Knight of the Stone King - Revenge and Past Deeds

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Historical Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


Episode 3 of 6 - TV series set in Mediaeval Chipping Norton

Submitted: June 20, 2018

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Submitted: June 20, 2018

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KNIGHT OF THE STONE KING
Episode 3
“REVENGE AND PAST DEEDS”
TEASER
FADE IN:
EXT. GROUNDS OF THE MANOR HOUSE – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 - 11.17
A young girl (JANE SANTON) is playing in the grounds. She is playing with a small rag doll. WALTER FAWSETT is watching her from a distance, he gets closer and checks that nobody is watching. He walks up to the girl.

WALTER FAWSETT

Hello Jane, that's a nice little doll you have there.

JANE SANTON

Hello.

WALTER FAWSETT

What's your dolly’s name?

JANE SANTON

She's called Raggy.

WALTER FAWSETT

Raggy. Well how would Raggy like to go and play down in the woods.

JANE SANTON

I'd better tell my Mummy.

WALTER FAWSETT

We don't need to do that, she can come and join us later on.

JANE SANTON

I don't know.

WALTER FAWSETT

You don't?
The man bends down and puts his ear to the doll.

WALTER FAWSETT

Raggy says she wants to go to the woods, you wouldn't want her to be sad do you?

JANE SANTON

No.

WALTER FAWSETT

Well come on then, we can tell your mother all about it later.

JANE SANTON

All right.
The man takes her hand and they walk calmly off.
CUT TO:
INT. MANOR HOUSE KITCHEN – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 - 11.23
The maid (CATHERINE SANTON) comes into the kitchen, bringing washing in and putting it down. She goes over to the door and opens it, then looks out. She looks for a moment and then goes out.
CUT TO:
INT. MANOR HOUSE KITCHEN – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 11.24
Catherine is looking for Jane, she begins to look more concerned. She calls for Jane and as she begins to fret...
FADE OUT:
ACT ONE
EXT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.03
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER are walking up the road. MORYS WENLOCK comes rushing out of his office and on to his horse.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What's the hurry?

MORYS WENLOCK

Have you seen a young girl, about 10 years old?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Not recently.

MORYS WENLOCK

Well keep your eyes open and let me know the minute you do.
MORYS WENLOCK rides off, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER are left looking baffled. SIMON ARUNDEL comes out of the office.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What's this about a girl?

SIMON ARUNDEL

You'd better come inside.
SIMON ARUNDEL goes to the door and EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.
CUT TO:
INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.04
Sitting in the office is JENLYNS THOMAS. SIMON ARUNDEL enters followed by EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

EDWYN MILLER

Thomas, good to see you back in the Justice's service.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes indeed, how are you?

JENLYNS THOMAS

I'm well, I get tired quickly, but I wanted to get back to work. Besides, they can't cope without me.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Hey, steady on.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes we'd better not cause a rift between you two, besides I still want to know what the Justice is in such a hurry about.

JENLYNS THOMAS

A young girl has gone missing from the Manor.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Wenlock mentioned a girl just before he rode off.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Her name is Jane and she's the Maid's daughter.

EDWYN MILLER

Perhaps she has just wandered off and got lost or something.

JENLYNS THOMAS

The staff at the manor have looked around and they can't find her, she's never gone missing before, so now we're beginning to get worried.

EDWYN MILLER

Okay well we'll keep our eyes open.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Please do, this kind of thing makes everyone very uneasy.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We can do a bit of looking around as well. I don't know what good we can do but we'll see what we can find out. If that's all right with Wenlock.

JENLYNS THOMAS

I'm sure he'll take all the help he can get.

SIMON ARUNDEL

You can be sure, he'll let you know if he isn't happy about it.

EDWYN MILLER

True enough.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well, the best thing we can do is tread lightly.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Just let us know if you do find anything.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It goes without saying, anyway we're not going to find anything in here so we'll get out there and see what we find.

SIMON ARUNDEL

I must also get out there.

JENLYNS THOMAS

I'll be here.
EDWYN MILLER, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and SIMON ARUNDEL leave the room and close the door. JENLYNS THOMAS sits alone for a moment and then the door opens again, EDWYN MILLER puts his head round the door.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh, and stay away from the cell window.
EDWYN MILLER and JENLYNS THOMAS laugh and EDWYN MILLER goes back out and closes the door.
CUT TO:
EXT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.06

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Come on, let's see what we can find.

EDWYN MILLER

Where shall we start.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I thought we could start at the tavern.

EDWYN MILLER

I like the sound of that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I thought you would.

EDWYN MILLER

It must be thirsty work this investigating, we always start our investigations in a pub.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There are two reasons for that. Firstly, you hear a lot of things in a tavern, and secondly, the ale is really good.

EDWYN MILLER

I knew it.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER head down the road to the tavern.
CUT TO:
INT. TAVERN – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.10
HARRY WENTWORTH is sitting talking to one of the customers (INGHAM BACON), he is pointing to the right side of his body and miming somebody punching it. As he see the door open he immediately stops and gets up.
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT enter the tavern.

HARRY WENTWORTH

Hello gents, the usual.

EDWYN MILLER

Lovely, thanks.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Splendid, do you mind if we join you both?

HARRY WENTWORTH

Fine with me.
INGHAM BACON signals his agreement. HARRY WENTWORTH goes out to get the drinks. EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT take a seat at the table.

EDWYN MILLER

It's rather quiet in here today?

INGHAM BACON

The Ale's good and the place is quiet, what could be better?

EDWYN MILLER

Oh, well we could go to another table if we're disturbing you?

INGHAM BACON

No, I didn't mean it like that, I just prefer it when it's not so busy. To be honest it can be a bit too quiet as well.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Why is it so quiet in here?

