Knight of the Stone King - Vows and Honour

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Historical Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


This is the first episode of a TV series I wrote. It is too old fashioned to be made today; it's more of a nostalgic Sunday afternoon TV series.

Submitted: June 18, 2018

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Submitted: June 18, 2018

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KNIGHT OF THE STONE KING

“Vows and Honour”


ACT ONE

FADE IN:

EXT. BOSWORTH BATTLEFIELD - 22ND AUGUST 1485 - 11.00

We see the standard of Richard III, Blue and Murray with a White Boar. In the background we can hear the sounds of battle. We pan down the pole to the standard bearer, then across to King Richard III, on his horse surveying the battlefield. 

A Knight (WILLAM FITZHERBERT) comes up to him and bows. Behind him is EDWYN MILLER, his squire.  

KING RICHARD

Fitzherbert, what news of John Howard?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Sad to report my lord, the wound was mortal.

KING RICHARD looks across the battlefield, whilst looking...

KING RICHARD

Dear God how much more do you want from me? My wife, my son, my brothers. (beat)
Wait not all my brothers. (turns towards FITZHERBERT) FitzHerbert, I have a task for you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes my Lord.

KING RICHARD

Your Master, Francis, Lord Lovell: get him away from the Royal Bodyguard.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

My Lord, surely you can make more use of me than that? I would ride with you, my place is at your side.

KING RICHARD

(Enraged) Your place is where I command you to be. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes of course, I'm sorry my Lord.

KING RICHARD

(Mood softening) FitzHerbert, you are the most skilled man at arms in my army, that's why I have given this task to you. Keep Francis safe. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He won't want to be safe, he will want to fight for you as I do.

KING RICHARD

I cannot allow it. Francis is the nearest thing I have to a brother, he must be kept safe. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

But my lord surely there is no safer place than with the Royal Bodyguard?

KING RICHARD

Not today. Enough blood has been spilled by those who cannot wear the crown. Let the two protagonists be measured against each other in the fight for the kingdom.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

My Lord no! You're going to charge the Tudor aren't you?

KING RICHARD

Keep Francis safe until the battle is concluded.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

But my lord; the Stanleys.

KING RICHARD

Fitzherbert!  Would you disobey your king?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No my lord.

KING RICHARD

Then go, I will ride shortly.

KING RICHARD rides forward. EDWYN MILLER comes forward to talk to WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

EDWYN MILLER

Sir, what is it? What is going to happen?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You see the Tudor Banner? 

EDWYN MILLER

Yes.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Our King is going to ride down there with a few loyal knights. He might even get to the Tudor; but he will riding right across the front of the Stanleys. If they move...

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT cannot bear to finish the sentence.

EDWYN MILLER

What are we going to do?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We do our duty, we must move Lord Lovell to the rear. Then we pray.

CUT TO:


INT. MEDIEVAL TENT WITH TABLE - 22nd AUGUST 1485 – 11.08

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT enters the tent, closely followed by FRANCIS LOVELL and EDWYN MILLER.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think it's on this table, my Lord.

FRANCIS LOVELL

What is this evidence?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It's better if you see it for yourself, my Lord.  

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT searches the table, while he is doing so there are screams and cheers outside.

FRANCIS LOVELL

What's happening out there?

FRANCIS LOVELL rushes out of the tent. EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT look knowingly at each other, then follow him out.

CUT TO:


EXT. BOSWORTH BATTLEFIELD - 22ND AUGUST 1485 – 11.09

FRANCIS LOVELL rushes out of the tent closely followed by EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT. FRANCIS LOVELL looks down over the battlefield.

FRANCIS LOVELL

The King has charged, my God look at him go.

EDWYN MILLER 

Cheney has ridden out to stop him. The man mountain, no one can defeat Cheney.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Just keep watching.

EDWYN MILLER 

(Cheers) Cheney is unhorsed. 

Cheers go up all around, as the army will on their King and champion.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He's reached Brandon, the Standard Bearer.

EDWYN MILLER 

He's going to do it, the Tudor is faltering.

FRANCIS LOVELL

Go on Dicken.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh dear God, the Stanleys!

Chants of treason are heard all around. FRANCIS LOVELL turns away.

EDWYN MILLER 

Sir..

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT puts a hand on EDWYN MILLER'S shoulder. There is a moment's quiet as the armies pause in the background, taking in that the King is dead. 

FRANCIS LOVELL lunges at WILLIAM FITZHERBERT with his sword. Without thinking and with the skill of a seasoned warrior WILLIAM FITZHERBERT pushes EDWYN MILLER out of harms way. Parries the thrust and disarms FRANCIS LOVELL.

FRANCIS LOVELL

So you show your true colours? There was no evidence was there?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No my Lord, I am sorry I had to deceive you. The King ordered me to get you away from danger.

FRANCIS LOVELL

You should have told me, I should have been with Richard. As indeed I would have, had it not been for your treachery.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm sorry my Lord I could not disobey the King. In any case I did not want to. If I had, your blood too would be a stain upon this field, and that I could not bear. 

FRANCIS LOVELL

Well then, you must bear my hatred for what you've done.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

But you know me my Lord, have I not always been faithful to your household?

FRANCIS LOVELL

Yes and your treachery cut deeper than a lance. Leave now, leave my sight and my household. Thank your years of loyalty for staying my hand from ordering you executed.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Squire, remove my armour, quickly.

EDWYN MILLER starts to remove the armour. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT 

Whatever you think of me now, I will bear your hatred easier than I would bear your death. If it is no longer my honour to serve in your household, I shall serve no other lord. (beat) I have just one request.

FRANCIS LOVELL

You expect me to grant you a request?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It is not for me, but for my squire. His deeds have not offended you, I ask that my punishment not be visited upon him.

FRANCIS LOVELL

It seems your squire has shown his loyalty to you. However I cannot condemn the loyalty from him that I have found lacking in you. Squire, the shame of Sir William FitzHerbert is not yours, you shall remain in my service. I shall find other duties for you.

