Knight of the Stone King - Lost Souls and Redemption

Reads: 89  | Likes: 0  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Historical Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


Episode 6 of 6 - TV series set in Mediaeval Chipping Norton

Submitted: June 24, 2018

A A A | A A A

Submitted: June 24, 2018

A A A

A A A


KNIGHT OF THE STONE KING

Episode 6

“LOST SOULS AND REDEMPTION”

TEASER
FADE IN:
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER are sitting in the tavern drinking. There is someone singing and the atmosphere is happy. A man (STEPHEN ADDISON) walks in to the tavern and looks around. He sees WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER, and they look up and see him. HARRY WENTWORTH is about to go over and ask what STEPHEN ADDISON wants to drink but the STEPHEN ADDISON just smiles and leaves the tavern. HARRY WENTWORTH just raises his eyebrows and then goes back to serving others.
EDWYN MILLER leans over to WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

EDWYN MILLER

Was that who I think it was?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I think so. (pause) If it is, we'll find out soon enough. Having found us, he won't leave easily.
FADE OUT:
ACT 1
EXT.CHIPPING NORTON. MAIN STREET 12TH OCTOBER 1485. 11.13
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT are walking down the street.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(quietly to EDWYN MILLER) Don't turn around and look, but I think we are being followed.

EDWYN MILLER

(quietly) Yes I've noticed it too. He's been on our tail for some time. What do you think he wants?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(quietly) Let's find out, take the next turn.
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turn down a side street and immediately run and hide behind some barrels.
CUT TO:
EXT.CHIPPING NORTON. MAIN STREET 12TH OCTOBER 1485. 11.13
We look down the street from the point of view of the person following EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT. We go into the gap between the two buildings and then we see EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leap out from behind the barrels.
CUT TO:
EXT.CHIPPING NORTON. MAIN STREET 12TH OCTOBER 1485. 11.13
A young boy (ROBERT PAXTON) is standing in front of EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT he looks very worried.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well it looks like we've caught our shadow.

EDWYN MILLER

Yes, what shall we do with him, take him to the Justice?
ROBERT PAXTON still looks worried but he doesn't run, though he seems to want to. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT goes over to ROBERT PAXTON and bends at his knees so that he is the same height as ROBERT PAXTON.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Don't look so worried.

ROBERT PAXTON

I heard you help people.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We try to, but we like to know why people are following us.

ROBERT PAXTON

I want you to teach me to fight like you do.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It takes a great many years and it's not easy. Why would you want to?

ROBERT PAXTON

The other boys pick on me and I would like to pay them back.

EDWYN MILLER

You should ask the Harry Wentworth how to fight.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Edwyn, you're not helping.

ROBERT PAXTON

I did but he told me to go away.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Fighting is not always the best way.

ROBERT PAXTON

Then will you pay them back for me?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

How can I say yes to that? I don't know them, so I only have your word that they deserve it. Even if I did pay them back for you, what would you do when I'm not around.
ROBERT PAXTON looks very disappointed, and is on the verge of tears but is putting a brave face on it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'll tell you what we'll do. We'll come and speak to your parents. Where do you live?

ROBERT PAXTON

In the little shack by the south copse.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

All right, you run along home and we'll find a way to help sort this out.
ROBERT PAXTON runs off.

STEPHEN ADDISON (OC)

So you now fight for little children?
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turn around to see STEPHEN ADDISON standing in front of them.

EDWYN MILLER

We fight for who we choose to.

STEPHEN ADDISON

You let your squire speak for you now then?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Edwyn speaks for himself. Though I cannot fault his words, nor can I find any better ones for myself.

STEPHEN ADDISON

Well he is a little too old for a squire anyway.

EDWYN MILLER

Not too old to close a smart mouth.

STEPHEN ADDISON

(steps up ready to fight) I do not take such insolence from a squire.
EDWYN MILLER steps forward and readies himself to fight, but before either of them can strike a blow, WILLIAM FITZHERBERT steps between them, he faces EDWYN MILLER.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Step back; don’t let him provoke you.

EDWYN MILLER

But..