INGHAM BACON

Most people are out looking for Jane.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Is that the girl that has gone missing?

INGHAM BACON

Yes that's right.

EDWYN MILLER

We are going to look for her but we don't know where to start.
HARRY WENTWORTH comes back in with the drinks and he sets them down on the table.

HARRY WENTWORTH

That's the problem everyone has.

INGHAM BACON

I think they are all hoping to get some kind of reward.

EDWYN MILLER

What reward?

HARRY WENTWORTH

They are hoping to get something from Lord FitzAlan for being the one to find her.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It's good that he cares that much about his staff.

INGHAM BACON

Well, it's a bit more than that.

HARRY WENTWORTH

So they say.

EDWYN MILLER

This all sounds intriguing.

HARRY WENTWORTH

It's all gossip.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Right now it's all we have to go on.

INGHAM BACON

Lord FitzAlan was not one of the recently replacements from the new King. He has been here for some years. About ten years ago he employed the maid and she had a baby.

EDWYN MILLER

Sounds all right, what about the father?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think that's the point.

EDWYN MILLER

Ah.

INGHAM BACON

That's it, that's why they say he brought her into his household.

HARRY WENTWORTH

So now the child has been taken by someone because se might be the child of the Lord of the Manor.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What does the FitzAlan think about all this?

HARRY WENTWORTH

I don't know, he's always remained silent on the subject.

EDWYN MILLER

If he pays a ransom for the child, there will be more evidence to add to the story.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

And if he refuses and something happens to the child he'll be the villain of the peace anyway.

HARRY WENTWORTH

Either way it is bad for him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It could be even worse for Jane and her mother.

EDWYN MILLER

Perhaps we should speak with Jane's mother?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Absolutely right, we'll go up there next.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER drink up, they put their mugs down and we..
CUT TO:
INT. STORE – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.20
PETER SABELLA and SADDIQ SUAAD are in the store. PETER SABELLA is tidying, SADDIQ SUAAD is looking out of the window.

PETER SABELLA

I wish you would come away from that window, it's like watching some kind of predator.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Customers coming.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER enter.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Good day to you fine gentleman, how can I improve your day?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I was hoping you might be able to help us out.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Ah excellent, of course we would be happy to assist. Perhaps if you peruse our fine selection of merchandise it will help you reach fulfillment.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I was thinking more along the lines of information.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Think as much as you like, but don’t forget to shop while you are thinking.

EDWYN MILLER

(to Peter) Is he always like this?

PETER SABELLA

Only when he’s awake. What can we do for you two anyway?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What do you know about the disappearance of the girl from the Manor?

PETER SABELLA

Not a great deal. She called Jane, she’s the maid’s daughter and she was taken from the grounds of the House.

EDWYN MILLER

Nothing else?

PETER SABELLA

Those are the only facts.

SADDIQ SUAAD

There are many rumours though.

PETER SABELLA

You of all people should not listen to rumours.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I have not forgotten what happened to me, nor have I forgotten who helped. I shall speak of these rumours because it might help.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Do these rumours have anything to do with who they believe the father is?

SADDIQ SUAAD

Indeed, it is said that the father is Lord FitzAlan.

EDWYN MILLER

This is all sounding very familiar.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Is this a widespread rumour?

PETER SABELLA

Most people have mentioned it, those that didn't already know it have heard it in here so it's spreading fast.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I've never heard this spoken of before.

EDWYN MILLER

Neither have I.

SADDIQ SUAAD

There was no reason to, until the child went missing.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Perhaps.

PETER SABELLA

Whether it is true or not, the Justice has taken swift action on this. He has already been round to speak to us about it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We're just on our way to the Manor, so we'll see whether there has been any news there.

PETER SABELLA

What are you hoping to find out there?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't know, but I do know that if the child has been kidnapped, there will be a ransom demand soon enough.

EDWYN MILLER

If it's ransom she was taken for.
They all look at EDWYN MILLER and then each other, realising what those words could mean.
CUT TO:
EXT. WOOD – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.30
SIMON ARUNDEL comes riding up. He sits up in the saddle looking around for something or someone. He dismounts and looks on the ground for tracks. He looks concerned and then leads his horse into the woods on foot. After a short walk, he stops to see more tracks.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Why didn't you wait for me? What did you find?
SIMON ARUNDEL looks off into the woods looking very concerned and we...
CUT TO:
EXT. MANOR HOUSE GARDEN – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.40
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and MORYS WENLOCK are walking up the drive. Suddenly, EDWYN MILLER stops, looking ahead. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT realises he's stopped and then as he's about to ask why WILLIAM FITZHERBERT notices Matilda. He also recognises the smitten look on EDWYN MILLER'S face.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Perhaps you had better stay out here and check the grounds. Maybe speak to a few people out here.

EDWYN MILLER

Where are you going?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm going to go in and speak to Lord and Lady FitzAlan. They will probably want to know why we are snooping around their house. Especially when one of his household has gone missing.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT Heads off to the Manor house.
EDWYN MILLER lurks in the shadows. He watches for a while as MATILDA FITZALAN sits and sews. After a little while watching, EDWYN MILLER realises there is someone behind him, he spins round quickly to see CATHERINE SANTON standing behind him.
There is a tense moment as they both size each other up.

EDWYN MILLER

I'm Edwyn, I was just looking for clues about Jane, the missing girl.

CATHERINE SANTON

What makes you think you will find them out  here?

EDWYN MILLER

Actually, I'm just waiting until my associate has spoken to the Lord and Lady, after all we'd seem very suspicious.

CATHERINE SANTON

You do.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh well, I can assure you my intentions are..

CATHERINE SANTON

(smiles, in a slightly forced way) That's all right, I recognise you. Edwyn isn't it?

