Was Edward Sallow Right?

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: War and Military  |  House: Booksie Classic


The enigmatic ruler of the 86 Tribes and the Legion. Edward Sallow AKA Caesar, pronounced (Kai-Sar) claims that his legion, which enslaves, and claims whole tribes and identities into its seething
mass, is the best hope for the future of humanity, he also believes that it is not only beneficial to humanity, but necessary. Is he right?


To the question of why the Legion is so... strange, Edward Sallow, Caesar had this to say: "I used Imperial Rome as the model for my Legion precisely because it was so foreign, so alien. I'd seen what had become of the NCR's attempts to emulate the culture of Pre-War America - the infighting, the corruption. Rome was a highly militarized autocracy that effectively integrated the foreign cultures it conquered. It dedicated its citizens to something higher than themselves - to the idea of Rome itself. In Rome I found a template for a society equal to the challenges of the post-apocalyptic world - a society that could and would survive... A nationalist, imperialist, totalitarian, homogenous culture that obliterates the identity of every group it conquers... The individual has no value beyond his utility to the state, whether as an instrument of war, or production." Caesar is a smart man, there is little dispute over his intelligence, which saves his life several times. With that intelligence, however, why would a forward thinking man seek to go backwards? I think that he isn't going backwards. Many claim that his attempt to emulate Rome is his downfall, as his conquest of 86 tribes is far to fast and does not effectively integrate his citizens. Yet, I think that he understands that he won't live long enough to see a true Rome of the wasteland. Rome was never a nomadic nation like Caesar's legion. If he wanted a Rome, he could have chosen any city. Flagstaff, his first capital, Phoenix, the Pre-War capital of Arizona, Denver, the list goes on. I hope to shed some light on Caesar's mentality, as I see it. Of course, his thoughts and words are well documented, but, I think he hides more than he lets on.

Caesar chose imperial Rome, not in national style, nor in military structure. He uses the formation of recruits in the front, veterans in the rear, but that's it. There's not a scutum, or Roman shield, in sight. His machetes are made of lawnmower blades, and armor made of sports gear, barely reinforced to protect the wearer. Is Caesar stupid? How could he make such mistakes if he has supposedly studied imperial Rome? Arcade, a companion, says that Caesar's men are trained to worship him as a living deity. That's not very Roman, Romans worshipped the Roman gods, and their leaders were either elected, or hereditary dictators. Even his name is a red herring. He forces his soldiers to speak in a well educated and fancy way. Using large words, and forced to call their enemies things like dissolute, profligates, and why? To hide the truth of their culture. It is not Roman, Caesar is less a Roman emperor, and more like what he attributes to his namesake. He is less of a Caesar as he is a Hannibal. A conqueror that traveled into Rome and sacked her cities. Caesar became an emperor, and Hannibal did not. Then again, his nomadic tribes and cobbled together arsenal and armaments resemble more the Mongolians under Genghis Khan. Why then did he not claim the name of the Khan? Because there is another, who claims it, Papa Khan of Red Rock Canyon. Yet, he is less of a Khan than Caesar is a Roman. This clear misdirection is why Caesar is so effective in warfare. His first foray into combat was actually when he was held captive by the Blackfoot tribe. This must have seemed to him like a sign, Julius Caesar had also been captured and held for ransom. Instead of antagonizing his captors and demanding they raise his ransom price, Edward, as he was at the time, took it upon himself to teach the tribe how to do war. How to use firearms, how to make explosives, and how to fight in total war. He says, "The tribes played at war, raiding each other, a little rape and pillage here, a little ransoming there." He took control of the Blackfoot warriors, using Joshua Graham, a translator, to be his lips. He led the warriors against the Blackfoot's weakest enemies, the Ridgers, surrounded the camp, and ordered them to surrender, when they didn't, he had them killed, men, women, and children. To quote Anakin Skywalker, "Not just the men, but the women, and the children too." He then led the warriors on to the Kiababs, who then likewise refused, so he showed an envoy the Ridgers' camp, introducing them to the horrors of real war. Time passed, Edward became Caesar, Joshua became Legatus, and the whole thing became an empire. The question remains, was this the Roman thing to do? Julius Caesar didn't conquer tribes then Rome herself, Julius Caesar took Roman soldiers, conquered distant lands, then returned to an adoring public which attempted to crown him king. How then, is Caesar claiming to be a Roman emperor? The truth is that he knows he isn't.

