Resources For Writers

Reads: 94  | Likes: 3  | Shelves: 4  | Comments: 4

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


I am not claiming to be an expert on writing or grammar. I wrote this to vent a little about Booksie and to tell my fellow writers of useful resources available.

Submitted: April 28, 2018

A A A | A A A

Submitted: April 28, 2018

A A A

A A A


Booksie is a valuable resource for a writer. I personally enjoy sharing my short stories and seeing other writer’s styles. While there are a lot of good things about Booksie there are also some down sides. One side is the poor quality of the editor and formatting of our published works. As well as a complete lack of a collaboration platform. While it is out of my control to fix these issues, I have found other resources online that my fellow Booksie members should use. The first resource is a free online editor that has greatly improved my writing. Before I found this resource, I was using Microsoft word and peer reviews for my writing. While there are a lot of very good writers on Booksie I soon realized that hasty peer reviews inspired only by the prospect of getting their own work reviewed does not produce quality reviews. Some treat their reviews like they are the golden ticket and even offer them up as prizes to contest. If we could collectively agree to put our pride aside, take and give all the in-line reviews and general reviews we can without feeling defensive or looking for something in return Booksie would be a much more powerful resource. If you are still reading this my little rant is over and I will now talk about the resources I have been using.

 

The editor is the Hemingwayapp.com. It is an online editor that shows you how many adverbs, passive voice and hard to read sentences you have in your writing. It also tells you what grade level your writing is at. This website has opened my eyes to sentences that sounded good in my head but would not make sense to others. As well as helping me improve my style of writing.

 

The next two resources I recommend are books. The first book is "Plot Versus Character: A Balanced Approach to Writing Great Fiction" by Jeff Gerke. This book outlines how to identify whether you are a plot driven writer, like myself, or a character driven writer. As well as how to combine the two types improving the quality of your writing. Now, if you’re like me you made it through English class in high school and may have a creative writing class at collage, all the same, the subtle complexities of English grammar may still allude you. That is where the book The Elements of Style by William Strunk Jr. And E.B. White comes in. It explains simple things like when to use a comma or if a semicolon would be better. Explains active and passive voice and there is even a work book that goes with it.

 

In conclusion, I believe it is important for writers, above all, to write. Put in the time, sit at your desk, dedicate a given amount of time every day to writing. Some days you will stare at your computer screen and nothing will happen. Other days your hands won’t be able to keep pace with your mind. After that it is important to read, but not just novels I agree it is important to see the writing styles of successful authors but it is equally important to read about writing. I will leave you with a quote "Time and tide wait for no man. The life so short, the crafts so long to learn. The greatest scholars are not usually the wisest people." -Geoffrey Chaucer


© Copyright 2018 JackCrawford. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments:

Comments

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply