Knight of the Stone King - Hatred and Pride

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Historical Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


Episode 4 of 6 - TV series set in Mediaeval Chipping Norton

Submitted: June 22, 2018

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Submitted: June 21, 2018

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KNIGHT OF THE STONE KING
Hatred and Pride
TEASER
INT. TAVERN 12th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 22.05
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER are sitting at a table drinking, neither have their swords with them.

EDWYN MILLER

Here's one for you. A horse walks in to a tavern, the bartender says “Why the long face.”
EDWYN MILLER laughs at this, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT looks bemused.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Your jokes don't get any better you know.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh come on that's a classic, people will still be telling that in hundreds of years time.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You don't paint a very good picture of the future. Here let me buy you another drink, it'll keep you quiet.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT heads over to the HENRY WENTWORTH'S table, as he is on his way there he bumps into a large unsavoury looking character (RALF SCURFIELD) and makes him spill his drink. As RALF SCURFIELD turns around we can see a livery badge, a crescent.

RALF SCURFIELD

Oi watch, where you're going you idiot.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm very sorry, let me buy you a drink.

RALF SCURFIELD

Yeh, I'll have another drink, you're not as dumb as you look.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Barman, please replace this man's drink on me and I'll have two more as well.

RALF SCURFIELD

Two drinks, no wonder you're all over the place.
RALF SCURFIELD stands in a threatening way, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT looks at him briefly and then turns to the HENRY WENTWORTH, then puts the money on the table. He then walks back to his seat.

RALF SCURFIELD

Don't worry, you keep the drink, I prefer to drink in the company of men not women and children.
RALF SCURFIELD laughs haughtily as he leaves the tavern.
CUT TO:
EXT. TAVERN 12th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 22.05
RALF SCURFIELD, comes out of the tavern and stands, from the darkness comes another man (ARNALD HARBUT)with the same livery badge.

ARNALD HARBUT

How did it go?

RALF SCURFIELD

Perfect, there is no-one to stand against us, the town is ours.
FADE OUT:
ACT ONE
INT. TAVERN 12th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 22.07

EDWYN MILLER

What was that all about?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh nothing, I just spilled his drink.

EDWYN MILLER

He was a horrible character.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

None of us is perfect.

EDWYN MILLER

No, but most of us get a little closer than that. I don't know why you put up with him talking to you like that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well, I did spill his drink.

EDWYN MILLER

I know but you bought him another one, he should have been more pleasant about it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We can only help out, we can't change everybody's attitude.

EDWYN MILLER

You could have changed his, if you'd used your sword.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It takes more than a sword to be a good person.

EDWYN MILLER

It helps others to see your point of view though.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Are you sure? I think it is just a way of making people say they agree with you.

EDWYN MILLER

All right I suppose it helps you to win a fight rather than an argument but I would have thought you could have a bit of fun as well.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Fun? Is that why you think I am going to the trouble of training you, just so that you can use your sword arm for fun.

EDWYN MILLER

No, of course not. You don't have to be so touchy about it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What did you think of King Richard as a warrior?

EDWYN MILLER

What kind of question is that? He was an excellent soldier.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What did you think of him when he was in a joust?

EDWYN MILLER

I never saw him take part in one.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Nor would you, he never took part in them. He thought that battles were serious affairs and not to be taken lightly. He had no desire to take extra battles on to his shoulders.

EDWYN MILLER

An attitude that you clearly agree with.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No question. Come on drink up, we'd better get off home.

EDWYN MILLER

Okay, I just hope we dont run into that big  fellow on the the way home.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Don't worry, I don't think he is very interested in us.
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT get up to leave as they are going...

EDWYN MILLER

I wonder what they do want.
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leave the tavern, the other customers watch them go and then get back to drinking they're ale, talking and gambling.
CUT TO:
INT. SHOP 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 9.07
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walk into town, they walk up the street and into a shop.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Good day to you both, can I interest you in any of our fine products?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Not today, thank you.

SADDIQ SUAAD

(laughs) Then why are you in my shop, you should make room for proper customers.

EDWYN MILLER

I don't think I can afford the things you sell.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Oh now that's a very hasty judgement, come I will show you treasures fit for any pocket.
SADDIQ SUAAD takes EDWYN MILLER off to one side, Peter comes out from the back of the shop.

PETER SABELLA

William, good to see you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

And you my friend, how's business?

PETER SABELLA

It's very good. I see Saddiq has another victim.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Indeed he has, that's probably why you are doing so well.

PETER SABELLA

It always has been. I take it you got the message that we have a little job for you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes we did, we're always happy to help our landlords.

PETER SABELLA

I knew there had to be a reason you are here, it can't just be to lay yourself open to Saddiq's impressive sales technique.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We'd better not stay too long, so you'd better tell me what you need doing.

PETER SABELLA

It's a delivery. We've had a tapestry come in for Lady FitzAllen. It's an expensive item so we want to be sure it gets there safely. Though I don't know whether there is anyone around that we don't know.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There is. I've seen a man in the village wearing a crescent moon livery badge.

PETER SABELLA

Do you think there is any significance in the badge?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It could be the Northumberland badge, they're a household from the north so no-one will know them around here. They walked away from the Battle at Bosworth and so they might be deserters from that army.

