Super Violoncello

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Fan Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
The cello or violoncello is the bass member of the violin family of musical instruments, which also includes the violin, viola and the double bass. The cello is used as a solo musical instrument, as well as in chamber music ensembles, and even some types of rock bands. Sophie was a cellist. That’s how you call someone who plays the violoncello.

Submitted: August 21, 2017

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Submitted: August 21, 2017

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The cello or violoncello is the bass member of the violin family of musical instruments, which also includes the violin, viola and the double bass. The cello is used as a solo musical instrument, as well as in chamber music ensembles, and even some types of rock bands. It is the second-largest and second lowest (in pitch) bowed string instrument in the modern symphony orchestra.

Sophie was a cellist. That's how you call someone who plays the violoncello. She was "The Student" who played "The Blue Note" "Beyond the Clouds". She was a dreamer with her head in the clouds. She played the cello with the grace of a "Marquise" (Marquessa). She was "Lost & Found" by the "Police" during "A Midsummer Night's Dream" when she was just a baby. When she turned three, she was adopted by a Russian lady named "Anna Karenina" who already had two children, "Alex & Emma". When she was a teenager she went to "The Party" where she met "Fanfan", a girl who studied cello at the conservatory. This day she realized that:

"Happiness Never Comes Alone"

It comes with music. From this day on she was obsessed with cello. It was "Mad Love". She didn't care about the boys, she just cared about her new passion for music.

She just said to herself when she walked in the street:

"Don't Look Back"

Whenever men whistled and catcalled her. Street harassment was an everyday reality for Sophie. Day in and day out millions of women are whistled at or shouted at on public streets. Anti-Street Harassment Organizations are trying to make the streets safer and more pleasant for women. Much has been done, in the West at least, to deal with harassment in the workplace, but the streets remain a different proposition. But why does it happen?! Some specialists have their answers to the question.

"Culturally, men have been indoctrinated into it, and it's been a privilege for them to walk down the street fantasising about women. The culture hasn't checked the behaviour."

"Because society has perpetuated this as a cultural norm, men tend to engage in street harassment as a way to prove their masculinity."

"Often times it's not really about the women, it's just about the men performing masculine acts for each other and establishing a pecking order amongst themselves. What is really going on is the dynamic among men."

They also have the solution to the problem:

"We have to engage men. In our society it is easy to sexually objectify women, so it is important to make men realise that every woman you harass is someone's mother, sister or daughter, and she is a person who deserves respect."

"When men take accountability for the actions of themselves and their peers, it helps to create a cultural shift in attitude. If a man feels that catcalling won't be accepted by his peers, he is less likely to engage in the behaviour."

"When men are made aware of it, hopefully by women they love, they can listen, hear and see what is going on. It becomes an individual responsibility and men really do care when they get it. I have seen enormous change happen in the consciousness of men."

I have my own opinion about this problem. When I was at school, sometimes, I had to face bullying. To me it's nothing more than men bullying women, just like in the school playground. It also happens between locals and immigrants, bosses and employees, rich-powerful people (or states) and poor-vulnerable people (or states). The law of the strongest is in our genes. And it shows in these kinds of behavior...

Back to Sophie and her cello. She graduated with honors from the conservatory and moved to England where she performed with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. As she was French, she had an advantage above her English counterparts.

"So, sometimes, when I'm not happy with my performance and I have to think, I will think in English."

Only when she's not happy with her performance. Otherwise, she thinks in French, of course.

"Oh, I'm not English, I cannot talk on behalf of an English person. I'm French. I can say about French. They are quite emotional, though, and they talk about their emotions."

That supposes an English person is not emotional, and don't talk about their emotions? Sometimes, many things are said without being said. Sophie obviously implied that English are not equal to French in a somehow negative way.

"And that's how the world, I think, imagines French women you know like very womanly and seducing men and that's how they like to imagine them."

Don't ask her what people imagine about English women. You might get the same kind of answers she gave about an English person. Some people feel culturally superior. I think some French like Sophie do. This is ridiculous! (an American would say: this is bullshit!)

"I think it's almost easier to make people cry than to make people laugh."

When you play cello, it's obvious you won't make people laugh.

"So, goodnight Sophie. If "The World Is Not Enough" get "Quantum Love."


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