FRANCIS LOVELL walks away.

FADE OUT:


FADE IN:

EXT. CHIPPING NORTON MAIN STREET - 26th August 1485 – 12.28

A young woman (ELEANOUR READE) is being followed by two thugs (GABRIEL DRAKE and NED GARNETT). She is unaware of them as she turns down a side street. The two thugs follow her.

CUT TO:


EXT. CHIPPING NORTON SIDE STREET - 26th August 1485 – 12.28

ELEANOUR READE looks back and notices that two men have followed her.

Close up of the thugs’ faces smiling.

ELEANOUR READE

Oh no!
ELEANOUR READE starts to run and the thugs run after her, they catch her up and try to grab her bag off her.  

ELEANOUR READE
Let go, it's mine!

GABRIEL DRAKE

Come on, why don't you share?

NED GARNETT 

Yes come on love, play nice.

ELEANOUR READE 

I need this.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Well maybe we should let you keep it.
GABRIEL DRAKE strokes ELEANOUR READE'S hair unpleasantly.

GABRIEL DRAKE

We'll have to think of something else we can take.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT (O.C.)

Ah, two excretions of the foul gut of depravity, perhaps you would be interested in the offerings I have.

GABRIEL DRAKE

What do you want?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What I want, I fear is beyond your understanding, what this lady wants is obvious. Now you will let her go about her business. 

The two thugs attack WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, the fight is over as soon as it began, the two thugs never had a chance. In the scuffle ELEANOUR READE'S bag is thrown to one side.

ELEANOUR READE

Thank you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You are welcome, I am pledged to protect the King's people. 

ELEANOUR READE 

The King has no interest in me.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Alas you may be right, King Richard, third of that name, has been slain so there will be a change I’m sure.

ELEANOUR READE

Yes, we see the armies pass through but it makes no difference to us.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Richard passed laws to make things better for you.

ELEANOUR READE

Good king, bad king, it's all the same to us. The two thugs you saw, that's the kind of law we live under. There's all this talk about who fights for which king but who fights for us?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Is there no Justice of the Peace?

ELEANOUR READE

Of course there is, sometimes. He can't be everywhere though.

EDWYN MILLER walks up with the ELEANOUR READE'S bag.

EDWYN MILLER

Well at least you have your bag back.
(hands the bag to ELEANOUR READE)

ELEANOUR READE

Yes and I'm grateful, is there any way I can thank you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You can promise me you will not talk about what I have said. I have spoken more than is wise.

ELEANOUR READE

You have my word, to me you are just a stranger. But I would like to give you something. 

ELEANOUR READE reaches into her handbag and gives WILLIAM FITZHERBERT a sprig of Broome. 

ELEANOUR READE 

This might help to bring you luck.

ELEANOUR READE hurries off. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turns too, he puts the Broome in his pouch, then puts his hands on EDWYN MILLER’S shoulders.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What are you doing here?

EDWYN MILLER

Looking for you, sir.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It’s good to see you, but there is nothing for you here.

EDWYN MILLER

And what is there for you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's different, I have been banished from the household. You could have stayed.

EDWYN MILLER

I think I'm old enough now to be making my own decisions.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

But you are still a squire.

EDWYN MILLER

You know what everyone says about that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well you are a bit old for a squire.

EDWYN MILLER

Yes and you know why that is; you made me your squire.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Won't Lord Lovell be looking for you?

EDWYN MILLER

Lord Lovell is on the run himself, what harm can there be in being a fugitive from a fugitive?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Then let us fugitives find a tavern.

As they walk off together..

FADE TO BLACK:


FADE IN:

INT. TAVERN - 26th August 1485 – 12.37

EDWYN MILLER

You didn't want to go to the Inn?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(Keeping his voice down) Not now they've changed the colour of the Boar.

EDWYN MILLER

You can understand why though. The White Boar isn't going to be in favour with the new king.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh yes, I understand it; I just don't like it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT makes it clear that he doesn't want to discuss it any more, so EDWYN MILLER changes the subject.

EDWYN MILLER

So you're saving damsels in distress?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It's what we knights are famous for.

EDWYN MILLER

Not normally in the streets of Chipping Norton.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There seems to be no better place at the moment. 

EDWYN MILLER

I'll bet that's what she thinks. You saved her from those two parasites.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Today yes, but what about tomorrow, or next week?

EDWYN MILLER

Why did you head here anyway?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't know really I was just on the road heading back home when I met a couple of traders who were on their way here. I thought since there was a market here I would come and see what was happening.

EDWYN MILLER

I don't think there will be anything to go home to. I've heard that Lord Lovell's lands have been seized.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That is no surprise, in any case you're right, there is nothing there for me now. 

EDWYN MILLER 

So what do you intend to do now?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't really know, try and find some work. For now though, I'm going to finish this beer.

MORYS WENLOCK (O.C.)

Perhaps you would like to finish that elsewhere.

We see a man with a sword flanked by two other men (MORYS WENLOCK with JENLYNS THOMAS and SIMON ARUNDEL).

EDWYN MILLER

I think we are very comfortable here thank you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I apologise for my friend here; he is sometimes liable to be a bit hot headed.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh come on it's just another gang of thugs, we can take 'em.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I have a feeling this is not a gang of thugs, although I am sure some people have called them that.

MORYS WENLOCK

We are no gang of thugs, what they say about me I'm not sure. 

EDWYN MILLER

Who cares, whoever you are, you can't make us leave.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think he probably can, isn't that right Justice of the Peace?

EDWYN MILLER

Oops.

Move in to close up of Edwyn and FitzHerbert putting down their beer.

CUT TO:

INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE - 26th August 1485 - 12.45

One of the men comes in with EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, he secures them into the cells. 

CUT TO:


INT. CELL - 26th August 1485 – 12.45

EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walk in and look around while the door is being locked.

EDWYN MILLER

Well, this is going very well.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I've been in a lot worse situations.

EDWYN MILLER

So have I, but I don't intend to stay in this one for very long.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(Goes to the hole in the cell door and addresses his words as much out of the cell as he does to EDWYN MILLER)I would imagine the Justice has other ideas.