PETER SABELLA

But you can't be sure?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No I can't, they have abandoned their colours, so the full livery is not displayed.

PETER SABELLA

That makes sense, if you've deserted, you don't want everyone to know which household you deserted from.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's my concern. If they are using a badge, there must be more of them. I just don't know how many and what they're up to.

PETER SABELLA

Well, whatever it is, they will have come to the attention of the Justice.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

The Justice would have had them locked up by now if he suspected them of anything, he did with Edwyn and me. That means that they are keeping their nose clean.

PETER SABELLA

There's nothing wrong with that.
EDWYN MILLER and SADDIQ SUAAD come back over to them.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes but what worries me is that they are not trying to be friendly with the locals as well. Worse than that, I have a bad feeling and I've learnt to trust my instincts.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Instincts are not everything, you need fine silk as well.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Thanks I have all I need for now.

PETER SABELLA

I don't think they want to buy anything.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Nonsense, everyone wants to buy something, we just have to find the thing they want. Look, Edwyn has found what he wants.
PETER rolls his eyes.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What have you bought?

EDWYN MILLER

A Napkin.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Not just any Napkin, a finely crafted silk napkin, perfect for wiping away nasal excretions with maximum style.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Are you sure you want one of those?

SADDIQ SUAAD

Of course he does, look he's given me the money for it.
SADDIQ hands the money over to PETER. Peter took it and put it in the chest.

PETER SABELLA

So what do you think those men are here for?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Could be anything, could be nothing. Until they make a move, how can we tell?

EDWYN MILLER

What do you mean men? There was only one, and if you had fought him last night, he would not be around to do anything.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't want to spend my whole life fighting people.

EDWYN MILLER

Not much danger of that, based on last night's performance.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's as it should be.
While they are talking, PETER SABELLA goes to get the tapestry.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Have you spoken to the Justice about this man?

EDWYN MILLER

No we haven't.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What would we tell him the crime was. It's not a crime to be unpleasant. All the same, I would keep an eye on my stock if I were you two.

PETER SABELLA

We will, thanks for the tip, at least the tapestry will be safe.
PETER SABELLA hands the tapestry to WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No problem. Now I think we had better get out of here, I can see Saddiq circling with a hungry look in his eye.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Well come back any time, bring a full purse.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER leave the shop. As they go out of the door they hear...

RALF SCURFIELD

Hey mind you don't bump into anyone, you wight spill their drink. You don't look as though you can afford to buy many more drinks.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turns the other way and begins to walk off. EDWYN MILLER stops.

EDWYN MILLER

You can run if you want to, I'm going to shut his mouth.
As EDWYN MILLER makes to walk back. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT stops him, then grabs him and starts marching him away. While he is marching him off in the direction of the Justice's office.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What are you doing? We have to get this tapestry to the Manor.

EDWYN MILLER

Fine you take it, I'm going to sort this man out.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Don't be silly.

EDWYN MILLER

You don't believe I can, do you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's not it at all.

EDWYN MILLER

What is then?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What has he done wrong, apart from goading us?

EDWYN MILLER

That's enough reason for me, but then again I haven't lost my nerve.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No but you've lost your senses. We have become established here. If you go and attack him, you'll have picked a fight and the Justice will have good reason to lock you up.

EDWYN MILLER

Is that all?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Isn't that enough?

EDWYN MILLER

No, it isn't, not when my pride is concerned.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Then we must keep your pride under control.
We see WILLIAM FITZHERBERT march him down the road towards the Justice's office while we hear RALF SCURFIELD laughing in the background.
CUT TO:
INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 9.15
MORYS WENLOCK is sitting in his office, SIMON ARUNDEL is standing with his bill in his hand.
The door opens and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT manhandles EDWYN MILLER in to the office. SIMON ARUNDEL reacts, putting his bill out towards the intruders.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Sorry for the intrusion, but I need to get this hot head off the street.

MORYS WENLOCK

My cell is not occupied at the moment, but if I am to fill it I would at least like to know why it is I have done so.

EDWYN MILLER

It’s nothing, he’s just in a mood because he’s too scared to face some bloke in the pub.

MORYS WENLOCK

And what do you propose to do about it?

EDWYN MILLER

I’ll face him myself.

MORYS WENLOCK

All right, Arundel escort our guest to the cell. I’m not convinced that he should stay there but I have sufficient reason to discuss it.
SIMON ARUNDEL takes EDWYN MILLER to the cell and locks him in.

MORYS WENLOCK

This man wouldn’t happen to be the big fellow with the half moon badge would it?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You’ve seen him?

MORYS WENLOCK

I have, and I’ve heard talk about him. Apparently, he has been asking about you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It’s always nice to be popular, but I wonder what he’s after.

MORYS WENLOCK

He seems to be trying to provoke a fight, not just with you but with several people.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Not with us though.

MORYS WENLOCK

Yes, that’s right he seems to have the sense to be polite to us. He also stops short of starting a fight himself.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He must have guessed that you would pick him up if he did.

MORYS WENLOCK

I’m just waiting for the excuse.

SIMON ARUNDEL

I don’t know why we don’t just take him in anyway.

MORYS WENLOCK

There is a line between the law and unpleasant behaviour. If he has done nothing wrong, he is no different to any other unpleasant person in the town, (pause) except for one thing.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What’s that?