His conquest of tribes and history of destroying cities as a sign is the mark of a different leader. Caesar is a Khanic figure. Like Genghis Khan, he united many tribes and let them loose upon an unsuspecting world. His men don't form ranks and march into battle like drilled and trained Legionnaires, and why should they? Machine gun fire and grenades would chew through an advancing force. Instead, Caesar uses his men like Greek Peltasts, or Zulu warriors. They are light infantry, striking without warning and fading away. When the Legion presses a forward assault, it is done with a seething mass of bodies, and an unwavering goal: Press on, even into death, the alternative is too horrible to speak. His men put themselves through meat grinders in every fight, and yet, somehow, using spears and swords, they push back NCR troops, armed with automatic weapons. How, when out armed and supposedly outmatched, do they carry the day? Their strength lies with their training. Legionnaires are trained in units, much like NCR troopers, yet, different. The Legion's training regimen for standard infantry is on par, or maybe harder than NCR special forces, or Rangers. This high stress and need for unity brings the Legion closer as units and family. The punishment for disobeying orders in the Legion is steep. First, the commanding officer is beaten to death, and then the men are lined up, and every tenth man is pulled out, and the remaining nine must beat them to death. If the soldiers are insubordinate, and refuse to participate, even only one man, then the process will be repeated until the lesson is learned. Decimatio, as it is called, insures that the men are more afraid of the penalty of failure over the cost of success. A meat grinder is nothing if it can save men you have come to be very close to. It is not stated explicitly if Caesar supports homosexuality between his soldiers, but it aided his harsh penalties.

He quotes Hegelian Dialectics as his right to conquest. Hegel states that human progress is marked like a pendulum, thesis begins the swinging, antithesis is the overcorrection. A pendulum never comes to rest in one swing, it over corrects to both sides until the over corrections begin bringing the swinging slower, and eventually to a single point, that point is the synthesis, when thesis and antithesis are rectified and parts that are from both the thesis and antithesis are brought to bear in the end result. He claims that his Legion is the antithesis of the NCR, if this is true, then that means, not what he says, that it's "Inevitable that it be destroyed." It means that the NCR and Legion are destined to become one nation, bound together by shared values and cultural markers. Unfortunately, I think that Caesar knows that this is the fate of the Legion. Many have noted that the Legion is held together only by their dictatorial deity. Lanius, Caesar's general, cannot control the Legion, his disdain for them and hate for his own men will only lead to the destruction of everything Caesar is building. Caesar is not claiming the Hoover Dam because he is trying to unify another 85 tribes into his Legion, he's not claiming Vegas to give his Legion a Rome, as he says. He's attempting to force the NCR into synthesis. If he can take the Dam, and Vegas, the NCR will need to bring a force to bear, and that force will bring Legion ideas to the NCR. It's like the Crusades, when the crusaders returned from the Middle East, they brought ideas such as cleanliness, the necessity of study, and of course mercantilism like Europe had not seen. So too will the NCR troopers bring ideas like the disdain of the infighting and corruption of their government, the seeds of rebellion, and the blueprints, taken from "Old Books" to create a nation that could and would not only survive, but thrive in the wasteland. Caesar is right, his Legion is the best hope for humanity, because after several generations of interbreeding, and exchanging of ideas, the next generation of Legion leaders, and NCR leaders, should be able to come to the negotiating table, and if Caesar's work has been done right. They will cease to be two, warring and competitive nations, and become one nation, cleansed of the politics that cursed the NCR and the imperial fascism of the Legion.


Submitted: February 14, 2018

© Copyright 2021 Foxx Mann. All rights reserved.

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Ech

Degenerates like you belong on a cross

Thu, February 15th, 2018 4:45pm

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In Hoc Signo Taurus Vinces. Vale.

Thu, February 15th, 2018 9:43pm

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