THE TEAPOT,VOYAGE TO THE CENTRE OF THE GALAXY PART ONE

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In search of yesterday, tomorrow and the truth of......

Submitted: January 17, 2018

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Submitted: January 17, 2018

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THE TEAPOT

VOYAGE TO THE CENTRE OF THE GALAXY

BY

DONALD HARRY ROBERTS

 

PART ONE

THE DREAMER AND HIS DREAM

1

My mentor who was overseeing my scholastic endeavours to achieve my doctorate in quantum physics and mechanics was reluctant to allow me to publish this account, due mainly to the unbelievable nature of it. Nonetheless, here it is from that first morning when Professor Artemus Cochrane invited me to breakfast and described the most outlandish dream I have ever heard.

"My boy. You can have no idea how explicitly real this dream was. It was in fact so detailed I have all the knowledge I require to make it come true, with your help of course."

"Prey tell" I urged enthusiastically.

2

Communication is the hope of ever reaching ET life since we have not yet discovered a workable means of physical travel. That is what makes this dream so exciting. I have been contacted from afar and have been given instructions on how to build a vessel for space travel that will be able to cross vast regions of space in reasonable stretches of time. Though a crude version the current method of space drive, the Em drive we have developed a basic idea of the method. Of course we have made no advance in the science of inertial dampers or shielding from the effects of the sun on an unprotected body.

3

I understood, in part, what my mentor was talking about. We had been working on faster than light theories since I began my studies in quest for my BA in quantum physics and mechanics. It was the extra-sensory communications that zoomed over my head like a jet plane. Even with my degree of enlightenment such things were still a little in the fantasy stage. I say this because I have never had any such experiences, but more importantly I had never met anyone who had, until that moment. "Please go one professor." My words came out sounding tolerant.

4

It wasn't voices I heard. It was visions of a three dimensional nature in which I was a part, an integral part I think. I saw worlds teaming with life and species far beyond us in technology and enlightenment and others beyond us technically but even more violent. Worlds that orbit the centre of our galaxy. I saw places that our best telescopes have not even detected. But what is most curious is, though there are other species in the galaxy much like us, we are isolated from the galactic community. We are in that stage of development between infancy and adult hood.

5

I listened intently, as interested in his essay as if I believed every word was true, not just a dream, but then who was I to say it was not real. There are after all cultures in the human world that believe the world of dreams is just as real as the waking world.

Professor Cochrane barely paused for a breath and a sip of wine before he continued with his verbal essay only now he ventured into a technological aspect of the dream. It was so clearly described that I was bound to believe the machine in question could actually be real.

6

I will not here describe the space craft for it would take several pages to do so, but for hours I listened to the professor's detailed description. In short it was a craft that could achieve speeds far greater than light by using an em drive engine base augmented by an energy quantum accelerator. The ship included inertia dampers and a terra-arboretum for growing food and oxygen manufacturing. Though the ship was completely automated it could be driven manually if and when necessary. In short the vessel was designed for long space voyages that mankind still considers theoretical and science fiction.

7

Said I, when the description was completed. "Even if your dream is real, we do not have blueprints and the cost to build such a machine would be catastrophical."

Professor Cochrane smiled slyly then reached behind hid chair and produce a tube from which he extracted the necessary schematics for the ship and quickly rolled them open on the floor.

Said he, maintaining his sly smile. I did not say my dream occurred in a single night my boy. It has come to me over many years. In fact I was your age when it began."

I gawked at my mentor utterly dumbfounded.

8

My first comment after examining the drawings was a statement of the obvious. "This machine is much too large to launch from earth." My mentor acknowledged the observation with a nod and widened his smile which by now told me he had already determined that and likely had resolved the problem, but said nothing for the moment.

"And of course, as I suggested before, the cost would prove prohibitively catastrophic."

His smile widened even more.

"I have been with you for seven years Professor. Why have you never mentioned this before? I could have been of some help I am sure." Said I moodily.

9

The answer I received was the most diplomatic way of admonishing someone that I have ever heard. "My boy. You are brilliant. I have never met another whose mind was so expanded. However it has only been recently that you have grown enough to understand what I have shared with you and what I am about to share with you. Before now I was uncertain you could keep this to yourself given your liking for martinis and brandy alexanders. Liquor makes loose lips. But I have noticed you have been abstaining this past year and have settled into your studies like a professional."

10

I flushed but offered no response to indicate why I stopped drinking and I shall not reveal that knowledge now as it is much, much too embarrassing. I sad only, "I enjoy a glass of wine at dinner and an evening draft of bitters."

"Ah. Very much like myself." The professor replied and the subject was dropped.

"Now that I have revealed my dream Mr. Montague I shall introduce you to the practical application, but that must wait for a few days.

"Montague. He always calls me Montague even though he knows it is not my real name, but for the purpose of this tale I shall leave it at that.

I left the professors company and went to visit Sheanna, his daughter who had long ago stolen my heart, and I hers. Little did I know how intertwined our lives would become.

TO BE CONTINUED


© Copyright 2018 Donald Harry Roberts. All rights reserved.

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