relations are more complicated today; interesting facts of the
Soviet school educative process of Gulag’s technique will be revealed; and the scene of playing soccer with elephant in Crimea just is here too.
Read Chapter


More War and Military Books