MORYS WENLOCK

The people he is being unpleasant to.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Yes, apart from you two, he’s been getting at Goliath Jones, Ned the Smith and the Metcalfe brothers.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Sounds like he has a death wish, although I wouldn’t have though he’d be in much trouble from Goliath?

SIMON ARUNDEL

That’s true, when you know him, but most people would be concerned about him just because of his size.

MORYS WENLOCK

No there’s more to this stranger than meets the eye. If it were a straight forward death wish he’d have involved us too. He’s also stopping short of starting a fight.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Could he be testing us?

MORYS WENLOCK

That’s what I’m wondering, but why?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Whatever the reason, I think it would be better if Edwyn was kept in here for the time being. At least until we can work out what is going on.

MORYS WENLOCK

Agreed.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Do you mind if I tell him?

MORYS WENLOCK

Do you want to?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No, but I feel I ought to.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT goes over to the cell door.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh hello Judas, what can I do for you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm sorry but you're going to have to stay here a little while.

EDWYN MILLER

You convinced the Justice then did you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes, I wish I didn't have to but..

EDWYN MILLER

But what? But you're sorry you don't have the courage to stand up to someone bigger than you are.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh come on Edwyn don't be like that.

EDWYN MILLER

Why not? Things probably look at bit different from your side of the door.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm sure that's true. Things aren't quite the way you see it.
EDWYN MILLER comes up to the cell door to speak more privately with WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

EDWYN MILLER

Are you sure things aren't the way you see it? (pause) You know I really thought we had something going here. Something good, we were helping people, trying to make things better.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We are doing that.

EDWYN MILLER

We were, until you lost your nerve. Now you won't stand your ground, what use is a warrior that runs from the battle.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What use is a warrior that runs headlong into the battle when he doesn't know the enemy's disposition?

EDWYN MILLER

Yes, that's right. You always have a fancy speech for any situation. Why don't you go and explain it to that big bloke? I'm sure he'll listen to you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Look I know you're upset about this.

EDWYN MILLER

I'm not upset, I'm angry.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

All right, you're angry. But try to understand that there is a reason beyond what you think.

EDWYN MILLER

Why don't you spell it out for me? We have a man in the town that treats us like dirt. Instead of teaching him some manners we walk away and leave him to bully the rest of the town.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I can see there is no convincing you. I'll be back later. Once I have this all figured out, things will get back to normal.

EDWYN MILLER

I doubt that very much.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What do you mean?

EDWYN MILLER

Once I'm out of here, I'm going to move on.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You must do what you think is right. I'll be sorry to see you go though: a good squire is hard to come by.

EDWYN MILLER

You've been very good to me, I would never have become a squire if it hadn't been for you. I always looked forward to being a knight alongside you. I realise that was never going to happen now. I wanted to stay as your squire, but a squire must respect the knight he serves. I no longer feel that respect, so it is better for us both if I leave.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Very well, I can see there is no convincing you. I have to get this tapestry to the manor. I will be back to see you, even though I may not be able to regain your respect but I hope that you will understand. In any case I would like to say goodbye.
EDWYN MILLER looks at WILLIAM FITZHERBERT for a while and then shrugs and turns away. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turns and walks away from the door.

MORYS WENLOCK

I'm guessing that didn't go as well as you were hoping.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Was it that obvious?

MORYS WENLOCK

Not to everyone perhaps, but I am the justice, it's my job to spot these things.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well, if you spot what that stranger is doing let me know will you?

MORYS WENLOCK

I'm not making any promises, (pause) except one. I'll try speaking to Edwyn while you are out. Perhaps once he has calmed down he'll be more reasonable.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I wouldn't count on it, but thanks.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leaves.
EXT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 9.25
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT makes his way up the street towards the Manor, he has the tapestry in his hand. We watch him go and then swing round to see RALF SCURFIELD watching him go and smiling.
FADE OUT:
ACT TWO
EXT. LORD FITZALAN'S MANOR. 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 9.35
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walks up to the door and knocks.
CATHERINE SANTON answers the door.

CATHERINE SANTON

Oh hello William, what have you brought for us this time?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

This time I have brought, so I’m told, the finest tapestry in the area.

CATHERINE SANTON

Well you’d better come in then.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT enters and the door is closed.
CUT TO:
INT. LORD FITZALAN'S MANOR - KITCHEN. 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 9.36
JANE SANTON is hanging some clothes up.

JANE SANTON

Uncle Will!

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Hello Jane, helping your mum with her washing?

CATHERINE SANTON

She certainly is, but I think we should all sit for a minute or two and I’ll get some juice for us.
CATHERINE SANTON goes to get the mugs of juice, as she does JANE SANTON sits down and leans over to WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

JANE SANTON

Uncle Will, where is Edwyn?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He’s busy at the moment so he couldn’t come up here with me.

JANE SANTON

Ohh, I like it when he comes to visit.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I know, but he can’t come every day. Don’t you like it when I come to visit?
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT pretends to look hurt.

JANE SANTON

Yes, of course I do Uncle Will.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Good so do I.
CATHERINE brings over the mugs and puts them on the table.

CATHERINE SANTON

It’s not like Edwyn to miss a chance to come up here. He must be very busy indeed.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Let’s just say he is enjoying the hospitality of the Justice.