JENLYNS THOMAS appears at the hole in the door.

JENLYNS THOMAS

That's right.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Ah good, you're still here.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Yes, I'm still here.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Glad to hear it, we're all unprotected and vulnerable in here. We need someone to be on guard out there.

JENLYNS THOMAS

It's no good you trying to get around me. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh come now, you have us where you want us, surely we can have a bit of conversation.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Conversation? All right what shall we talk about, your accommodation?

EDWYN MILLER

It's terrible.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You've made yourself at home though.

EDWYN MILLER

I'm doing my best to make myself comfortable but I wouldn't call it homely.

JENLYNS THOMAS

It's not the best inn we have in this town but you'll get used to it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I can't say I have seen a place like it before.

JENLYNS THOMAS

It was the Justice's idea. He converted this house to a place he can use to keep law in the town. It's been very successful.

EDWYN MILLER

How long will we be here?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's a fair question.

JENLYNS THOMAS

I don't know, it will be up to the Justice.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What are we here for anyway?

JENLYNS THOMAS

You were involved in a bit of a scuffle in town.

EDWYN MILLER

We were helping that woman.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Maybe, maybe not. The Justice asked about you and you haven't been seen around here before. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I see, we're here because we're strangers.

JENLYNS THOMAS

He might be being a bit over cautious, but he wants to keep the town safe. He hasn't been here that long himself, so he tends to lock people up while he finds out about them. 

EDWYN MILLER

That doesn’t seem such a good policy from where I’m sitting.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Not been here long you say?

JENLYNS THOMAS

That’s right, he seems decent enough but I get the feeling he hasn’t done this before.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He does seem quite young for such a task?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Do you think so?

EDWYN MILLER

He thinks everyone is young, it’s his age.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

How long will he keep us locked up in here?

JENLYNS THOMAS

If you've done nothing wrong you'll be out soon enough. On the other hand..

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm not interested in any other hands. I'll just make myself comfortable for a while, it's nice to have the chance to relax.

EDWYN MILLER shakes his head in disbelief and then we pan up to the cell window and outside.

CUT TO:


EXT. MARKET SQUARE - 26th August 1485 - 13.00

We move through the crowd in the market until we come upon the MORYS WENLOCK talking to SIMON ARUNDEL.

MORYS WENLOCK

So they were here?

SIMON ARUNDEL

Yes they were chasing Eleanour.  

MORYS WENLOCK

Eleanour?

SIMON ARUNDEL

A young woman from the bath house.

MORYS WENLOCK

She doesn't have anything worth taking. 

SIMON ARUNDEL

Well at least nothing you can't buy down at the bath house. If you can afford it.

MORYS WENLOCK

We'd better have a word with Eleanour.

CUT TO:


EXT. WOODLAND CAMP. - 26th August 1485 - 15.17

A group of 9 thugs are there. GABRIEL DRAKE is addressing them. 

GABRIEL DRAKE

You go and get the girl with the bag. We'll be moving on soon and we'll need some entertainment for the road. 

NED GARNETT

We tried that before.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Don't worry about those two do gooders, they're stuck in the cells. 

NED GARNETT

We'd better get in quick before they get let out. 

GABRIEL DRAKE

Don't worry about that. This is a small town, they don't realise that having a cell window so easy to get at, isn't a good idea.

MATTHEW COLE appears with a bow and a quiver.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Those two won't be troubling us again.

FADE OUT:


ACT TWO

EXT. WOODLAND CAMP - 26th August 1485 - 15.19

GABRIEL DRAKE and MATTHEW COLE are walking away from the main group.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Listen: make your way into town and scout out the area. Find a good vantage point where you can shoot into the cell. Wait until dusk comes, leave it as long as you can before the light fails. You need the light to shoot them but the darkness to escape into. Now go.

GABRIEL DRAKE pats MATTHEW COLE on the arm, MATTHEW COLE nods and leaves. GABRIEL DRAKE heads back to main group

CUT TO:


INT. ELEANOUR READE'S HOUSE - 26th August 1485 - 16.17

ELEANOUR READE is brewing some herbs in a bowl. There is a knock on the door. She opens the door and steps back startled. 

MORYS WENLOCK is standing in the doorway. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Don't be alarmed, I just wanted to ask you about an incident you had in town earlier. 

ELEANOUR READE 

Sorry I've been a bit jumpy since it happened. Can I finish this tonic while we talk?

MORYS WENLOCK

Of course you can, is it for you?

ELEANOUR READE 

This one is for Madison Ingledew.

MORYS WENLOCK

Sounds as though that's not the only one you make? 

ELEANOUR READE

I make quite a few remedies for people around here. I may not be a proper apothecary but I don't cost as much.

MORYS WENLOCK

That's good to know. Did you have any of your remedies on you when you were attacked earlier?

ELEANOUR READE 

Just the herbs I use to make the remedies.  I didn't have anything that was any use to anyone. 

MORYS WENLOCK

I thought you might have been carrying something they wanted, you're sure you didn't have anything?

ELEANOUR READE

Nothing of value, everything is available for free up in the woods. They probably followed me from there.

MORYS WENLOCK 

Who followed you?

ELEANOUR READE 

Two members of the gang up there.

MORYS WENLOCK

Up in the woods?

ELEANOUR READE

Yes, they've been up there for about a week.

MORYS WENLOCK

I haven't seen them around here before.

ELEANOUR READE 

They don't come into town, I think they steal from the farms around the town. Their camp seems to be temporary so they might not be intending to stay long.

MORYS WENLOCK

They're not. I've come across gangs like this before. You're quite right, they prey off the people around the town, then they move on. But not before they stock up for the road.

ELEANOUR READE 

They might not be so keen to go come into town after running into that other stranger and his friend.

MORYS WENLOCK

You say they are strangers, so you haven't seen them before? 

ELEANOUR READE

No, today was the first time. I was glad to see them, but I'd rather have been introduced some other way. I wonder if he is still around?

