Lily's Dance

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Literary Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: November 20, 2017

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Submitted: November 20, 2017

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Lily’s Dance

 

Lily walked on the isle of her school bus thinking of an alibi why she can’t dance for the family day next week. Why was I chosen? Please, God. I’m too shy. Please tell mom and dad it’s okay if I don’t dance. Pleeaaaasse. When she arrived home, she immediately told her parents that she was chosen as one of the performers for the upcoming family day.

 

“Can I just do something else? I don’t want to dance.”

 

“Well, then, you just have to learn to. Extracurricular activities will help your grades. They monitor that too, you know,” her dad answered. “What’s so difficult with dancing?”

 

The difficult thing is, she doesn’t know how to. She hasn’t had any experience in dancing and for a 5-year-old, tripping on stage can be mortifying. She knew that has a high chance of happening due to her clumsiness.

 

“You’re always like that. You’re being nonsense. That’s just a dance. What will your teachers and other parents say? They’ll be disappointed. They chose you too. You don’t want to hurt their feelings just because of a dance, would you?” her mom added.

 

The next day, she was brought to the school by her mom for the practice. She arrived a bit late and was very shy to join. All the kids are flailing their arms and doing complicated skips and steps. They’re almost halfway through the dance. I won’t be able to catch up. The dance teacher is one of her mom’s friends, Aunt Laura. She’s kind to her and in her eyes, she looks like a cool mom; although sometimes, she hears other moms talking about her. Oh, she worked in Japan as a waitress? So, she probably did some side jobs too? Some parents are commenting on her makeup, tight dress, and short skirts sometimes. Lily once asked her mom why some people are mad at her. ‘Don’t listen to adult conversations,’ her mom said.

 

Laura spotted her and her mom walking towards the stage. She and her mom struck some small talk and Aunt Laura urged her to join the practice. When she said she’s shy to join, Aunt Laura dragged her to the stage to at least watch the steps. She obliged.

 

They ate tuna sandwiches and orange juice during the 1-hour breaktime. Her mom, in her clenched jaw told her to dance during the second part of the practice, or else, she’ll tell on her to her dad. Aunt Jane heard their conversation and said, “Maybe she doesn’t like the instructor,” and giggled.

 

Five minutes before the second half of the practice, Aunt Laura went to talk to Lily and asked her to participate after the break. Two other moms are joining in on pushing her to dance on stage. I’m scared. I can’t do the dance. She didn’t know what to tell them. “Why won’t you dance, Lily?” “The steps are easy.” “You can do it.” She looked at Aunt Jane who was contented eating her sandwich.

 

“I don’t like Aunt Laura to teach me.”

 

 Her mom glared at her and immediately, she regretted opening her mouth. Aunt Laura looked quite shocked with what she said but she dragged her nevertheless towards the stage and forced her to dance. She grudgingly followed every step with her heart pounding. She didn’t care about the dance and the people watching anymore. She didn’t even care if she trips or messes up. She only cared about going home and what awaits her there.

 

After the practice, she prayed to God that she wouldn’t get hit later. She said sorry for telling what she said to Aunt Laura. On the way to the car, her mom didn’t say another word. She held her hand but her nails were digging into her skin. At the backseat, she tried to hold back her tears as she rubbed her arm. The nail marks on her arm hurt a lot and her heart seems stuck in her throat. She held back her tears because it’s forbidden when ‘it’s her fault.’ ‘If that tear drops, I’ll add another blow to your punishment,’ her dad once said. So, she sat there praying and saying sorry to God for being a bad person that day.

 

When they arrived home, her mom immediately said what happened at school.  Her dad got his brown leather belt.

 

“GET DOWN TO THE FLOOR! ON YOUR STOMACH!” His voice thundered inside the house.

 

When it was over, she slept for three hours straight. She woke up a little bit when her mom checked the welts on her buttocks. She prayed again that night.

 

“God, I’m sorry for being a bad person today. I’m sorry I said that to Aunt Laura. I promise I won’t hurt other’s feelings anymore because of simple things like a dance. I’ll dance well at practice tomorrow.”

 


© Copyright 2018 Maia Stone. All rights reserved.

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