CATHERINE SANTON

What's he done?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Nothing, I asked the Justice to lock him up so that he didn't get himself into any trouble.

CATHERINE SANTON

I'll bet he didn't take well to that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You're not wrong. In fact he's so upset, you might not see him around here after today.

CATHERINE SANTON

Now I know it must be serious. He's usually glad of any reason to come up here.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think he has seen somebody up here he likes.

CATHERINE SANTON

Curiously, there is someone that the Lord's Daughter seems very keen on.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Hopefully it might be enough to keep him here, but they are from such different backgrounds it probably wouldn't have become anything more than a passing fancy.

CATHERINE SANTON

Well you're not very romantic. I like to think that love will find a way.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You're right, let's hope it finds a way this time. In the meantime, I'd better get this tapestry delivered.

CATHERINE SANTON

You'd better finish your drink first.

JANE SANTON

Then can we go and see the horse?

CATHERINE SANTON

Not just now, you can go over to the stables in a minute.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Why don't you tell me all about the horse while we drink our juice?

JANE SANTON

Well, it's a little horse.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Oh I see..
CUT TO:
INT. LORD FITZALAN'S MANOR - KITCHEN. 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 9.36
LADY FITZALAN and Matilda are sitting in a room in the manor. There is a knock at the door.

LADY FITZALAN

Enter.
CATHERINE SANTON enters.

CATHERINE SANTON

Excuse me my lady, your tapestry has arrived.
MATILDA FITZALAN sits up and takes notice, waiting to see who is coming in.

LADY FITZALAN

Send him in.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT enters.
MATILDA FITZALAN is disappointed.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Hello my Lady, here is the item you purchased from the store.

LADY FITZALAN

Excellent, put it over here on the table would you?
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT puts it on the table and opens the packet for her to inspect.

LADY FITZALAN

It's as wonderful as I remember it, I have just the place to hang it.
LADY FITZALAN covers it back up.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well if you are happy with it my lady I will get back into town.

LADY FITZALAN

Has my maid given you a drink?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Indeed she has My Lady, a very nice mug of juice and a nice chat with her daughter.

MATILDA FITZALAN

Is Edwyn with her now?

CATHERINE SANTON

I'm afraid not My Lady, she is with the stable hand.

LADY FITZALAN

Looking at the new horse I would imagine.

MATILDA FITZALAN

It is a very fine horse, Mother.

LADY FITZALAN

And so it should be the amount your Father paid for her.

As she is saying that, LORD FITZALAN comes into the room.

LORD FITZALAN

Worth every bit that I paid. Don't you think so FitzHerbert?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't know my Lord.

LORD FITZALAN

Come now don't be shy, I think you know more about horses than you are saying.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I know about horses, I just haven't seen yours so I can't comment.

LORD FITZALAN

Well we must put that right, come on let's go and see her.

LADY FITZALAN

Oh for goodness sake you aren't going to show that poor horse off again are you?

LORD FITZALAN

I am indeed.

MATILDA FITZALAN

He might not have the time, perhaps he should come back with his Edwyn.

LORD FITZALAN

Oh nonsense, you have time don't you? I won't make you ride her or anything.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I should think not, it's only a foal.

LORD FITZALAN

Only a foal?

CATHERINE SANTON

Excuse me my Lord, Jane has been telling him. She has her own way of looking at it.

LORD FITZALAN

Well then you must come and have a look at my horse for yourself.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Thank you.
LORD FITZALAN leads WILLIAM FITZHERBERT out of the room. As they leave the room, we see LADY FITZALAN opens the packet with the tapestry in it and shows it to MATILDA FITZALAN and CATHERINE SANTON.

LADY FITZALAN

Men and their horses. Still with all he spent on that, he won't dare say anything about me buying another tapestry.
MATILDA FITZALAN rolls her eyes at CATHERINE SANTON and CATHERINE SANTON smiles.
CUT TO:
EXT. THE STORE. 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 9.45
ARNALD HARBUT walks out of the door and across the street. He walks up to RALF SCURFIELD.

ARNALD HARBUT

It's perfect, that store is loaded with good stuff and there are many others in the town with goods we can get a good price for.

RALF SCURFIELD

I told you this was a good town to hit. All the wool around here, they're thriving.

ARNALD HARBUT

How much will we take?

RALF SCURFIELD

We need to get out of this country, we will have to take everything we can carry.

ARNALD HARBUT

Everything?

RALF SCURFIELD

Yes, everything. Take small things that are worth a lot, there's no point us taking bulky objects. We need to pay for passage out of here and give us enough to set up a new life for ourselves.

ARNALD HARBUT

It's very good of these people to pay for our new life.

RALF SCURFIELD

They're very generous people, it's easy to get a drink out of them.

ARNALD HARBUT

Yes but I have a feeling that the Justice of the Peace will not be so keen to let you accept the town's generosity.

RALF SCURFIELD

I'm sure he won't, if he's here to stop it.

ARNALD HARBUT

I can see by that smile, you have a plan to get rid of him.

RALF SCURFIELD

Don't I always? We don't need to get rid of him permanently though. All we need to do is get him out of the way while we take what we need.

ARNALD HARBUT

How do you propose to do that?