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We don’t want the Justice taking too much of an interest in this affair.
EDWYN MILLER grits his teeth and nods as he turns away.

STEPHEN ADDISON

A very wise choice you have taught your squire well.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT reels round and stands right in STEPHEN ADDISON’S face.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(sternly) You should learn to control your mouth for the sake of your health. I have no squire, I have a friend. A friend who could dispatch you from this world to whatever reward you have earned in this life, and while he stood above your lifeless body he would not even be breathing heavily.
STEPHEN ADDISON sees a look in WILLIAM FITZHERBERT’S face that chills his heart.

STEPHEN ADDISON

Very well we will speak again.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Just make sure your manner has improved when we do.
STEPHEN ADDISON walks off with a mock bow.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT turns back to EDWYN MILLER and they start walking off together.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Thank you, I know it isn’t easy controlling your temper in a situation like that.

EDWYN MILLER

I never did like him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He’s not so bad, just a bit insensitive.

EDWYN MILLER

Do you think he’s here to ask us back?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Could well be, he is certainly up to something.

EDWYN MILLER

Are you ever tempted to go back to the life we used to have?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Every day.

EDWYN MILLER

Me too.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well, we’ll probably never get the chance now.

EDWYN MILLER

I suppose not, sorry.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Apology from you is neither sought nor necessary.

EDWYN MILLER

But thanks are; if you hadn’t bluffed him like that I would have had to fight him for the sake of my pride.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT stops and turns toward EDWYN MILLER.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I was not bluffing, I meant every word that I said.
EDWYN MILLER looks at WILLIAM FITZHERBERT who now has the look of a proud father, he puts his hand on EDWYN MILLER’S shoulder. EDWYN MILLER smiles and they walk off. As they go...

EDWYN MILLER

I suppose I am getting a bit too old to be a squire.
The two of them laugh as they walk away.
CUT TO:
EXT. STORE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.16
The door opens and ROBERT PAXTON comes flying out followed by SADDIQ SUAAD but ROBERT PAXTON races and ducks between two structures and gets away. SADDIQ SUAAD comes back fuming. As he comes walking back to the shop, EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walk up.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What was that all about?

SADDIQ SUAAD

It was that little urchin, he made off with a loaf of bread. How he got in without me noticing I don't know.

EDWYN MILLER

He must be good, I've never known so much as a light breeze get in through that door without you racing to sell it something.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I know, but that little toad is amazingly quick and quiet.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Who was it?

SADDIQ SUAAD

A little lad from down by the south copse.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

His name's Robert, we were just talking to him. He wanted our help to stop the other kids picking on him.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I wish you would.

EDWYN MILLER

We're going down to see his parents.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Good luck, I don't think he's got any. At least none I've ever seen around here. I just see the kid, though he's never been in the shop before.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

This is the first time he's stolen from you?

SADDIQ SUAAD

Yes. It's only a loaf of bread now but who knows where it will lead. I'll tell the Justice when I see him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Can you give me till the end of the day, if Robert returns with the money for will you forget about it.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I can't say that, but Peter will be able to balance the books and that's what counts in business. So I would say no more about it, unless it happens again of course.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

All right then we'll be back later to see whether you got your payment.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Allah smile on your venture.

EDWYN MILLER

And fill your store with customers.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Indeed.
SADDIQ SUAAD grins and goes back into the shop. EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT make their way out of the town towards the South Copse.
CUT TO:
EXT. JEREMIAH PAXTON'S HUT DOWN BY THE SOUTH COPSE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.21
ROBERT PAXTON comes running down the hill with a loaf of bread. He rushes over to the door and pushes it open.
CUT TO:
INT. JEREMIAH PAXTON'S HUT. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.21
ROBERT PAXTON enters with the loaf of bread, he races over to the bed where his father (JEREMIAH PAXTON) is sleeping. ROBERT PAXTON goes over and wakes him.

ROBERT PAXTON

Dad, Dad, wake up dad.
His father mumbles and gradually wakens, he's disorientated at first and then he realises.