EDWYN MILLER

Yes, but I'm afraid you have the advantage of me.

CATHERINE SANTON

Not completely, my name is Catherine. It is my daughter you are looking for.

EDWYN MILLER

Then I will try ever the harder.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT comes walking up to them.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

The Lord and Lady are now aware that we are here, they are happy for us to take a look round.

EDWYN MILLER

May I introduce you to Catherine, this is Jane's mother.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Good day dear lady, we will do all we can to find your daughter.

CATHERINE SANTON

I'm grateful for your help.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Can I speak to you somewhere a little more private?

CATHERINE SANTON

Yes of course, let's go to the kitchen.

EDWYN MILLER

I'll stay here and look for clues.
As WILLIAM FITZHERBERT makes to walk off, CATHERINE SANTON walks up to EDWYN MILLER.

CATHERINE SANTON

What you are looking for is over there.

EDWYN MILLER

Eh?

CATHERINE SANTON

She is not going to notice you over here. Go on, she'll be glad of the company.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and CATHERINE SANTON walk off. EDWYN MILLER is still hesitant.
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.45
We follow two travelers (ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON) as they walk down the track, coming toward them is a horse pulling a covered cart. A man (BERNARD MOWBRAY) is leading the horse. As they get closer..

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Stay back friends, stay back. This cart is unclean.
We see that BERNARD MOWBRAY has a cloth covering his face.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I have a man here with the fever, I have no wish to pass it on to you or to those you love, so please stay back.
ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON stay back but suddenly they hear a strained shout from under the cover of the cart. They are very concerned and they look at the cart.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I can see that you hear the poor fellow, he is burned by the fever. A fearful sound it is, but not so bad as the sweat on his brow or the shivers of his body.
There is another outburst from the cart. ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON make towards the cart.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Oh I can see you are very brave men, so I will gladly take your help. I couldn't get the Surgeon in the last town to look at them. I would just ask that you cover your face, the smell from the infected sores is very strong.
ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON begin to falter.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Don't concern yourself, you'll be quite safe as long as you don't get any of the puss on you.
ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON begin to look even more concerned and they look at each other. Then they continue on their way.
BERNARD MOWBRAY watches them go and then leads the cart on. After a while he checks behind him.
He sees that the ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON are out of sight and hearing range.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

The folks around here aren't too bright. What the hell are they wandering around out here for anyway?
BERNARD MOWBRAY walks round to the back of the cart. He lifts up the cover and there is a cage beneath it. Tied up in the cage is MORYS WENLOCK, he's gagged. We can't tell what he is saying for the gag. As he lunges toward BERNARD MOWBRAY but is held by the rope in the cage.

MORYS WENLOCK

Let me out of here!

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Sorry Justice I cannot understand your pleas.

MORYS WENLOCK

I don't know who you are, but you're making a really big mistake.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I'm sorry, there is no right of appeal here.

MORYS WENLOCK

I'll get out of here, and when I do you'll regret it.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

No no it's no good you making a speech, your jury isn't interested. They've wandered off. And with the routes I'll be taking it's not likely we'll see anyone else.

MORYS WENLOCK

I'll kill you.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I know, it'll take a bit longer to get where we're going but it'll be worth it.
BERNARD MOWBRAY prepares to pull the covers back down over the cage.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

(smiles) For me at least.
BERNARD MOWBRAY pulls the covers back down over the  cage as MORYS WENLOCK hurls abuse at him. BERNARD MOWBRAY, laughing, goes back round to the horse and leads them off.
FADE OUT:
ACT TWO
EXT. HUT IN WOODS – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 14.50
JANE SANTON is playing with WALTER FAWSETT, she looks happy and doesn't seem to be in any danger. We pan around to see that SIMON ARUNDEL is watching from the woods. He hasn't been spotted but he's looking around, he suspects a trap.
After looking for a while, he slips away back into the woods.
CUT TO:
INT. KITCHEN – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.05
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is sitting in the kitchen, cleaning his sword. CATHERINE SANTON enters and stops instantly, looking at the sword.

CATHERINE SANTON

Oh, I hope you aren't intending to use that here.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If I did it would only be to protect those with me. I was just keeping myself occupied while you were at your duties.

CATHERINE SANTON

Yes, it's unfortunate but the Lord and Lady of the Manor do tend to interrupt from time to time. Anyway where was I?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You were just saying about collecting the washing.

CATHERINE SANTON

Yes that's it I came into the Kitchen with the washing, set it down and then I thought I ought to look out and see what Jane was up to. I couldn't see her which was unusual, she doesn't usually go anywhere. I went out and searched but she was gone.
CATHERINE SANTON slumps down in her chair, crying. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT goes over to comfort her. CATHERINE SANTON puts her hand up, signifying that she is all right.

CATHERINE SANTON

Sorry, I find it hard sometimes but it won't help, I know.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I understand, believe me I've lost people before so I know how you feel.

CATHERINE SANTON

Have you lost a child?
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turns and walks over to a wall, he looks up as he remembers past events in his life.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No I haven't, I was never had a child given or taken.

CATHERINE SANTON

Was your wife...?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

My wife was cursed: cursed with the need to help others. Only thing was that she was not immune to diseases that ailed the people she cared for. We never had the chance to start a family.

CATHERINE SANTON

I'm sorry I shouldn't have mentioned it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(turns back and manages a small smile) I loved her more than life itself and in all the time since she died I have never spoken of her; never wanted to.

CATHERINE SANTON

What was her name?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's the strange thing; it is Katherine, just like yours.

CATHERINE SANTON

Perhaps you were meant to tell me about her?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You know, I think you could be right about that, she would've liked you.

CATHERINE SANTON

She must have had good taste.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT just smiles and nods, he pauses silently for a moment and then…

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I have to ask you something; it's a bit delicate.