RALF SCURFIELD

If you were the Justice, who is the one person you would be most likely to have to protect the property of?

ARNALD HARBUT

I don't know, the richest person. (thinks for a moment and then realises) The Lord of the Manor.

RALF SCURFIELD

Exactly, if he were to lose something valuable, the Justice would have no choice but to immediately head out to offer his assistance.

ARNALD HARBUT

Leaving the town unprotected.

RALF SCURFIELD

Not completely unprotected. As long as some people are prepared to stand against us there might be some resistance, which is why we have been testing anyone that we have seen or heard of that might cause us a problem.

ARNALD HARBUT

Fortunately there isn't anyone.

RALF SCURFIELD

Lucky for us.

ARNALD HARBUT

The only problem is that if we steal form the manor house, we are sure to get caught.

RALF SCURFIELD

We aren't going to take anything from the manor. If we were going to do that we might as well just steal from there and leave the town alone. All we need to do is take something to cause a distraction.

ARNALD HARBUT

So we need something that the Lord of the Manor will miss but that he doesn't keep in his home?

RALF SCURFIELD

Yes, and I have seen exactly the thing, he is so proud of it he is showing everyone that visits his home. The joy of it is, that we won't even have to carry it, it will walk off with us.
RALF SCURFIELD smiles to himself, we look up the street in the direction that we saw WILLIAM FITZHERBERT travelling.
CUT TO:
EXT. LORD FITZALAN'S STABLE - PADDOCK. 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 10.00
LORD FITZALAN is leading the horse around and there are a few people from the village. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is next to the Stable Hand (HUMPHREY DARNELL)and JANE is next him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That horse will be swift, a good hunter.

JANE SANTON

A knight will be very fast on that horse.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT bends down and picks JANE up so that she can get a better look.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm afraid no knights will ride on that horse. She is like you are: small and very nice. She would need a stronger back to carry the weight of a knight and she would need to bite and kick people.

JANE SANTON

I wouldn't like a horse like that.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I hope you will never have to meet one.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I see you know a bit about horses.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Just a little, things I've picked up from other people.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

You know enough to have met a war horse.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Who hasn't these days.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I'm just a bit surprised that you think a war horse can't be pleasant as well.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is trying to think how to respond.

JANE SANTON

I like the little horse best.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

Aha, you like the foal don't you?

JANE SANTON

Yes, he's funny looking.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

Well he might be now, but one day he will be even better than his mother.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Two fine horses, no wonder he is so proud.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I don't think he realises what he has in the foal. I convinced him to buy the mair and get them to throw in the foal as well.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

How come the seller didn't know how good a horse the foal is?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

He's very young and he limps. When you've been around horses and long as I have you get to know why horses limp, I know I can sort that little chap put right in no time.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and HUMPHREY DARNELL continue to watch LORD FITZALAN showing the horse off. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT puts JANE SANTON back on the floor. JANE SANTON starts playing by herself, fed up with the adults boring conversation.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There are quite a few people here to look at her.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I suppose you have to show it off if you can afford it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I suppose so.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I think pretty much the whole town has been out here to see it?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Have you seen anyone out here you haven't seen around here before?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

One or two. One in particular asked a lot of questions about the horse.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm not surprised, it's a fine horse.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

This fellow was different. He didn't know much about horses, he just wanted to know how she was kept and where.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Did you tell him.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

Of course I did, he seemed like a very pleasant fellow.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What did this man look like?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

He was big, cheerful and interested in the horse, apart from that, I didn't pay much attention to him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Did you notice whether he was wearing a badge or anything?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

Oh yeah, he had a badge, in the shape of a crescent moon.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You seem pretty sure.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I am, in this day and age it pays you to pay attention to the badges people wear. All the strangers that have been up here have had the same badge.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

How many of these strangers have you seen?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

Four of them, though a couple of them have been up here more than once.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Thanks for your time, I'd better get back to town. If I was you I would stay alert: and keep an eye on that horse.
They both look at the horse as it is paraded around the field.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I hope I'm wrong but I think they have shown too keen an interest in this horse.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I don't know why, they don't seem to know enough about horses to be able to use it or look after it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If you are faced with superior forces, create a diversion. When some of the forces are drawn off you can take the main objective.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

You seem to know a lot about battles.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Perhaps too much.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

All right, but I'll do as you say. It won't hurt if you're wrong.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT Turns to say goodbye to JANE SANTON.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Goodbye Jane.

JANE SANTON

Goodbye Uncle Will.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walks off, he turns to wave to JANE SANTON. JANE SANTON waves to him and he continues to walk off. JANE SANTON and HUMPHREY DARNELL turn back to watch the horse.
CUT TO:
INT. THE STORE. 13th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 10.15
PETER SABELLA Is in the store, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT enters. SADDIQ SUAAD comes into the shop from the back.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Ah, I thought a new customer had wandered in.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Sorry to disappoint you.

PETER SABELLA

Did you deliver the Tapestry all right?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes, and it was very well received.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I told her, she would like it.

PETER SABELLA

Of course you did.

SADDIQ SUAAD

We have to make a living. What about you William, what do you have panned for the rest of the day? Are there any tools I can sell you to make it easier?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No I'm afraid not, I'm going to lie low for a few days. I want to keep an eye on things.