ROBERT PAXTON

Here Dad, eat this.
JERMIAH PAXTON looks at the loaf of bread that ROBERT PAXTON is offering him.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Bread?

ROBERT PAXTON

Yes, (breaking a bit off) here.
ROBERT PAXTON offers a lump to JEREMIAH PAXTON, who hesitates but hunger gets the better of him and he takes it and eats it quickly.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I hope you got this by honest means son?

ROBERT PAXTON

Of course I did Dad, now eat up.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

You're a good boy son, you're mother would have been so proud.
JEREMIAH PAXTON starts crying gently.

ROBERT PAXTON

You just rest there a bit Dad, you'll be better soon.
JEREMIAH PAXTON rocks gently backwards and forwards with the bread. He eats it more slowly now. ROBERT PAXTON gets up and makes his way slowly towards the door, tears in his eyes. ROBERT PAXTON looks back as if hoping his father will ask where he is going but JEREMIAH PAXTON just sits there with a far off look in his eye. We focus on JEREMIAH PAXTON who does not alter his expression even as we hear the door open and close.
CUT TO:
EXT. JEREMIAH PAXTON'S HUT. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.23
ROBERT PAXTON leans back against the closed door and then wipes the tears from his face. He picks up a pale just outside the door and walks off in the direction away from Chipping Norton. We follow him as he walks down the track away from the hut. As he passes a dense bit of scrub we see that a group of four boys, who are around 14 hiding behind the bush. They are grinning at each other and their leader (ROGER WALSH) pointing at ROBERT PAXTON, then they start to follow him.
We travel back up to the hut and we see that WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER are just coming down the road towards the hut. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT goes up and knocks on the door. There is no reply.

EDWYN MILLER

Is it abandoned?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I don't think so, but maybe there is no-one at home.
EDWYN MILLER starts peering in through the shutters on the windows.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What are you doing?

EDWYN MILLER

Trying to see whether anyone is at home.
EDWYN MILLER tries one of the shutters and finds it a bit loose. He tries to open it a bit.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's enough.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh for goodness sake how else are we going to find out what's happening?
EDWYN MILLER has a good look in.

EDWYN MILLER

I think I can see someone in there but they're just sitting there.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Why don't they answer the door?

EDWYN MILLER

Perhaps they don't like to because they don't know who we are.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT nods in agreement and then goes back over to the door.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(knocks on the door) Hello. (knocks again) Hello, we're friends of Robert. We understand he lives here. (pauses and listens) Can we come in?
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT pause to listen but they hear nothing.

EDWYN MILLER

I think we should just go in.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We can't just go in without being invited.

EDWYN MILLER

No I suppose not. I'll check around a bit and see if there is anyone or anything around.
EDWYN MILLER looks around a bit then he wanders around the side of the hut. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT knocks again and watches EDWYN MILLER go. He then looks again at the hut door and he knocks again.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We're friends of Robert. You don't have to open the door but if you could at least speak to us we'll be very grateful.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT continues to listen. He hears footsteps inside the hut and he stands back expectantly when he hears the door latch.
The door opens and EDWYN MILLER is standing there.

EDWYN MILLER

Surprise!

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What the hell are you doing in there?

EDWYN MILLER

Oh don't get all high and mighty, I think this man needs our help.
EDWYN MILLER stands back and we see JEREMIAH PAXTON sitting where he was before with his bread in his hand. He is looking at EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and holding his bread in a very protective way.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER go in and close the door behind them.
CUT TO:
INT. JEREMIAH PAXTON'S HUT. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.27
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walks over to JEREMIAH PAXTON and kneels down. While they are talking, EDWYN MILLER wanders around the room straightening things up a bit.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm sorry to have come into your house like this but we don't mean you any harm.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

(Clutching his bread closer to him) It's mine, my son got it for me.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We haven't come to take your bread, or anything else. We just wanted to talk to you about Robert.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

What's he done now? Please don't punish him too severely, he's a good boy really.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm not here to punish him, I just came to talk to you about him. He says he is being picked on by the other children.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I knew there was something, but he wouldn't tell me.
EDWYN MILLER has stopped straightening things and is looking at JEREMIAH PAXTON with an annoyed look on his face.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He asked us for help.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I wish you would, it's not easy for him.

