Drama Scholarship Essay 2018

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


Threw my hat in the ring, let's see what I get. Just wanted to post for the record. Also, kind of acts as some context for DTTL posts in the future. Just piecing life back together, one post at a
time.

Submitted: April 28, 2018

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Submitted: April 28, 2018

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Prompt: Describe why your participation in the Theatre Arts program at Capuchino High School has been important to you.

 

I have been with the theatre program since my Freshman year. I had done theatre in a capacity before, at my middle school, but never in productions as large or consuming as that at Capuchino. Coming to a new school, I felt the need to justify my position with the only thing the school offered that I felt comfortable with. Therefore, I went with theatre.

 

In my Freshman year, I was a part of the Musical Theatre class, where I was first introduced to a curriculum dedicated to the arts. That was new, and so was the positive feedback I received from members of the class. Additionally, after I found out about the Fall play that year, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, I auditioned, recognizing that just being a part of the production would be a big step towards my goal of feeling involved. I got a major role, and between this and the M.T class, I got my exposure that I needed that would set me up for the majority of my high school career.

 

In 2015, I did three productions, with two of them being as part of the school. It was, and has been, my closest involvement with theatre so far. In addition to being casted as Roger in Grease, I also worked on set design and construction in a smaller capacity, which gave me opportunity that I wouldn’t have expected from the theatre department. As a student, being entrusted with the responsibility of putting together a set that myself and others would perform on was redeeming, and made me feel as if I could be trusted (myself still being a relatively new member of the community). In May, I would be inducted into Troupe 3933 of the International Thespian Society, an organization that recognized a dedication to the theatre arts.  Later in the year I would be part of the cast of Alice in Wonderland in minor roles.

 

Following a semester-long hiatus from theatre where I still felt included in the goings-on within the theatre community, I returned in my Junior year of Fall 2016 to play the role of Piggy Banks in Drop Dead. It was during this time that I began to learn more than just jokes from my fellow actors. I studied their habits, and from their styles did I develop my characters beyond what I could’ve learned from shows or books. Aside from this, I gained positive interactions and long-term friendships that would last well past theatre. It was for these reasons I would return in the Spring of 2017 to be part of my first musical since Freshman year, with myself as Chef Louis in Disney’s The Little Mermaid.

 

My Senior year in theatre was the year I learned the most lessons, and therefore is the part I’d deem most important, among the other years. I played as a father twice, once as Captain Keller in The Miracle Worker, and once as Kevin Rosario in In the Heights. The characters themselves had responsibilities, and learned lessons along the way themselves. One thing that always came back to them was that they didn’t have to face their problems alone. This is similar to being an individual, like myself, in such a strong and supportive community like theatre. One person does not make a show, and one person cannot handle all of their concerns without going back to the people of a community they feel appreciated and respected in, or a place which they treat as an outlet. That is what theatre has done for me most this year, and has proven true throughout my high school career. For that, I am all the better because of it.

 


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