SADDIQ SUAAD

What are you waiting for?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Hopefully nothing.

PETER SABELLA

Is there anything we can do to help?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes, there is. Take anything very valuable, you have in your shop and store it somewhere safe.

SADDIQ SUAAD

There is nowhere more safe than the shop, and besides we need it to be here to sell.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Take what you can home with you when you close up for the night, but keep it secret, don't let anyone know.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I'm sure they'll notice if we start taking all the stock home.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Just take small valuables.

PETER SABELLA

You're beginning to make me very concerned.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't mean to, but I think it would wise to be cautious.

PETER SABELLA

This isn't anything to do with that man with the crescent moon badge is it?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I believe it could be, yes.

SADDIQ SUAAD

In that case, there is no need to worry, they've probably gone by now.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Gone? How do you know?

PETER SABELLA

You hear a lot of things in a shop. One of  the things that people have been saying is that the big fellow is leaving.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Sounds to me as though the news has spread pretty fast. A little too fast for normal gossip.

PETER SABELLA

You have a suspicious nature.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walks over to the door, as he opens it to leave, he turns back.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's why I'm still alive.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leaves the store. PETER SABELLA and SADDIQ SUAAD look at each other for a while and then they start to pack some of their small valuables in a pouch.
CUT TO:
EXT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE. 14th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 01.13
Hoofbeats are heard in the distance. They get louder and we see HUMPHREY DARNELL riding in to town at high speed. HUMPHREY DARNELL gets off his horse and races in to the Justice's office.
As the door shuts we swing round to see RALF SCURFIELD and ARNALD HARBUT standing in the shadows.

ARNALD HARBUT

There goes the messenger.

RALF SCURFIELD

Now, just a few moments to let the seriousness, of the situation sink in. (pause, then in a feeble voice) Oh dear the Lord's horse has been stolen and I am just a feeble Justice of the Peace so I will have to leave the town undefended.
We swing back round to the Justice's office to see the door open and MORYS WENLOCK and SIMON ARUNDEL come out, get their horses from the livery stable and ride off.

RALF SCURFIELD

Good, the bait has been taken.  Now let us join the others. Quietly, I don't want these people to think that anything is happening, I wouldn't want to ruin the surprise.
RALF SCURFIELD and ARNALD HARBUT lead their horses by hand along the road, we watch them go past and as they leave the town, they mount up. We turn back to the main road of the town and out from the shadows, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT emerges.
CUT TO:
INT. THE JUSTICES OFFICE. 14th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 01.16
EDWYN MILLER and HUMPHREY DARNELL are talking through the door to the cell. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT enters quietly.

EDWYN MILLER

Come on I can help.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I'm sorry, the Justice told me to stay here, he didn't say anything about letting you out.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That is exactly what you must do, it is the only chance this town has got.
FADE OUT:
ACT THREE
INT. THE JUSTICES OFFICE. 14th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 01.17
EDWYN MILLER is outside the cell and in the Justice's office. He is preparing to leave.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

So you are going to run out on the town just when they need you?

EDWYN MILLER

I would have left by now if it hadn't been for the Justice. He locked me up for no crime whatsoever, just because you asked him to. I think I would be better off in a town that you aren't in control of.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm not in control of this town, I just asked the Justice to do it and he did.

EDWYN MILLER

All right, let's say that you don't control the town, you just have the justice in your pocket.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You know better than that. If he hadn't put you in that cell you would have been taking on those three. I wish you could see that we were doing you a favour.

EDWYN MILLER

Well how about doing me a favour now, and leaving me alone?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Edwyn, please, there will be time enough for hate between us after tonight but I really do need your help.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh really, I knew there had to be a reason why I was let out.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm not expecting you to help me, but it will help Saddiq and Peter, and all the other people with businesses in the town.

EDWYN MILLER

Don't tell me that. I wanted to help, you heard me.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

So now you are saying you will run out on the town just to spite me.

EDWYN MILLER

(pauses as if mulling the situation over) Very well, I'll do it for them. What do you need me to do?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Go with the Stable Hand and get the horse, you'll find the Wenlock and Arundel out there. Keep the horse safe and get it back to the Lord's Stable.

EDWYN MILLER

If that's all you want, why don't you go yourself?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I have a date with an obnoxious man and his friends.

EDWYN MILLER

So you are going to stand up to him at last?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's right.

EDWYN MILLER

Alone?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Only to begin with, but for how long depends on you.

EDWYN MILLER

Aren't you worried I'll just head off and leave you to face them without anyone coming to your aid.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's one thing I'm not at all worried about. You might be angry with me, you might have wanted to run out but you are a man of your word.

EDWYN MILLER

Are you sure?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm betting my life on it.

EDWYN MILLER

(a bit humbled by WILLIAM FITZHERBERT'S trust in him) How many of them are there?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There are four of them.

EDWYN MILLER

How do you know what are they up to?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I've been watching them. There must be one of them with the horse and there are three others. I think that now Wenlock and Arundel are out of town they will be coming back in to take whatever they can before the Justice gets back.

EDWYN MILLER

Why didn't you take him out earlier, you could have saved us all this trouble.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Never take on an enemy until you know the size and disposition of his forces.

EDWYN MILLER

So you just needed me out of the way so that you could find that out?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's it.