EDWYN MILLER

It would be a lot easier for him if you tried helping him a bit.
EDWYN MILLER storms over to the door. JEREMIAH PAXTON takes a nervous bite of his bread.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Edwyn!

EDWYN MILLER

I'm going out to get some fresh air, the stench of self pity in here is suffocating me.
EDWYN MILLER goes outside and slams the door behind him.
It's as if the outburst has stirred something in JEREMIAH PAXTON and he is beginning to grope his way out of an abyss.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'm sorry about my friend's behaviour.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

No, no its all right, he's right. I have failed my son.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You haven't failed him.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

You don't look like a man who usually lies. Yet you have seen me and this godforsaken hut. Of course I've failed him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Very well. You are failing him, he needs you. He is not lost yet, though he could soon be so unless you help him.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Me help him? What can I do to help him?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Nothing lying there. (Gets up and goes over to the door) We'll do what we can to help your son but it wouldn't hurt you to wash, and tidy this place up a bit.
JEREMIAH PAXTON looks around the place as if seeing it for the first time in years. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT opens the door and goes out.
CUT TO:
EXT. JEREMIAH PAXTON'S HUT. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.30
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walks away from the door and looks around but he can't see EDWYN MILLER around. He looks around both sides of the hut and then shrugs his shoulders and walks back towards the town.
CUT TO:
EXT. DOWN BY THE SPRING. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.30
We can see the bucket on the ground near the spring and we can hear children's voices taunting ROBERT PAXTON. We move to where the noise is coming from and we see that ROBERT PAXTON is being held by two of the boys while the other two throw mud at him and laugh.
Suddenly the two boys throwing the mud are dragged back and we see the look of surprise on the other two. They let ROBERT PAXTON go and he falls to the ground.
We turn around to see that standing before them is STEPHEN ADDISON, he draws his sword and stands with it help aloft in a threatening manner.
The children run for the town as fast as they can.
STEPHEN ADDISON walks over to ROBERT PAXTON.

STEPHEN ADDISON

Come on boy up you get.
ROBERT PAXTON gets to his feet.

ROBERT PAXTON

What do you want? I haven't got anyhting.

STEPHEN ADDISON

I want you to tell William Fitzherbert something for me.

ROBERT PAXTON

Why not tell him yourself?

STEPHEN ADDISON

I think he is more likely to listen to you.

ROBERT PAXTON

What do you want me to say?

STEPHEN ADDISON

Ask him to meet me at the crossroads on the road to Banbury at dusk.

ROBERT PAXTON

He'll be there, he beat Chough, he's not afraid of anyone.

STEPHEN ADDISON

(laughs) He has no need to be afraid of me. I am not his enemy any more than I am your enemy. Here, (takes out a coin) this is for you; to show that I wish you no harm. You can have this as payment for doing this job for me.
STEPHEN ADDISON hands ROBERT PAXTON the coin. By his reaction we can assume that ROBERT PAXTON has never had so much money.

ROBERT PAXTON

Thank you sir, thank you very much.
ROBERT PAXTON runs back over to the pale and fills it with water from the stream.

STEPHEN ADDISON

(to himself) Yes he'll meet me there and when he hears what I have to offer him he won't be coming back to your town again.
STEPHEN ADDISON walks off, smiling.
FADE OUT:
 
ACT TWO
EXT. ROAD TO CHIPPING NORTON FROM THE SOUTH COPSE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.34.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is walking back towards town, as he is passing a thick bit of vegetation. Suddenly a figure, covered in leaves for camouflage leaps out at him. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT dodges the attack easily. The attacker flies past loses his footing and falls down a slope.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What are you doing?
We look down the short slope and at the bottom is EDWYN MILLER in amongst a clump of nettles.

EDWYN MILLER

Getting up as quickly as I can.
EDWYN MILLER gets up, rubs himself and clambers back up the slope.