CATHERINE SANTON

I thought there must be. You wanted to speak somewhere private, and you have been building up to it for a while now.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It's about Jane's father.

CATHERINE SANTON

Oh is that all? Well if you find him, let me know.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There are rumours.

CATHERINE SANTON

There are always rumours. Are these about the father being Lord FitzAlan?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You've heard them?

CATHERINE SANTON

It was all over town when I first came here, but I hadn't heard it again until just recently.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Any idea why these rumours have just surfaced again now?

CATHERINE SANTON

I don't know. I would have thought that it was because Jane had just gone missing but it started just before she went missing.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Could they be linked?

CATHERINE SANTON

It seems quite likely but I don't know in what way.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If you think of any reason, will you let me know?

CATHERINE SANTON

I will.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Very well, I had better get back into town and see what else I can find out.

CATHERINE SANTON

Will you be taking your friend with you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Probably, if I can get him out from the bushes.

CATHERINE SANTON

I'll come with you, I need to check on Matilda.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

The Lord and Lady's daughter?

CATHERINE SANTON

That's right.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What do you need to check on?

CATHERINE SANTON

There was a stranger watching her from the bushes.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and CATHERINE SANTON smile at each other and then leave the kitchen, shutting the door behind them.
CUT TO:
EXT. MANOR HOUSE GARDEN – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.06
EDWYN MILLER and MATILDA FITZALAN are sitting and talking, they are getting on very well.

EDWYN MILLER

Look I'm sorry I had to ask.

MATILDA FITZALAN

Well you are certainly forward. Especially for someone who spent so long in the bushes.

EDWYN MILLER

I didn't think you had seen me.

MATILDA FITZALAN

I probably wouldn't have done normally, but with Jane having gone missing we're all on a bit of an alert at the moment.

EDWYN MILLER

It's a good job that FitzHerbert went to introduce himself to your father.

MATILDA FITZALAN

It was indeed, I was on the verge of sending for one of the staff to come and see who you were.

EDWYN MILLER

Why didn't you?

MATILDA FITZALAN

I don't know, perhaps I just like your face.

EDWYN MILLER

Really, perhaps one day you'll tell me the real reason.

MATILDA FITZALAN

Perhaps, (gives a knowing smile).

EDWYN MILLER

Well, in that case how about answering the question I asked before?

MATILDA FITZALAN

All right. The answer is that I have heard the rumours but I am an only child.

EDWYN MILLER

Is there any chance that there could be any truth to the rumours?

MATILDA FITZALAN

Not if my mother is to be believed.

EDWYN MILLER

Why what did she tell you?

MATILDA FITZALAN

It isn't the kind of subject a mother shares with a daughter, or indeed the kind of subject a woman shares with (pause) a friend.

EDWYN MILLER

So you won't ever tell me?

MATILDA FITZALAN

I didn't say that; we might not always be friends.

EDWYN MILLER

That may be so, but you will never be your enemy.

MATILDA FITZALAN

There are two routes you can take from friendship.
While MATILDA FITZALAN and EDWYN MILLER look at each other and take in the consequences of those words WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and CATHERINE SANTON walk up.

EDWYN MILLER

Ah there you are.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes indeed, and I think it is time we were getting back into town. I have found out all I need to know from here.

EDWYN MILLER

Very well (to MATILDA FITZALAN), good day dear lady (takes her hand and kisses it).

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(to CATHERINE SANTON) and you dear lady (puts his hand on her shoulder) I look forward to seeing you again with news that your daughter is safe.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER walk away from the two women.

MATILDA FITZALAN

I think they will find Jane, there is more to them than meets the eye.

CATHERINE SANTON

They seem almost like a knight and squire.

MATILDA FITZALAN

Edwyn is a bit old for a squire though isn't he?
As they watch EDWYN MILLER and FitzHerbert walk off, we see EDWYN MILLER turn and wave to MATILDA FITZALAN. MATILDA FITZALAN waves back, CATHERINE SANTON looks at her as she does.
CUT TO:
EXT. ROAD BETWEEN THE MANOR HOUSE AND TOWN – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.15
SIMON ARUNDEL is galloping along the road, he sees EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and he pulls up, to an abrupt stop.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Thank God; I need your help.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It seems very urgent, I'm guessing it is more than just looking for Jane.

SIMON ARUNDEL

That's just it; I've found Jane. I need your help to go and get her.

EDWYN MILLER

I thought the Justice would have got her, if you know where she is.

SIMON ARUNDEL

So would I and that's another reason why I need your help. Wenlock has gone missing.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Gone missing?

SIMON ARUNDEL

Yes I found his horse up near the woods. He was nowhere around and there is no way he would leave him like that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Could he be lying injured somewhere?

SIMON ARUNDEL

That's what I thought. I looked around for him but there was no sign of him. He's just vanished.

EDWYN MILLER

At least we know where Jane is so perhaps we should sort that problem first.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think you're right and in any case, I think that these two things are related in some way.

SIMON ARUNDEL

You think that whoever kidnapped Jane is also the one who is responsible for the disappearance of Wenlock?

EDWYN MILLER

Well it would seem logical.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Too logical.
EDWYN MILLER and SIMON ARUNDEL look at WILLIAM FITZHERBERT quizzically.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

The rumours about the Maid's daughter and the Lord FitzAlan started just before Jane was taken. If it had been just after I could understand it because people would be talking about her, but why just before?

SIMON ARUNDEL

It doesn't make sense.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think it does. Edwyn and I would have come and looked for this child whatever her status. I don't know about Wenlock, but the only way the kidnapper could be sure he would get the attention of the Justice is if there was a special reason to find the child.

EDWYN MILLER

Jane was not the real target, Wenlock was?