EDWYN MILLER

Why didn't you let me in on the plan?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There wasn't time to explain it, and there isn't now. I've left you a horse liveried in the stable. Now please go, the sooner you find the Justice and send him back, the better it will be.

EDWYN MILLER

If they are hiding this horse out there somewhere, how will we know how to find it?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I'll find her.

EDWYN MILLER

All right, let's go.
EDWYN MILLER and the HUMPHREY DARNELL race out of the Justice's office. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT watches them go, then pulls on his gloves as if preparing to fight.
CUT TO:
EXT. THE ROAD TO THE LORDS MANOR. 14th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 01.29
The road is very dark, EDWYN and the HUMPHREY DARNELL are making their way on foot, leading the horses.

EDWYN MILLER

Why aren't we riding?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I don't want my horse to go lame because he trips in a hole on this road.

EDWYN MILLER

We could see where we were going if you'd let me light a torch.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

They'd see us coming.

EDWYN MILLER

Of course they would, but we could move faster and they might panic, then we'd find them.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

Your sure you'd be able to find them?

EDWYN MILLER

We'd cover a lot more ground that's for certain. Anyway, I thought you said you could find them.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I can: I know where the horse is. So you see we don't need to cover ground.
EDWYN MILLER stops and raises his hands.

EDWYN MILLER

What about if we were to want to escape quickly?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

From what?

EDWYN MILLER

I don't know, but I imagine we are about to find out.
MORYS WENLOCK and SIMON ARUNDEL come out from the darkness.

MORYS WENLOCK

How did you get out? (turns to HUMPHREY DARNELL) I thought I told you to guard him, I didn't say anything about letting him go.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

FitzHerbert told me to let him out and come out here to get the horse.

EDWYN MILLER

And to relieve you so that you can get back to protect the town.

MORYS WENLOCK

Protect the town from what?

EDWYN MILLER

From the men with the badges that have lured you out of town by this ruse of stealing a horse.

MORYS WENLOCK

In that case, they know what they are doing because I'm not going back into town until I find that horse.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

She'll be over there in that copse.

MORYS WENLOCK

How can you be sure?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

She won't want to go far and from what William said, the man that took her won't want to take her far anyway. I saw from the  tracks that left the Stable that she came this way. It's too dark to follow the tracks without a torch but that copse is about the only place to hide out.

MORYS WENLOCK

All right then, let's go in quietly.

EDWYN MILLER

You don't need to get the horse, we can take care of anyone in the copse.

MORYS WENLOCK

Are you sure? Do you know how many men there are in there?

EDWYN MILLER

No I don't, but if there are too many I can just watch him until you deal with the threat in the town.

MORYS WENLOCK

Agreed. Very well, until later. (To SIMON ARUNDEL) Come, let us get back into town, I have a feeling we are going to be needed. We still have the element of surprise so we'll use stealth to get in.
MORYS WENLOCK and SIMON ARUNDEL ride off cautiously.
When they see them disappear, the HUMPHREY DARNELL and EDWYN MILLER walk into the copse.
 
They make their way stealthily through the copse until they can see the Horse. It is being guarded by one badgeman (JOHN TEESDALE).
As they get closer to him JOHN TEESDALE notices them. JOHN TEESDALE begins to untie the horse and he picks up a crossbow.
Fearing JOHN TEESDALE is going to shoot the horse, HUMPHREY DARNELL breaks cover and rushes at the him. JOHN TEESDALE shoots, wounding HUMPHREY DARNELL.
EDWYN MILLER races over to HUMPHREY DARNELL while JOHN TEESDALE scares the horse to make it run off. Then he escapes into the night himself.
EDWYN MILLER begins to chase the JOHN TEESDALE and then goes back to HUMPHREY DARNELL.

EDWYN MILLER

Lie still. (gets his napkin out and looks at it) Oh well.
EDWYN MILLER uses his napkin to dress the wound.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

You'd better watch out for that fellow, he could be waiting to get a shot at you.

EDWYN MILLER

He's not interested in us, he'll be on his way back to town now. I should be after him, but I'd better get the horse first.
EDWYN MILLER gets up and begins to leave.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

Wait a moment.
EDWYN MILLER turns back.
CUT TO:
EXT. CHIPPING NORTON MAIN STREET. 14th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 01.37
RALF SCURFIELD, ARNALD HARBUT and a third badgeman (ROLAND MARLY) enter the main street. They walk up it towards the store. At the other end of the Street WILLIAM FITZHERBERT appears and walks towards them.

RALF SCURFIELD

(sneering) What do you want?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Nothing in particular, just out for a walk and thinking.

RALF SCURFIELD

What are you thinking?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I’m thinking that I regret having bought you that drink.

RALF SCURFIELD

Oh, so you have developed a spine after all?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You seem to imply that besting you with a sword will require some sort of bravery.

RALF SCURFIELD

More than you’ve got.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Don’t be silly, if one has the ability to beat someone easily there is no bravery involved.