MORYS WENLOCK 

I think he might still be around, I think I have him in my cell.

ELEANOUR READE 

He's not the one you should have locked up, what has he done?

MORYS WENLOCK

Well hold on, I'm not sure it is him. I have two men I don't recognise in the cell.

ELEANOUR READE

Why did you do that?

MORYS WENLOCK

It could be the two that attacked you, or the two that saved you. I've got a hunch I know which two they are. (beat) Can you come down to the cells in the morning and identify him?

ELEANOUR READE 

Yes of course. (beat) Wait a minute, I know how you can tell whether it's him or not. I gave him a sprig of Broome as thanks. If you have him in your cell, he should still have it.

MORYS WENLOCK

Good, well I'll leave you now, but I would be careful of that gang, they haven't gone yet and I have a feeling there will be more trouble before they go. Especially as you've seen who they are.

ELEANOUR READE

I'll be ready for them this time. They probably won't remember me though.

MORYS WENLOCK

I would. (He realises too late that he has said what he is thinking).
There is an awkward pause.

MORYS WENLOCK

Well .. er ..I'd better get back to my investigations. I have a man outside and he'll be wondering where I am.

ELEANOUR READE 

Yes bye then, I'll see you in town.

MORYS WENLOCK leaves. ELEANOUR READE smiles to herself and then searches through her ingredients and gets out a new pan.

CUT TO:


EXT. ELEANOUR READE'S HOUSE - 26th August 1485 - 16.20

SIMON ARUNDEL is keeping watch. Then MORYS WENLOCK walks up to him.

MORYS WENLOCK

Any sign of anything out here?

SIMON ARUNDEL

No, nothing. 

MORYS WENLOCK

All right, we'd better head back, but first I want to warn some of the local farms about a group of marauders in the wood.  The marauders are likely to take from the local farms, in fact they probably have already.

SIMON ARUNDEL

We haven't had any reports.

MORYS WENLOCK

They're very subtle, they tend to make the raids look like a predator took the livestock. They will probably stay close to the wood as well, so where could they hit from there?

SIMON ARUNDEL

There are six main keepers of livestock that they could get to easily from the wood, we could start with them.

MORYS WENLOCK

Good, we'd better get a move on, it'll be dark in a few hours.
MORYS WENLOCK and SIMON ARUNDEL ride off. We see the shadows beginning to get longer.

CUT TO:


INT. CELL - 26th August 1485 – 19.30 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER are sitting either side of the window back against the wall.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Are you sure you saw someone?

EDWYN MILLER

Of course I'm not sure, but I think I did. Why, don't you trust me?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh.. yes, I trust you. I was just asking that's all.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT takes a quick look out.

EDWYN MILLER

I think he was over there on the rise.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That'd be a good place to get a shot in here with a bow or a crossbow. 

EDWYN MILLER

Or a handgun.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No they won't use a handgun. Too noisy, not accurate and it produces smoke. If there is someone there, they'll want to be quick, quiet and away before they are noticed.

JENLYNS THOMAS

What are you two talking about in there?

EDWYN MILLER

Nothing, just go back to sleep.

JENLYNS THOMAS

What do you mean go back to sleep?
JENLYNS THOMAS appears at the door to the cell.

JENLYNS THOMAS

You two cheeky swines. (beat) Hang on a minute, why are you sitting up there like that?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Like what?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Like that, up against the wall?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Surely this is all right. We're in your cell, it's not as though we can do any harm here. 

JENLYNS THOMAS

That's what I'm worried about, you're not trying to escape are you? 

EDWYN MILLER

If we were trying to escape, we'd be out of here by now. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Edwyn, you're not helping.

EDWYN MILLER

Well, he acts as though this would be difficult to get out of.

JENLYNS THOMAS

We'll see about that.
JENLYNS THOMAS heads over to get the keys.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What are you doing?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Getting the keys then I'm coming in to see what you're up to.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No you mustn't!

JENLYNS THOMAS

You're bound to say that, now I know you're up to something.

FITZHERBERT

Look I give you my word, we aren't trying to escape, but you must stay out there. 
The sound of the door being unlocked.

EDWYN MILLER

Please, I think I saw someone out there. They looked as though they were trying to get a place to shoot in through the window.

JENLYNS THOMAS

How stupid do you think I am?
JENLYNS THOMAS opens the door an steps in with his bill hook in front of him. Almost immediately he steps in through the door, an arrow comes through the window and hits him in the shoulder and JENLYNS THOMAS falls to the floor. EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT pull him over to the wall.

JENLYNS THOMAS

(In pain) Don't answer that last question.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER look at his wound and wrap it to stop the bleeding.

EDWYN MILLER

Your secret is safe with us. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You'll be okay but we will need to get you to a medic, is there someone in town?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Yes, just down the street there is a surgeon, but if we try to move we'll be shot at again.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes, and whoever that is out there, can shoot very accurately.

EDWYN MILLER

You always stressed the importance of skilled archers.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Edwyn, you're not helping.

EDWYN MILLER

How about if I made a run for it?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(beat) All right.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh. (surprised) Well I'd better get ready then.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(looks up at the window) Just a minute.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT takes of his doublet and puts the handle of the bill through the arms making a sort of curtain. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Now, when I hold this over the window, he is bound to take a shot, when you see it hit this you get this man out of here as fast as you can. 

JENLYNS THOMAS

(Softly) Jenlyns.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Sorry What was that?

JENLYNS THOMAS

My name: it's Jenlyns, Jenlyns Thomas.

EDWYN MILLER

Good to meet you, Jenlyns.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There will be time for pleasantries later, when we are all safe. Now listen, once you're both through that door close it and then make your way out and down to the surgeon.

EDWYN MILLER

What about you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Don't worry about me, I've got the safe job staying here behind the wall.

EDWYN MILLER

Will that (pointing at the doublet) stop the arrows?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It'll certainly deflect them a bit.