SIMON ARUNDEL

So we have been distracted from the more important person.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I wouldn't say that, there is a woman back at the Manor who would say that we were looking for the more important person.

EDWYN MILLER

Well I say we should go and get Jane while we know her location.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Agreed. Arundel, you'd better lead the way.
They make their way down the road back the way SIMON ARUNDEL had come from. Then WILLIAM FITZHERBERT stops.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Wait a minute.
SIMON ARUNDEL turns back to him and EDWYN MILLER also comes up to hear what WILLIAM FITZHERBERT has to say and we...
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.30
BERNARD MOWBRAY is pulling the cart along he stops and parks the cart.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I just need to stop here for a moment. I hope you don't mind. It's all the drinking I've been doing to celebrate your capture.
BERNARD MOWBRAY laughs as he heads to the undergrowth.
CUT TO:
INT. CART – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.30
MORYS WENLOCK listens for a moment and then begins to throw himself at both sides of the cart, making it rock from side to side.
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.31
The cart is rocking from side to side, we close in on one of the wheels and we can see that the spokes are weakening.
CUT TO:
INT. CART – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.31
MORYS WENLOCK continues making the cart rock from side to side. then suddenly the cover is pulled up and BERNARD MOWBRAY is standing there smiling.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

What do you think you are going to achieve like that? Supposing you did manage to turn the cart on its side; you'll still be stuck in that cage. Perhaps you like it in there, it was easy enough to trap you after all. I've trapped many a beast in many lands and few have been as easily fooled as you were.
Again BERNARD MOWBRAY laughs as he covers up the cage again while MORYS WENLOCK protests. BERNARD MOWBRAY leads the cart off and as we focus in on the weakness on one of the wheels we..
CUT TO:
EXT. HUT IN THE WOODS – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.58
WALTER FAWSETT and JANE SANTON are playing outside when, WALTER FAWSETT notices WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walking up to the house.

WALTER FAWSETT

Jane, why don't you go and wait inside?

JANE SANTON

But I want to play.

WALTER FAWSETT

I know, we'll play again soon but you have to go inside for a minute.
JANE SANTON goes inside.

WALTER FAWSETT

Can I help you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Possibly; I'm looking for a little girl, she's gone missing.

WALTER FAWSETT

I'll keep an eye open for her if you tell me what she looks like.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Surely; she looks just like the little girl you were playing with.

WALTER FAWSETT

Well I would certainly notice her if I saw her.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What job do you do?

WALTER FAWSETT

I don't see that is any of your business.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh I'm just being friendly, what's the harm in a simple question like that?

WALTER FAWSETT

All right, I do a little bit here and a little bit there.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I wouldn't have thought there was much to do in this wood.

WALTER FAWSETT

I like to keep my own company which is why I don't like people coming and snooping around.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Would you mind if I had a look inside your hut, then I'll leave you in peace.

WALTER FAWSETT

I think it would be better if you were to leave without seeing inside the hut.
WALTER FAWSETT moves towards the hut and reaches for something behind the woodpile.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

But if I did that I wouldn't know what you have in the hut.

WALTER FAWSETT

(pulling out his sword) Well you will just have to live with that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I had no idea you felt so strongly about it.

WALTER FAWSETT

Well now you know and I suggest you just leave.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Do you think it is right for a young child to see blood spilled; yours or mine?

WALTER FAWSETT

You know the way to avoid that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes I do, but not without achieving what I came here for.

WALTER FAWSETT

I'm sure you'll live with the disappointment, for a little while anyway.
WALTER FAWSETT moves towards WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and catches him off guard, but WILLIAM FITZHERBERT gets his sword up just in time. WALTER FAWSETT fights aggressively and with some skill. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is barely holding on. He gets pushed back away from the hut and behind a group of trees.
We see EDWYN MILLER go into the hut.
CUT TO:
EXT. CLEARING IN THE WOODS – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 15.59
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is still being forced back.  WALTER FAWSETT stops for a moment.

WALTER FAWSETT

Look I have no desire to hurt anyone, please just leave me alone.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I can't do that; I have to see whether the girl I am looking for is in there.

WALTER FAWSETT

I cannot let you in to the hut.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Then our dice are cast.

WALTER FAWSETT

Are you sure you want that, you are no match for my sword.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You certainly have an unusual style.

WALTER FAWSETT

Not where I come from.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well I might as well carry on; I'm learning all the time and I might get lucky.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT makes a move which WALTER FAWSETT parries easily and we..
CUT TO:
EXT. IN THE WOOD BEHIND THE HUT – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 16.04
SIMON ARUNDEL and CATHERINE SANTON are waiting. EDWYN MILLER races up with JANE SANTON. JANE SANTON instantly cheers up when she sees her mother. CATHERINE SANTON picks her up and enfolds her in a hug.

CATHERINE SANTON

Oh thank you both, how did you find her?

EDWYN MILLER

That was all down to him (points at SIMON ARUNDEL)

SIMON ARUNDEL

I know this place well, I can tell when something doesn't seem quite right.

CATHERINE SANTON

Well I'm indebted to you, and grateful to you both.

EDWYN MILLER

Well I'll take you back to the Manor. I'm sure you'll be happy to be back home with your mum won't you?
JANE SANTON nods, while cuddling Raggy.

CATHERINE SANTON

What about FitzHerbert?

EDWYN MILLER

O don't worry about him, he'll be just fine. The main thing is to get you two home.
CATHERINE SANTON smiles and walks off with JANE SANTON. EDWYN MILLER is about to follow, he turns to SIMON ARUNDEL.