RALF SCURFIELD

That’s an easy thing to say, the question is, can you back it up?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That’s a fair point, and one that cannot be determined by words.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT draws his sword.
RALF SCURFIELD motions to his men to stay back, he draws his sword and begins swinging it around and making a show of it.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT stands relaxed and waits patiently, he has seen this all before and is not in the slightest bit impressed.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I’m ready anytime you are.
RALF SCURFIELD lunges towards WILLIAM FITZHERBERT. The attack is easily avoided and that set the tone of the whole fight. RALF SCURFIELD with blunt aggression against the skill of WILLIAM FITZHERBERT who is clearly fighting well below his level, but without complacency.
RALF SCURFIELD is disarmed and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT has him with his sword to his throat. We can see a torch coming up to the town as a rider races up on horseback.
Noticing that someone is coming ARNALD HARBUT and ROLAND MARLY decide to make their move on WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.
As WILLIAM FITZHERBERT steps back and prepares to fight the three of them, RALF SCURFIELD gets back to his feet.

RALF SCURFIELD

I much prefer these odds, don't you?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Almost a challenge.

RALF SCURFIELD

Yes well, we'll see.
As they begin to move forward, we can see the torchlight getting closer.
Then out from the darkness steps MORYS WENLOCK and SIMON ARUNDEL. MORYS WENLOCK with his sword and SIMON ARUNDEL with his Bill.

MORYS WENLOCK

I think I liked the odds before.

SIMON ARUNDEL

So did I. I'm just looking forward to the rematch.
The rider with the torch races up, as he comes into view we see that it is HUMPHREY DARNELL.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

My apologies for being late. We had a slight problem with the one guarding the horse.

MORYS WENLOCK

Did you get him?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I'm afraid not, he went off into the night.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Not before wounding you I see.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

It's just a flesh wound but it was enough to slow me down and he got quite a head start on me.

SIMON ARUNDEL

Why didn't Edwyn ride here instead of you?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

As I told him I'm the fastest rider, even with a wounded leg.
Further down the road we see in the shadows the end of a crossbow pointing towards WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

RALF SCURFIELD

So that's all you have: two swordsmen, a billman and an unarmed cripple?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

There's no need to concern yourself, there are more than enough of us to deal with your sorry band.
Further down the road we see in the shadows the end of a crossbow pointing towards WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

MORYS WENLOCK

You can save yourself a lot of trouble by putting your swords aside.
RALF SCURFIELD starts to lower his sword and gestures to his men to do the same.
As they almost reach the floor and look as though they are about to give themselves up. RALF SCURFIELD looks back down the street towards the point we have seen the crossbow. He gives a signal and shouts...

RALF SCURFIELD

Now!
We swing round to see the spot where the shot will come from. There is a tense pause and then the crossbow is thrown out on the street.
RALF SCURFIELD and the other BADGEMEN are surprised.
JOHN TEESDALE comes out at sword point. EDWYN MILLER is holding the sword.
As EDWYN MILLER marches up to them with JOHN TEESDALE at sword point, the other BADGEMEN realise that all is lost and give themselves up.
MORYS WENLOCK and SIMON ARUNDEL take the BADGEMEN in to the cell. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT goes over to the HUMPHREY DARNELL.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I can't say it wasn't a pleasant surprise, but you lied.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

How dare you?

EDWYN MILLER

I can't believe you're upset about that now.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm not upset, I'm just making an observation.

HUMPHREY DARNELL

An unfair one. I didn't lie to anyone. I am the fastest rider, I got here first.

EDWYN MILLER

Yes, well you were carrying the torch. (to WILLIAM FITZHERBERT) He would have got here first anyway, he is pretty fast.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

So you snook in quietly. Having him ride up here was just a diversion.

EDWYN MILLER

That's right.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well, I'm impressed. More importantly, I'm alive so I'm very grateful.

EDWYN MILLER

Good, you can show your appreciation by getting the first round in at the tavern.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You'll be lucky, all I want tonight is a good sleep.

EDWYN MILLER

Me too, but I can wait until tomorrow.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

So you'll be staying at least one more day then?

HUMPHREY DARNELL

I'm very sorry to break in on this moment between you two, but you'll note the red patch on my leg. It comes with a certain amount of pain.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh yes, sorry. Let's get down to the Surgeon. I'm sure he won't mind us getting him out of bed in the middle of the night.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He should be getting used to it by now, we're bringing him custom again.
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT lead HUMPHREY DARNELL on his horse down the street. We watch them go, then...
CUT TO:
EXT. CHIPPING NORTON MAIN STREET. 14th SEPTEMBER 1485 – 02.02
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leave the Surgeons, they walk down the road in silence. Now that they are alone, they both feel a bit awkward.

EDWYN MILLER

It seems I may have been a bit hasty.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You tell it as you see it, that's what makes you a good squire.

EDWYN MILLER

I do my best but its hard to be as level headed as you are at times. 

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Level headed? Did you see the size of that man?

EDWYN MILLER

Not as big as Cheney.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's true.
They walk on for a while, then..

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You took a bit of a risk leaving that horse out there unguarded. I'd be happy to come and help you take it back to the stables.

EDWYN MILLER

It should be back there by now but your welcome to come with me while I check.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Who took it?

EDWYN MILLER

She has a foal. According to the Humphrey she will find her way back to him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I hope he's right.

EDWYN MILLER

So do I, otherwise we could be wandering about all night.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You should have told me about your plan.
 

EDWYN MILLER

There wasn't time.
FADE OUT:
END SHOW


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