EDWYN MILLER

Is there some way we can hold it taut?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That would be worse, the arrow would just pass through it. This way the doublet will take the power out of the arrow as it strikes. 
(getting himself into position) All right are you both ready?
EDWYN MILLER puts JENLYNS THOMAS's good arm over his shoulder and the two of them signal that they are ready.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT holds the doublet over the window. An arrow hits it. EDWYN MILLER and JENLYNS THOMAS make their move towards the door. A second arrow his and just drops into the cell after hitting the doublet. EDWYN MILLER and JENLYNS THOMAS get through the door as the third hits and falls into the cell. They close the door, a fourth arrow hits. They've made it, a fifth arrow hits.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

One more for luck.
A sixth arrow hits. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT lowers the doublet and then settles himself down. He examines his doublet.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT 

That’s done for this doublet, I'm going to look a bit impoverished now. (Shouts to the person outside the window) You’ve ruined a perfectly good doublet you know?
There is no answer.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well the light is beginning to fade, perhaps he’s gone.
CUT TO:

EXT. CELL - 26th August 1485 - 19.37
We see MATTHEW COLE outside the cell with a view in. He’s waiting. The light is fading but he can still see into the cell, though not clearly. A shape makes for the door inside the cell. Instantly MATTHEW COLE draws and shoots. A direct hit, the shape falls to the floor. We see MATTHEW COLE grin and then we push in on the cell window.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT (OS)

(Groans in pain) Hey, that was rather underhand, I thought you’d gone.
Silence.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT (OS)

I see you prefer to be the strong silent type eh?
Silence.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT (OS)

You know you aren’t much of a (groans in pain) conversationist.
Silence.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT (OS)

Suit yourself, I’ll just lie here until the Justice gets back. (groans in pain) I should warn you though, the Justice is not going to be very happy when he sees the blood on the floor in here. 
We see MATTHEW COLE come into view, he sneaks up underneath the window, stands up and puts the bow up to the window in order to finish WILLIAM FITZHERBERT off.
CUT TO:
INT. CELL - 26th August 1485 - 19.39
Inside the cell WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is still behind the wall, he looks up and sees the tip of an arrow come through the window. In one swift motion he rises up and using the bill handle he thrusts it out at the attacker hitting him squarely on the forehead and knocking him out. He then looks out of the window.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You’re a good shot, but not very bright. (Puts his doublet on the bill hook and waves it in the air) Fancy falling for the same trick twice. (beat) Still can’t hang around.
With that he dashes out of the cell and we see the cell door close behind him.
CUT TO:

INT. SURGEONS ROOM - 26th August 1485 - 20.13
JENLYNS THOMAS is sitting on the bed, his wound is dressed. He is on his own, asleep. The door opens and MORYS WENLOCK comes in. JENLYNS THOMAS wakes.

MORYS WENLOCK

How are you feeling?

JENLYNS THOMAS

(trying to get up) Oh fine, I..

MORYS WENLOCK

Stay there, I heard what happened.

JENLYNS THOMAS

How? 

MORYS WENLOCK 

The surgeon sent people out to look for me coming in to town. I came straight round. 

JENLYNS THOMAS 

Did you catch the man who did it?

MORYS WENLOCK 

Not yet, Arundel and others have gone out to see what they can find, but I don't think they'll find anything now that it's dark.

JENLYNS THOMAS

There is something else: those two you left me guarding.

MORYS WENLOCK

One of them brought you here, the Surgeon said.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Yes, and I left the door open so they will both have gone by now. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Well don't you worry about that now. Just take it easy and get fit again. I'll be round to see you tomorrow. 

JENLYNS THOMAS

I'll be ready, I'm going home later.

MORYS WENLOCK

I don't expect you to be ready, I expect you to be taking it easy.
JENLYNS THOMAS smiles and his eyelids get heavy, as he falls asleep again. MORYS WENLOCK leaves and looks back concerned but content that JENLYNS THOMAS is safe.
CUT TO:
INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE - 26th August 1485 - 20.15
Close up of the door into the room. The door opens and the MORYS WENLOCK walks in, as he does a sword appears at his chest. We pull back to see that it is WILLIAM FITZHERBERT with his sword pointed at MORYS WENLOCK. The two stare at each other for a moment.

MORYS WENLOCK 

You have me at a disadvantage.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't think so, I have no wish to harm you, and no wish to become a criminal.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT puts his sword down and hands it to MORYS WENLOCK.

MORYS WENLOCK

You keep it, it belongs to you anyway. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm indebted to you.

MORYS WENLOCK

I have a man that is in the Surgeon's only because you helped him get there.
EDWYN MILLER comes into view.

EDWYN MILLER

Actually that was me.

MORYS WENLOCK

Then my thanks go to both of you. I barely need to ask this but did you receive a gift from the woman you saved? 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(thinks for a moment) Yes I did, (gets it from his pouch) here it is.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT holds up the Broome.

MORYS WENLOCK

Good, now I know your story is true. But I must admit I was surprised to find you both here.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I know, we should really be back in the cell, but it is a bit dangerous in there.

EDWYN MILLER

Besides it's occupied.
MORYS WENLOCK goes over and looks inside the cell, through the small viewing hole in the cell door.
CUT TO:

INT. CELL - 26th August 1485 - 20.16
We see MATTHEW COLE, he looks towards the door, he has a big red bruise in the middle of his forehead.

EDWYN MILLER (OS)

He hasn't said anything, so we don't know who he is or why he was shooting at us.
CUT TO:

INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE - 26th August 1485 - 20.16

MORYS WENLOCK

(turning away from the cell door) I think I know who he is. He's with a gang of marauders  up in the woods.

EDWYN MILLER

But why did he come after us?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

My guess is, we thwarted two of their gang earlier and they had a grudge against us.

MORYS WENLOCK

My guess too. (beat) Why were you two still here, you could have gone?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We're not here to make trouble for you or anyone else, and we don't want to be fugitives. 

MORYS WENLOCK

I have a feeling there is more that you're not telling me.