EDWYN MILLER

Perhaps you should keep an eye on him, in case he needs a hand.
The two of them laugh and then EDWYN MILLER follows CATHERINE SANTON and JANE SANTON. SIMON ARUNDEL goes back towards the hut.
CUT TO:
EXT. CLEARING IN THE WOODS – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 16.06
The uneven sword fight continues. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT has the look of a man on the verge of defeat. He is forced back yet farther. When it looks as though all is lost, WALTER FAWSETT stops once again.

WALTER FAWSETT

It seems you did get lucky after all.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Really?

WALTER FAWSETT

Yes; I've proven my point and shown my resolve, but I was sincere in my offer. Even now if you would put up your sword I will let you walk away unharmed.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It's a tempting offer, but if I did that I would not be able to live with myself.

WALTER FAWSETT

Then prepare not to live at all.
WALTER FAWSETT makes his move again as we ...
FADE OUT:
ACT THREE
EXT. IN THE WOOD BEHIND THE HUT – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 16.06
While they are walking away EDWYN MILLER stops, raises his fingers to his lips and gives a loud distinctive whistle. CATHERINE SANTON turns and looks at EDWYN MILLER.

EDWYN MILLER

I think we are far enough away now.
EDWYN MILLER raises his fingers to his lips again as we..
CUT TO:
EXT. CLEARING IN THE WOOD – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 16.06
As the two men clash again, there is a whistle and for the first time WILLIAM FITZHERBERT comes out on top. WALTER FAWSETT looks concerned. The whole fight changes dramatically as WILLIAM FITZHERBERT begins to completely dominate the fight. It becomes clear that he has been pretending to lose the fight. In a very short time WALTER FAWSETT is overpowered.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I have no desire to hurt you, but I have very little respect for men who abduct young children. It is in your best interest to tell me why you took her and what you did with the Justice.

WALTER FAWSETT

You've got it all wrong, I was only keeping Jane here for a few days. She was perfectly safe and nothing was going to happen to her. I was going to take her back return her to her proper place after that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You came and took a child from her mother, and I suspect you are the person who started the rumours in the town about the Child's father.

WALTER FAWSETT

What rumour? I know nothing of any rumours. I brought Jane out here to keep her safe; that's all.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Keep her safe from what.

WALTER FAWSETT

(sudden realisation) Jane! We must get back to the Cabin.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Don't worry, Jane is safely back with her Mother now.

WALTER FAWSETT

What?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Your style of swordplay is somewhat different, but I've come across it before. I just needed to give my associates a chance to get Jane out with as little trauma as possible.

WALTER FAWSETT

You're quite sure she's safe?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You have my word.

WALTER FAWSETT

What about if I don't tell you who is behind this?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We'll still keep her safe, that is not dependent on your cooperation.

WALTER FAWSETT

She has good people around her.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

One of the best of those is the Justice and he has gone missing. You know something about that?

WALTER FAWSETT

The person you are looking for is Bernard Mowbray. He used Jane to lure the Justice out here. I don't know why, or what he has planned.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

How did you get involved?

WALTER FAWSETT

I have a loose mouth particularly when it is lubricated by drink and he made sure it was well lubricated. I told him about a young girl at the Manor and he said he had plans for her.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Those plans involved taking her from the Manor?

WALTER FAWSETT

Yes, but he didn't care what happened to her. He said he would kill her and leave her in the woods.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Why would he do that to a young girl?

WALTER FAWSETT

He doesn't care about her, he just wanted to lure the Justice out here. I said I would help abduct the Girl and keep her hidden as long as he didn't hurt her.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

So his true target was the Justice?

WALTER FAWSETT

Yes but I don't know what he intends to do or where he's heading.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I know where he is going, what I can't understand is why you didn't use your sword arm to stop him.

WALTER FAWSETT

As you have found out I'm not that good, especially not when I'm drunk. Besides he has friends.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I've no doubt; in fact that's where he'll be heading.
SIMON ARUNDEL comes up to the two of them.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Shall we take him back to the Justice's Office?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No, there is no time. We need to get after Wenlock straight away. We will tie him up in the hut and come back for him later.
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 16.16
BERNARD MOWBRAY is leading the cart over a rocky bit of road, we focus again on the weak bit of the cart wheel. It creaks and then cracks under the stresses of the drive.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Damn it.
He goes round to investigate the damage. Then he pulls the cover off to reveal MORYS WENLOCK leaning over having fallen against the side of the cage with the broken wheel.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Well I don't know which looks the sorrier; you or the cart.
BERNARD MOWBRAY opens the cart; he unties the rope that ties MORYS WENLOCK to the cart and then leads him (still bound) to a tree and ties him to it. MORYS WENLOCK looks at the broken cart and then back down the track from whence he came.
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK NEAR THE WOOD WITH THE HUT – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 16.06

SIMON ARUNDEL

Are you sure it is all right to leave him in the hut like that?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No I'm not, but what would you rather be doing; escorting him back to the cell, or helping me find Wenlock.

SIMON ARUNDEL

I see your point, but how will we find him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well I think we have a few things in our favour; among them them are that Mowbray won't be in a great hurry because he is expecting a couple more days head start,  and he will be slowed down by a cart and an uncooperative captive.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT looks at SIMON ARUNDEL and gives a half smile trying to reassure himself as much as his companion, then we...
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 16.16
Focus in on the wrists of Wenlock, now unbound. He is rubbing them, trying to bring some life back to his hands. We pull out to see that he is back in the cage but the cage is no longer on the cart. He picks up a mug of water and drinks from it, he then picks  up a piece of bread and eats a bit of it.
Outside the cage we see that BERNARD MOWBRAY is sitting and eating. He puts down his food and walks over to speak to MORYS WENLOCK.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Have you nothing to say?
MORYS WENLOCK just glares he says nothing.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

No threats or profanity?
Still MORYS WENLOCK says nothing.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

All right, I know I said if you make any noise the gag goes back on, but that was just to stop you shouting out loud. But here we are on this quiet track with noone around to hear us if we talk normally and I'm sure you have a lot of questions about why I'm doing this and what I intend to do with you.

