Where are my Records?

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Humor  |  House: Archibald Brownstone


A thing that happen to me while serving in the Army Finance Company. How carma will come back to bite you.

Submitted: June 04, 2018

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Submitted: June 04, 2018

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During my time in the Army, I was a Finance Specialist stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington. I worked thru out the finance department in different sections. But the one section that I enjoyed the most was the customer service counter. It was here that the service member could come and ask question about his or her pay. For example “Why was my check smaller then it was last month?” “Did they pay me for the promotion I got? Things like that. Or offices and enlisted  could set-up an appointment to start their out processing. (They had completed the enlistment and did not wish to reenlist).

heir turn when this Second Lieutenant (or Butter Bar to us in the service.) came up and cut in right in front of the members that were waiting.

counter top with his fingers. The longer he had to stand there the faster the fingers went. I had finished my call and still set there with my finger on the buttons on the phone where the hand set rested acting as if I was still on the phone. (We had dividers between our desk and the counter with the fiberglass ridge panels along the top so the Lieutenant could not see what I was doing.) After about 3 minutes of making him wait I got up and walked to the counter. “Yes Sir, what can I do for you?” “I want to make my ETS appointment.” “OK Sir no problem” I replied as I reached for the appointment sheet.  I took his name and last four of his social security number and wrote them down and handed him an appointment reminder slip. The lieutenant turned and went out the door. I turn to one of my buddies and said “would it be funny if his records got lost.” The next service member standing at the counter laughed and said “yes it would”. We all got a good laugh out of it and then forgot all about it.

A month later when his appointment came up we sent down to records to have his sent up. My buddy in records came over to me a said that the record could not be found. There is a check out card that normally is place where the record belongs (the records are filed alphabetically in long bends.) and none could be found. So there was no way of knowing who took the record or when.

The next day when it came time for his appointment the lieutenant was told that due to the fact that his record was MIA (missing in action) he would have to extend his enrollment while we send to the Finance Center in Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana for a copy of his records. (This normally takes 30 to 60 days.) Needless to say shock his head negative and held up his hands. I did the same to him.

of  the service members. And one of the older ladies had gone on 30 day leave. And when she did she just wiped everything on top of her desk into a drawer of her desk and locked the drawer and went on vacation. 15 days into the recovery of the records she comes back opens the drawer and started getting the stuff  back out. When all of a sudden she holds up a record and ask “Is this the record you all been looking for?”  My buddy and I along with some friends where laughing so hard that tears came to our eye, the lieutenant was called the next day and on the following day my time in the Army, I was a Finance Specialist stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington. I worked thru out the finance department in different sections. But the one section that I enjoyed the most was the customer service counter. It was here that the service member could come and ask questions about his or her pay. For example “Why was my check smaller then it was last month?” “Did they pay me for the promotion I got? Things like that. Or offices and enlisted could set-up an appointment to start their out processing. (They had completed the enlistment and did not wish to reenlist).

heir turn when this Second Lieutenant (or Butter Bar to us in the service.) came up and cut in right in front of the members that were waiting.

countertop with his fingers. The longer he had to stand there the faster the fingers went. I had finished my call and still set there with my finger on the buttons on the phone where the handset rested acting as if I was still on the phone. (We had dividers between our desk and the counter with the fiberglass ridge panels along the top so the Lieutenant could not see what I was doing.) After about 3 minutes of making him wait I got up and walked to the counter. “Yes Sir, what can I do for you?” “I want to make my ETS appointment.” “OK Sir no problem” I replied as I reached for the appointment sheet.  I took his name and last four of his social security number and wrote them down and handed him an appointment reminder slip. The lieutenant turned and went out the door. I turn to one of my buddies and said “would it be funny if his records got lost.” The next service member standing at the counter laughed and said “yes it would”. We all got a good laugh out of it and then forgot all about it.

A month later when his appointment came up we sent down to records to have his sent up. My buddy in records came over to me a said that the record could not be found. There is a check out card that normally is place where the record belongs (the records are filed alphabetically in long bends.) and none could be found. So there was no way of knowing who took the record or when.

The next day when it came time for his appointment the lieutenant was told that due to the fact that his record was MIA (missing in action) he would have to extend his enrollment while we send to the Finance Center in Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana for a copy of his records. (This normally takes 30 to 60 days.) Needless to say, shook his head negative and held up his hands. I did the same to him.

the service members. And one of the older ladies had gone on 30 days leave. And when she did she just wiped everything on top of her desk into a drawer of her desk and locked the drawer and went on vacation. 15 days into the recovery of the records she comes back opens the drawer and started getting the stuff back out. When all of a sudden she holds up a record and ask “Is this the record you all been looking for?”  My buddy and I along with some friends where laughing so hard that tears came to our eye, the lieutenant was called the next day and on the following day he was out of the Army.


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