EDWYN MILLER

Weren't you even a bit surprised?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Come on, Somerset tried that one on us, creeping up behind a hedge.
EDWYN MILLER is still rubbing himself.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Are you all right?

EDWYN MILLER

My pride is hurt, I look like a mad tree and I landed in a clump of stinging nettles but other than that I'm fine.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well, I won't tell anyone if you don't. But you'd better get rid of all those leaves and stuff before we get to town.
The two of them continue walking down the road as EDWYN MILLER removes the camouflage from himself and intermittently rubs where he has been stung.
CUT TO:
EXT. JEREMIAH PAXTON'S HUT. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.36
ROBERT PAXTON comes up to the hut with the pale in his hand. He walks up to the front of the hut and places it down next to the door quietly, trying not to disturb his father. He walks off in the direction of town.
As he gets farther away we hear shuffling from inside the hut and then we see one of the shutters open. ROBERT PAXTON is now too far off to hear so he does not see that his father has come to the window to see him go. JEREMIAH PAXTON goes from the window and we see the door open. Now we see for the first time that JEREMIAH PAXTON has only one leg. He picks up the pale with difficulty and makes his way back into the hut.
CUT TO:
INT. ELEANOUR READE'S HOUSE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.45
ELEANOUR READE is crushing some leaves. There is a knock on the door.

ELEANOUR READE

You'll have to let yourself in my hands are a bit of a mess at the moment.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER enter.

ELEANOUR READE

William, Edwyn. Good to see you.
ELEANOUR READE goes over to hug them but she keeps her hands away from their clothes.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Steady on, you'd think we haven't been out here for weeks.

ELEANOUR READE

I can't help it you've done so much for the town since you've been here.

EDWYN MILLER

Particularly saving Wenlock.
ELEANOUR READE blushes. EDWYN MILLER scratches himself again.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

This isn't just a social call, Edwyn seems to have some sort of allergic reaction and I thought you might have something for it.

ELEANOUR READE

Oh dear, let me have a look.
EDWYN MILLER backs away.

ELEANOUR READE

Oh come on don't be shy. I won't see anything here I haven't seen in the bath house.
EDWYN MILLER reluctantly pulls up his shirt to show her some of the nettle stings.

ELEANOUR READE

You've got a bad case of nettle sting there.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Is there anything you can do to stop him fidgeting?

ELEANOUR READE

Yes, no problem.
ELEANOUR READE washes her hands and then gets some doc leaves which she chops and mixes with a cream.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Whatever you gave to Jeffrey has done him a power of good. He's full of energy these days.

ELEANOUR READE

I don't think that's all down to me. I gave him a bit of a tonic, but you gave him his land back.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He hadn't ever lost it.

ELEANOUR READE

He had in his heart, the world can seem very heavy you when you think you have lost everything.
ELEANOUR READE hands the cream to EDWYN MILLER.

ELEANOUR READE

Here you are, just rub this on it and it'll begin to feel better straight away.
EDWYN MILLER takes it and just stands with it.

ELEANOUR READE

Well go on then, the sooner you put it on, the sooner it will stop itching.

EDWYN MILLER

I thought I'd do it when I get home.

ELEANOUR READE

Oh no you don't, besides I've only given you the external treatment I have to brew up the internal medicine.

EDWYN MILLER

Oh, right then.
EDWYN MILLER is still hesitant.

ELEANOUR READE

You can go behind the curtain there if you'd feel more comfortable.
EDWYN MILLER goes behind the curtain that separated the main room from her sleeping area. ELEANOUR READE starts brewing up the medicine.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

The tonic you gave to Jeffrey; would it work on all types of melancholy?

ELEANOUR READE

Why are you feeling a bit down?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No, it's not me, it's someone I know.

ELEANOUR READE

You wouldn't believe how many people know someone who needs my help.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You might know this person as well. He lives down in the old run down hut by the South Copse.

ELEANOUR READE

You must mean Jeremiah.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes, that's right. You know him then?