EDWYN MILLER

There is: we haven't got anywhere else to go. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Well you're welcome to stay here tonight, it seems I can't get rid of you anyway. 
The three of them settle down.
CUT TO:

EXT. WOODLAND CAMP - 26th August 1485 - 21.00
GABRIEL DRAKE is pacing about impatiently. In the background we can see the camp. NED GARNETT is talking to two other thugs, then he walks away from those two and up to speak to GABRIEL DRAKE.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Where the hell is he? He should have been  here by now.

NED GARNETT

The men say he's been caught, he's in the cell. 

GABRIEL DRAKE

Caught, who by? The Justice was out of town, we saw him and those two do gooders were locked up. 

NED GARNETT

Not locked up well enough, it was that same one that bested us. He suckered him up to the bars, knocked him out and then dragged him inside.

GABRIEL DRAKE

And none of them tried to get him out of there? 

NED GARNETT

By the time they got near to him the do gooder was getting near so they had no choice but to leave him.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Of course they had a choice. 

NED GARNETT

Not if they were going to get the girl.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Still that do gooder is trouble. If they'd tried to fight him we would probably have three men in that cell now, and it time we move on anyway.

NED GARNETT

What about Cole?

GABRIEL DRAKE

We'll get him out.

NED GARNETT

How are we going to that, we've already lost one man?

GABRIEL DRAKE

We sent only three men in last time; this time we'll carry out a coordinated attack and take our enemies out one at a time. You and I will go in with two men, we'll set fire to the Justices's office.

NED GARNETT

But what about Cole, he's in there? Let's set fire to one of the other buildings.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Cole will be all right we don't want to burn the place down, but if we start a fire there, the Justice will have to try and put it out. In the meantime we will lead the do gooders out to the camp where the rest of the guys will be waiting. They might be able to fight, but even they will find those odds too much. 

NED GARNETT

All right we won't burn Cole but he'll still be stuck.

GABRIEL DRAKE

With them out of the way we can come back into town, the Justice will have no chance on his own and once we finish him off we can get Cole out.

NED GARNETT

I like it, we get revenge on those two, then we get Cole.

GABRIEL DRAKE

And we can always set a few extra buildings  alight before we leave. 
The two of them head back towards the main camp. We see ELEANOUR READE flanked by two of the thugs. GABRIEL DRAKE and NED GARNETT move towards her and we see a worried look on her face and.... 
FADE OUT:

ACT THREE
EXT. WOODLAND CAMP - 26th August 1485 – 21.02
ELEANOUR READE is surrounded by the thugs. 

ELEANOUR READE 

What do you intend to do with me?

GABRIEL DRAKE

Come on you're a woman of the world, I'm sure you can guess. I'm afraid you'll have to wait though. We have to go into town but we'll be back soon enough. In the meantime you can cook these men some supper, it'll keep them out of trouble while we're gone.

ELEANOUR READE 

What makes you think I will do that for them? 

GABRIEL DRAKE

If you don't, they might have to find some other way to amuse themselves for a few hours. (beat) Oh and I would make sure it tastes good, they will be your companions for some time to come and you don't want to upset them. 
ELEANOUR READE looks utterly defeated. GABRIEL DRAKE then turns to address his men. 

GABRIEL DRAKE

Come on Ned, we've got a bit of burning to do. 

NED GARNETT

I'm looking forward to it.

GABRIEL DRAKE

(Turns to the rest of the group) The rest of you, enjoy your supper but stay alert. We'll lead two men back to the woods, we'll call for you and then you'll get the jump on them. They are good but I reckon you'll be able to deal with them.
As the thugs cheer their support the camera pans up to the night sky.
CUT TO:
INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE - 26th August 1485 – 22.13
EDWYN MILLER and the MORYS WENLOCK are playing a board game, SIMON ARUNDEL is checking on MATTHEW COLE and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is cleaning his sword.

MORYS WENLOCK

You spend quite a lot of time looking after that sword.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I have to, it's not likely I will be able to afford another one anytime soon. 

MORYS WENLOCK

I could ask why you have it now.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Are you going to?

MORYS WENLOCK

I don't think it's necessary, besides I might not like the answer. I have enough enemies around here as it is. I could do with a few more friends.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We can all do with more friends. 

MORYS WENLOCK

You may have noticed that I am a man down, I could really do with a man who knows how to handle himself? 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Is it me, or is it getting a bit chilly?
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT goes over and picks up his jacket. He inspects it and looks at the holes in the back.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well, that will hardly keep the cold out.

MORYS WENLOCK

Arundel, take that doublet to the fripperer and get it patched. While you're there bring back a cloak.
SIMON ARUNDEL takes the doublet from WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and leaves the room.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I am obliged to you, but I'm afraid I may not have the funds for a new cloak and a repair to my doublet. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Consider it a loan. And while you're considering that, perhaps you would respond to my proposition.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Which proposition is that?

MORYS WENLOCK

The one I put to you before you so clumsily changed the subject.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Was it that obvious?

EDWYN MILLER

Yes.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Shouldn't you find out a bit more before me before you make such an offer?

MORYS WENLOCK

You had your sword at my chest and then offered to hand it over I would say that is test enough. Besides, I trust my instincts.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I too would be grateful for a friend, but let me be Frank, I cannot work for you.

MORYS WENLOCK

Cannot or will not?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If I were to do so I would break a solemn vow. I cannot do so and maintain my honour and therefore I will not.

MORYS WENLOCK

That's one of the most tortuous refusals I've ever heard.

EDWYN MILLER

He's like that all the time.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I must remain a friend with honour, if I were to serve you, my word that could no longer be trusted. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Then I must accept your refusal. Now we will say no more about it, Edwyn has waited long enough for me to make this move. 
We push in on the board game as WENLOCK makes his move then we....
DISSOLVE OUT:

DISSOLVE IN:
INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE - 27th August 1485 – 01.17

Close up of the board game, it's dark and it is not being used. We pull out and see all of them asleep except SIMON ARUNDEL. He hears something and then he thinks he can smell smoke. He wakes them all.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Wake up everyone, I think the roof is on fire.
They all waken and rush outside.
CUT TO:

EXT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE - 27th August 1485 – 01.18

As they get outside they turn and see that the roof is indeed on fire. EDWYN MILLER rushes to a trough and brings a bucket of water. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Yes, good idea, get water, let's get this put out.
They all go to get water and then GABRIEL DRAKE and NED GARNETT appear, they are laughing.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I should have known you two would be behind this. 