MORYS WENLOCK

It sounds as though you are going to tell me anyway.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

You're damn right.

MORYS WENLOCK

Then why don't with start with the basics; who the hell are you?

BERNARD MOWBRAY

My name? My name is Mowbray; as was my father and his father and so on back when we owned the estate near Faringdon that your father stole from my father.

MORYS WENLOCK

I have no idea what you are talking about?

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Of course not, your father sold it straight away. He had no need of it, it was just given to him by the King for services rendered.

MORYS WENLOCK

So my father chose the right side and yours didn't and now all these years later you blame me.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I blame your father but he is beyond my reach now, so I visit his punishment on you.

MORYS WENLOCK

You don't think that will get your land back do you?

BERNARD MOWBRAY

No, of course not. I don't want the land I want revenge.

MORYS WENLOCK

Revenge for being on the wrong side of the King's favours?

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Yes. That land was to be left to me by my father but I had to find another way in life. I went to sea which was a hard life but each day I thought of my revenge and I learnt the skills I needed to exact it upon you.

MORYS WENLOCK

I'm flattered; I assume that's where you learnt to set the trap that I fell into.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Compared to some of the beasts I've trapped in my travels you were easy. You walked into it like the simplest of them.

MORYS WENLOCK

Like them, I didn't expect a snake in the grass.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Oh, you wound me. Never mind I'll live with it, things will be different for you I fear.

MORYS WENLOCK

Why don't you just get on with it then. It is clear that you intend to kill me, so why don't you do it here? Why are you going to all this trouble?

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Kill you? I have no intention of killing you. I have something much better in mind for you. I am going to take you to sea.

MORYS WENLOCK

It's always nice to travel.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Not in your case. I have a ship ready to transport you and once we are at sea, you will be put to work and worked like a dog. So much so that you will look forward to the day you leave the ship.

MORYS WENLOCK

And when I do, I will come after you seeking my own revenge.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I have no doubt of it, that's why I have something planned for you when you do leave the ship. In my travels I have dealt in many goods; one tribe in a port on the southern Mediterranean Sea are particularly keen on buying men as slaves.

MORYS WENLOCK

You won't get much of a price for a half worked to death skivvy.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Hardly anything, which means you'll be brought by a really low class purchaser. It won't be good business, but it will be satisfying.
BERNARD MOWBRAY laughs and goes back to his food. MORYS WENLOCK puts his down and pushes it away as we..
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 19.27
SIMON ARUNDEL and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT are walking along, Arundel stops and looks at the ground.

SIMON ARUNDEL

A cart certainly came this way recently but then this is a cart track.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Good let's press on.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Wait! We've been on this track since you asked me the route to the south coast, but how do we know this is the right way?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We don't know for certain, but I have good reason to suspect it.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Would you care to enlighten me?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

When I fought that man back there I noticed two things: one was his rolling gait and the second was his style of fighting. Both are the kind you would expect of people that spend a lot of time at sea.
Now he could be heading to any of the ports, the South and the West being the closest. There are two reasons I think it is the south; firstly the man's accent and secondly because it is busier down there.
 
When I asked you to point out the track to the south coast, I said to point out the one that was least used because I suspect that whatever the person wants with Wenlock he will want to be secretive about it. So here we are on that track with fresh cart tracks, which although not unusual on the main route can't be too common here.
 
The problem is that there are more than one port on the south coast so we have to catch them before the routes to those ports split.
 
If you have a better suggestion as to where they are heading I'm happy to follow it. Do you?

SIMON ARUNDEL

No.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Look, I'm not trying to be clever. I have a theory as to where he is. I'm happy to listen to other reasoning but I don't think we can afford to sit and do nothing.

SIMON ARUNDEL

And I am not trying to be awkward. I asked that you explain your reasoning, and that you have done. So let's go.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Right.
The two men set off again down the dirt track and we watch them go, then we...
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 3RD SEPTEMBER 1485 – 19.46
The ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON are sitting around a camp. They are  surprised by SIMON ARUNDEL and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, even though SIMON ARUNDEL and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walked up openly.

ADAM BEDLINGTON

What do you you want, we have nothing.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Relax friend, we only seek to speak with you.

ADAM BEDLINGTON

I'm afraid even that is beyond my brother.

SIMON ARUNDEL

I'm sorry to hear that, but we'll be brief anyway.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Have you seen anyone come this way today.

ADAM BEDLINGTON

Just one man, he had a infected passenger on a cart.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Did you see this passenger?

ADAM BEDLINGTON

No, but we heard him. He was under a cover on the cart. At first I thought it was someone shouting for help but it was incoherent, it must have been the fever.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Thank you for your help, I have been looking for this sick man.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT takes out a coin and gives it to the ADAM BEDLINGTON.

ADAM BEDLINGTON

Thank you sir.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I will you give you two more for your two lamps.
JAMES BEDLINGTON passes him the two lamps and takes the two coins.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Good evening to you both, and thank you.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and SIMON ARUNDEL walk off as they go we see ADAM BEDLINGTON and JAMES BEDLINGTON are very happy with the coins they have been given. We keep up with WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and SIMON ARUNDEL.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Sounds as though you were right, I'll wager that sick man was Wenlock.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes, and what they heard really were cries for help.

SIMON ARUNDEL

You paid a high price for these lamps.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We need them. The only way we are going to catch up with this Mowbray character is if we keep moving through the night. We can't track them without light.

SIMON ARUNDEL

I'm not sure I will be able to track him by lamp light.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I have every faith in you.