ELEANOUR READE

I know him but I haven't seen him for a very long time. Not since his wife died.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well I can certainly understand that.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT bows his head and looks at the floor. There is a moments silence and he looks back up at ELEANOUR READE.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He has slipped into a melancholy and we need to help in out of it.

ELEANOUR READE

Yes of course, but he's been around for a long time, nobody has ever taken an interest before.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Perhaps we should all try to look a bit harder for these things. I only found out because his son asked me for help.

ELEANOUR READE

Little Robert? He hangs around here sometimes. He collects some herbs for me, I give him a few things in return.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's all he does?

ELEANOUR READE

I think he does anything he can to survive.
EDWYN MILLER comes back from behind the curtain.

EDWYN MILLER

He's taken to stealing now.

ELEANOUR READE

How is the ointment?

EDWYN MILLER

Feels a lot better, thanks.

ELEANOUR READE

Things must have got a lot more desperate for those two; Robert has never stolen anything before. At least not to my certain knowledge.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Things did look pretty desperate when we went over there.

ELEANOUR READE

I'd better find out for myself. I've got one or two tonics that might be right but it's best if I see what this melancholy is like first hand.
EDWYN MILLER goes over to where ELEANOUR READE is brewing.

ELEANOUR READE

It doesn't smell too good but it'll stop your skin from irritating.

EDWYN MILLER

If I can keep it down.

ELEANOUR READE

We'll soon find out.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If only it were as easy to solve Robert's problems.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT looks down and fiddles with is sword as we..
CUT TO:
EXT. STORE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.51
ROBERT PAXTON is hiding across the road. He sees someone come out and then he looks around to see if anyone is coming. When he sees that the coast is clear he dashes across the road and into the store.
CUT TO:
INT. STORE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.51
ROBERT PAXTON rushes in and over to the counter. PETER SABELLA comes out from the back and SADDIQ SUAAD follows him and quietly goes around behind ROBERT PAXTON to cut off his escape. SADDIQ SUAAD stands in the doorway.

SADDIQ SUAAD

So, did you think we wouldn't recognise you? What were you trying to get away with this time?

ROBERT PAXTON

I just came to say sorry for stealing the bread, and to pay for it.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Why didn't you pay for it before?

ROBERT PAXTON

I couldn't, but now I can so I came to pay you. (holds out the coin) Here.

PETER SABELLA

Where did you get hold of this much money all of a sudden?

ROBERT PAXTON

A man gave it to me.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Where is this man, if only he would give us all money like that? What is his name?

ROBERT PAXTON

I don't know.

PETER SABELLA

Where does he live?

ROBERT PAXTON

I don't know.
SADDIQ SUAAD comes up behind him and grabs him gently but firmly.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I think we had better let the Justice have a word with you.

ROBERT PAXTON

But I'm going to pay.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Yes but where did you get the money?

ROBERT PAXTON

I told you.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Come on. (turns to PETER SABELLA) A stranger gave him money.
SADDIQ SUAAD ushers ROBERT PAXTON out of the door.
CUT TO:
EXT. STORE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.52
SADDIQ SUAAD escorts ROBERT PAXTON down the street and into the Justice’s office.
CUT TO:
INT. JUSTICE’S OFFICE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.52
MORYS WENLOCK is sitting at his desk, looking over some papers.
SADDIQ SUAAD brings ROBERT PAXTON up to the desk.

MORYS WENLOCK

Hello, I see the bread thief has been apprehended.
Both SADDIQ SUAAD and ROBERT PAXTON stand silently, obviously both feeling nervous. ROBERT PAXTON’S attention is on MORYS WENLOCK whereas SADDIQ SUAAD keeps looking at the cell.

MORYS WENLOCK

(noticing SADDIQ SUAAD’S nervousness, and addressing him) I don’t suppose you want to hang around in here for very long. Your last stay was not too comfortable.

SADDIQ SUAAD

I would rather have a shop full of moneyless people.

MORYS WENLOCK

Well that’s all right you can leave this in my hands now.

ROBERT PAXTON

I was going to pay for the bread with this.
ROBERT PAXTON holds out the coin and shows it to the Justice.

SADDIQ SUAAD

Yes but where did he get it?