GABRIEL DRAKE

That's not all we're behind. We've also got that girl you were so fond of protecting. She's in the woods, if you want to come and get her. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'll be along directly and this time I won't just chase you off.
GABRIEL DRAKE and NED GARNETT ride off still laughing.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT makes to follow him but he is stopped by MORYS WENLOCK.

MORYS WENLOCK

Wait, it’s a trap.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Of course it's a trap. 

MORYS WENLOCK

You can't go rushing straight in.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That woman needs our help.

MORYS WENLOCK

Then we should go together.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You have to stay and fight the fire, so that just leaves me. I have to go, you know that.

MORYS WENLOCK

I know, but you don't know where they are. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

They went that way and I have a feeling they won't make it that difficult to follow.

MORYS WENLOCK

I don't like it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You don't have to, you need to put that fire out before it spreads. When you've done that you can come out and help me out.

MORYS WENLOCK

If it's not too late.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Don't underestimate me.

MORYS WENLOCK

All right... go.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT starts to make his way out of town in pursuit. As he turns to walk off..

MORYS WENLOCK

Hey FitzHerbert, that woman is called Eleanour, please bring her back.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT signals that he will and he walks off. The other three watch him go; then...

MORYS WENLOCK 

All right let's get this fire out. 
SIMON ARUNDEL and EDWYN MILLER start fighting the fire. MORYS WENLOCK goes to the nearest house and knocks on the door. A woman comes to the door. 

MORYS WENLOCK

There's a fire, wake your neighbours and get them to give us a hand.
The woman nods and goes back inside. MORYS WENLOCK rushes over to help the others, we see them fighting the fire and in the background the woman and a child come out and start knocking on the other doors. Close in in the water dowsing the flames and then....
CUT TO:

EXT. WOODS - 27th August 1485 – 01.35
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is stealthily making his way through the woods.

GABRIEL DRAKE (OC)

Come on do gooder, not far now.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You know I'm beginning to get heartily sick of that voice.
Up ahead there is a torchlight in the forest. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT comes out into a clearing with his hand on the hilt of his sword, ready for action.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Oh dear, you finally caught us up.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I have a feeling that was not altogether unexpected.

NED GARNETT

Hey you're not as dumb as you appear to be.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm counting on you two to redress that balance. 

NED GARNETT

What do you mean?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well done, that's a good start.

GABRIEL DRAKE

Well it's time to put an end to this little chat. (shouts) Isn't that right men? 
Nobody appears.

GABRIEL DRAKE

(shouts) Come on men, now is the time.
Still nobody appears.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well it seems as though it is just us again. 

GABRIEL DRAKE

Dammit where are they.
GABRIEL DRAKE and NED GARNETT look as though they are going to run. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT takes his cloak off and puts it to one side.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh don't tell me you are going to run again. Have you no honour? 

GABRIEL DRAKE

Does anyone?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes; I do. 
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT takes his sword off and puts it with his cloak. He stands before the other two unarmed.

GABRIEL DRAKE

You're willing to fight us two against one?

NED GARNETT

With you unarmed?
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT nods and takes a fighting stance.
NED GARNETT moves first and he is easily dodged by WILLIAM FITZHERBERT who strikes him in passing. Then while he appears to be occupied GABRIEL DRAKE lunges toward him. Again easily avoided and struck with a counter blow. This sets the pattern for the fight each attack easily countered with GABRIEL DRAKE and NED GARNETT getting slower and slower as they get more and more tired. Eventually WILLIAM FITZHERBERT has them both disarmed, completely tired out and at his mercy. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT picks up his sword and holds it at the throat of GABRIEL DRAKE.

GABRIEL DRAKE

I yield.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You yield? What good will that do?

GABRIEL DRAKE

But you are a man of honour.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

So you behave how you like and expect to be treated with honour. Yes I am a man of honour, but I am also a man of anger.
HERBERT raises his sword to strike GABRIEL DRAKE. He pauses, as if deciding then lowers his sword.
MORYS WENLOCK, EDWYN MILLER and SIMON ARUNDEL ride in.

MORYS WENLOCK

Fitzherbert, good to see you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

And you. Edwyn, I see you have gone up in the world and got yourself a horse.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT goes over to pick up his cloak.

EDWYN MILLER

It's just a loan.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You were here sooner than I thought. Though I have to say I've had all the fun I can get from these two.

SIMON ARUNDEL

We had a bit of help. Nearly the whole town turned out in the end. It seems our new Justice has more friends than he thought.

MORYS WENLOCK

Only two of them waiting for you, I felt sure you were headed into a trap. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think I was. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Let's get these two secure and then we can go and get Eleanour.
We see SIMON ARUNDEL get down off his horse with a length of rope, then..
CUT TO:

EXT. WOODLAND CAMP - 27th August 1485 – 01.42
The four of them come in to the camp where they are surprised to see ELEANOUR READE sitting at the fire surrounded by sleeping marauders.
MORYS WENLOCK goes over to ELEANOUR READE.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Are they....

MORYS WENLOCK

Are you all right, did they...

ELEANOUR READE 

I'm fine, and no they didn't... otherwise they would certainly be..... . They are all asleep, they'll wake up in the morning.

EDWYN MILLER

Funny they should all get tired and fall asleep at the same time.

ELEANOUR READE 

Yes, and just after they had eaten the potage I made for them. (Getting a bottle out of her bag) It must have been this sauce I put in it.

MORYS WENLOCK

Do you always carry that sort of thing around?

ELEANOUR READE

No but I did tell you I'd be ready for them this time.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I must remember never to upset you.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Why are you still here, I would have thought you would have gone back to town.