SIMON ARUNDEL

You mean, you have no choice.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Actually, it's both.
We watch the two of them heading along the cart track. Then we...
CUT TO:
EXT. CART TRACK – 4th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 06.13
It is a misty morning. BERNARD MOWBRAY is sleeping leaning up against a tree. In the cage MORYS WENLOCK is also restlessly sleeping. MORYS WENLOCK wakes and looks around but sees nothing. He sits up, which wakens BERNARD MOWBRAY. We close in on BERNARD MOWBRAY and then he speaks.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

What are you up to?
MORYS WENLOCK lies down again and BERNARD MOWBRAY settles back against the tree. Immediately he does so a bill appears at his throat. We pull back to see that SIMON ARUNDEL is holding the bill, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT appears from behind another tree.

MORYS WENLOCK

Am I dreaming?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No you are not and the nightmare is now ended.
While they continue talking WILLIAM FITZHERBERT frees MORYS WENLOCK from the cage and cuts the ropes binding him.

MORYS WENLOCK

How did you find me?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You have Arundel to thank for that. I don't know many people who could track at night.

MORYS WENLOCK

At night?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We knew we had to catch up with you. (looks at the broken wheel of the cart) Lucky for us that the wheel broke.

MORYS WENLOCK

It would not have held us up long, he would have taken it to the wheelwright this morning.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well we will have to do the same.
MORYS WENLOCK walks up to BERNARD MOWBRAY.

MORYS WENLOCK

I have no knowledge of the wrong you say I have done to you. You will now be taken back in the same cage you used. I will hand you over to the Sheriff and you can explain your grievance to him.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

I will not be taken anywhere like a dog in a cage.

MORYS WENLOCK

It's the same cage you put me in.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

You are the son of a thief.

MORYS WENLOCK

If you will not wait to say that before the Sheriff I will not suffer you to say it here or anywhere else.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Then you will have to try and silence me with a sword in your hand unless you are a coward as well as the son of a thief.

MORYS WENLOCK

I am neither.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Then you will face me alone in single combat?

MORYS WENLOCK

It will be a pleasure.

BERNARD MOWBRAY

Though only a brief one, and when I have killed you will your men let me go free?

MORYS WENLOCK

They will not interfere. (to SIMON ARUNDEL and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT) Let him get his sword.
SIMON ARUNDEL lowers his sword and BERNARD MOWBRAY walks back over to the tree where is sword is leaning.
MORYS WENLOCK turns and walks over to WILLIAM FITZHERBERT. It is clear that MORYS WENLOCK is still stiff from his captivity.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Are you mad, you are the Justice of the Peace, you should take him for trial.

MORYS WENLOCK

Not this time, lend me your sword.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You are fatigued, stiff and you want to use an unfamiliar sword. I know your arm is good but if you insist on using my sword then let me lend my arm as well.

MORYS WENLOCK

No, it is a matter of honour.
The two men look at each other in silent battle of wills and then we hear the cry of BERNARD MOWBRAY charging with his sword to strike at MORYS WENLOCK before he is ready.
Before MORYS WENLOCK can react, and as WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turns to face the attack BERNARD MOWBRAY stops dead and we pan out to see that he is impaled on SIMON ARUNDEL'S bill. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and MORYS WENLOCK look at him.
SIMON ARUNDEL looks MORYS WENLOCK straight in the eye.

SIMON ARUNDEL

There are some things about which you cannot speak for me.
MORYS WENLOCK and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT look at each other each one raising an eyebrow.
CUT TO:
EXT. MAIN ROAD TO THE TOWN – 4th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 19.07
EDWYN MILLER rides up to meet SIMON ARUNDEL, MORYS WENLOCK and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

EDWYN MILLER

Good to see you all.

MORYS WENLOCK

Good day, and my thanks to you for your part in this.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Did you get the man in the Hut?

EDWYN MILLER

No, I'm afraid he had gone by the time we got there. He had freed himself somehow.

MORYS WENLOCK

Well never mind, he was only a bit part player in the story. Now, if you would just do one more thing. Escort me back to the Office, these two will not let me go alone and they are dog tired after being up all night.

EDWYN MILLER

Of course.
The companions pat each other as a sign of departure and all head off in different directions.
CUT TO:
EXT. MANOR HOUSE GARDEN – 4th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 19.23
WALTER FAWSETT is standing watching the grounds from a concealed hiding place.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT (OC)

You escaped the ropes.

WALTER FAWSETT

The ropes were tied expertly but they were not intended to hold permanently.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Only a sea going man would know how to untie them.

WALTER FAWSETT

Only a sea going man would know how to tie them.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I was not long at sea, only a couple of years. I never got over the sea sickness.

WALTER FAWSETT

You let me go, why?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You would have let me go.

WALTER FAWSETT

I had no desire to hurt anyone.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Neither do I, but I cannot allow you to stay around here. Anyway you are taking quite a risk to come here and see your daughter.

WALTER FAWSETT

How did you know?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Why else would you be so keen to keep her safe, that you would risk the wrath of the Justice? And then having done so you would come back one more time to see her.

WALTER FAWSETT

I should never have left. I panicked when I heard Catherine was with child. I ran off to sea.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yet you did not take her away with you when you had the chance.

WALTER FAWSETT

She has a better life than I could give her, and I am too late now to make up for my mistake. Will you keep an eye on her for me.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I will

WALTER FAWSETT

Then I know she will be safe.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You must do something in return.

WALTER FAWSETT

Name it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Do not let drink loosen your tongue where your daughter is concerned.

WALTER FAWSETT

I will do that.
WALTER FAWSETT leaves the Manor garden.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT watches him go.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I must get to my bed, what a day, or two.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leaves the manor garden and we watch as he walks back towards town.
FADE OUT:
END SHOW


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