ELEANOUR READE 

And risk running into those other two? I knew they had a trap planned for you so I knew you would be coming out here. Don't take this personally, but now that you are here I would like to get home. 

MORYS WENLOCK

Of course; Arundel, escort this young lady and see she gets home safely. Then get someone to go and inform the Sheriff we have a group of marauders and we would like him to come and take them off our hands. 
SIMON ARUNDEL dismounts, ELEANOUR READE joins him and they leave the camp.  
MORYS WENLOCK turns to face the others.

MORYS WENLOCK

My guess is that these marauders haven't just been stealing from here, they have probably been around the county. I just ask one more favour of you, would you help me guard these dregs until the Sheriff gets here?

EDWYN MILLER

Well I don't mind. The only place we had to stay was your office and that isn't very habitable at the moment.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I quite agree, besides the last thing we want is for this gang to escape again.

MORYS WENLOCK

Edwyn, if you'll keep watch here, we'll go and get the other two over here. Once we have them all together and tied up then I'll take the first watch.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and MORYS WENLOCK leave. EDWYN MILLER stirs the potage, sniffs it and then puts the spoon back in.
CUT TO:

INT. TAVERN - 30th August 1485 – 14.13
We move in across the room until we see WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER drinking.

EDWYN MILLER

We're getting a bit later into the summer now. There's quite a bit of work on the land, but what will we do for work after that?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It's not just work, we also have to find somewhere to live. It's all right living as though we are on campaign, but the campaign season won't last forever.

JENLYNS THOMAS (OC)

In that case perhaps I can join you two for a drink, I might be of some small help.
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT look up to see JENLYNS THOMAS standing there with a package in his hand.

EDWYN MILLER

Thomas, good to see you up and about.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Well, I've had a few days off my feet. If it hadn't been for you two I wouldn't have been here at all. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh come now, anyone would have done the same. 

JENLYNS THOMAS

And I would be equally grateful to them if they did. But it was you two I have to thank so here I am with gifts.
JENLYNS THOMAS puts the bundle on the table in front of WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

JENLYNS THOMAS

(to WILLIAM FITZHERBERT) You first.

EDWYN MILLER

You didn't need to bring us gifts.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Indeed, seeing you making a recovery is gift enough.

JENLYNS THOMAS

I did not bring them because of need, I brought them because I wanted to. So please have the good grace to accept them.

EDWYN MILLER

That told us.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well in that case, let's see what I have.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT opens up the bundle and see his doublet, he opens up the doublet to inspect the holes. What he sees is a large shaped patch over the damaged area.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

My doublet!

JENLYNS THOMAS

Yes, I know the fripperer very well and he asked me to bring it to you. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Unusual Livery.

JENLYNS THOMAS

He repaired the holes but it still looked a bit of a mess, so his wife made that patch. She thought the shape of the holes seemed to be very similar to the King Stone so she made the patch that shape and sewed it on for you.

EDWYN MILLER

The King Stone?

JENLYNS THOMAS 

Yes it's one of the stones just outside of town. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(Inspecting the doublet) It's wonderful, but how much do I owe them for it?

JENLYNS THOMAS 

You owe them nothing for the doublet. The fripperer and I have come to an agreement.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I like it even more, thank you.

EDWYN MILLER

It's very fine work.

JENLYNS THOMAS

(to EDWYN MILLER) And now for your gift. Unfortunately I could not bring yours with me but once you have finished your drink we will go and get it.

EDWYN MILLER 

Very well, I shall look forward to it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Any news of the marauders we handed over to the Sheriff?

JENLYNS THOMAS

They have been a problem in several places around the county. So much so that they have been imprisoned for some considerable time. 

EDWYN MILLER

All of them? 

JENLYNS THOMAS

All except for the leader of the group.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What happened to him?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Let's just say he won't be won't be troubling anyone again.

EDWYN MILLER

Well, I'll drink to that.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT looks a bit disapproving at EDWYN MILLER but EDWYN MILLER just drinks up and puts his mug down. We push in on the mug and then...
CUT TO:
EXT. STREET OUTSIDE BLACKSMITH - 26th August 1485 – 12.37
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, JENLYNS THOMAS and EDWYN MILLER are walking down the street. JENLYNS THOMAS stops.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Here we are. This is where EDWYN MILLER gets his gift.

EDWYN MILLER

The Street?

JENLYNS THOMAS

No, the Blacksmith. I noticed that you don't have a sword. 

EDWYN MILLER

Don't tell me you've brought me a sword, that's too much.

JENLYNS THOMAS

I spoke to the smith and he told me he had an old blade he could rework for you. It won't be the finest, but it will do the job.

EDWYN MILLER

Thank you, that is a wonderful gift. 

JENLYNS THOMAS

Not as great as a life. Anyway, it isn't actually ready yet because it needs to be weighted and honed for you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

A truly special blade, but it will take some time to get it balanced right so I will leave you to it.

EDWYN MILLER

Are you sure?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes I have a few things to do, including thanking the Fripperer and his wife. I'll meet you back at the camp. Now go, I remember how exciting it is to get your first sword.
EDWYN MILLER and JENLYNS THOMAS go in towards the Blacksmith. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walks away along the road. We push in on the design of the King's Stone on his Jacket and then we ..
CUT TO:
EXT. KINGS STONE - 30th August 1485 – 19.47
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is standing in front of the King Stone. He is standing with his sword pointing down towards the ground.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

The King I served is dead and I have been exiled for carrying out my duty. So I stand now before a stone hewn from and rooted in this land. 
As an arch is only as strong as its weakest stone, so is a nation as strong as it's poorest citizen. Once the weakest stone fails so does the arch. Where ever I see anyone suffer injustice, I will fight with my sword in my hand and compassion in my heart. (lifts his sword upwards and kisses the hilt) I am a Knight of the Stone King and this is my vow. 
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT puts his sword back in his scabbard and then walks away.
FADE OUT:
END OF SHOW


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