MORYS WENLOCK

That is what I am going to find out.
SADDIQ SUAAD hesitates to leave.

MORYS WENLOCK

It’s all right, Robert won’t try to run away from the justice will you?

ROBERT PAXTON

No.

MORYS WENLOCK

That would be very foolish wouldn’t it?

ROBERT PAXTON

Yes.

MORYS WENLOCK

So would lying to me wouldn’t it?

ROBERT PAXTON

Yes.

MORYS WENLOCK

Good, you can leave this with me.
SADDIQ SUAAD nods and leaves the office.

MORYS WENLOCK

So let's start at the beginning; you stole a loaf of bread?

ROBERT PAXTON

Yes, my Dad needed it.

MORYS WENLOCK

Well, we can't just take things because we need them. If we did, the store would not be able to stay open and nobody would have anything.

ROBERT PAXTON

I know, that's what my Dad always said, but I can pay the store for the bread now. I went in there to pay them.

MORYS WENLOCK

Yes you did, and that was a very brave thing to do. We just want to know where you suddenly got the money from.

ROBERT PAXTON

I told you, a man gave it to me.

MORYS WENLOCK

Are you sure he gave it to you? You didn't just take it from him did you.

ROBERT PAXTON

He gave it to me.

MORYS WENLOCK

Why did he give it to you?

ROBERT PAXTON

He gave it to me because he wanted me to give a message to FitzHerbert.

MORYS WENLOCK

And have you given him the message?

ROBERT PAXTON

Not yet I haven't seen him.

MORYS WENLOCK

I see. Well I'll tell you what I'm going to do. Give me the coin.
ROBERT PAXTON is reluctant.

MORYS WENLOCK

Come on, if what you say is true you will get it back.
ROBERT PAXTON hands over the coin.

MORYS WENLOCK

Now this coin is yours when you have delivered the message. Until then you have no money to pay for the bread you stole and so you are in my custody.

ROBERT PAXTON

But I have to give a message to FitzHerbert.

MORYS WENLOCK

Don't you worry about that I'll tell him you're here and he can come and see you. Now you make yourself comfortable. It'll be lunchtime soon.

ROBERT PAXTON

Do I have to go in the cell?

MORYS WENLOCK

Not if you promise to stay put here until we've spoken to Fitzherbert.

ROBERT PAXTON

I promise.

MORYS WENLOCK

Good.
ROBERT PAXTON and MORYS WENLOCK sit down. MORYS WENLOCK looks out of the window and notices something. He goes over to the door, opens it and beckons someone over to the office.
MORYS WENLOCK then comes back in followed by JENLYNS THOMAS.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Yes what is it?

MORYS WENLOCK

Have you seen Fitzherbert?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Yes just a few minutes ago, with Edwyn. They looked as though they were heading up to the Manor.

MORYS WENLOCK

Right; I'm going to have a little chat with them. You'll have to keep an eye on the office for a while.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Of course, but who is this guest we have here?

MORYS WENLOCK

This is Robert, he is helping me. He must stay here until I get back. Give him a decent meal and try to keep occupied.
MORYS WENLOCK gives the coin to JENLYNS THOMAS.

MORYS WENLOCK

Keep this safe. If Robert gives a message to FitzHerbert, give this coin to Robert.

JENLYNS THOMAS

(surprised at the value of the coin) No problem.
EDWYN MILLER leaves the office. JENLYNS THOMAS looks at ROBERT PAXTON and gets out a board game.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Well then young Robert, how would you like to play a few games of Nine Men’s Morris?

ROBERT PAXTON

I don't know how.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Well then let me begin your education.
JENLYNS THOMAS starts to set out the counters and we..
CUT TO:
INT. MANOR KITCHEN. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 11.58
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER are sitting at the Kitchen table. CATHERINE SANTON puts a mug of drink down in front of each of them and sits down with one of her own.
EDWYN MILLER just stares in to his.

CATHERINE SANTON

Cheer up lad, she's only gone for a few days, she'll be back.
EDWYN MILLER manages a half-hearted smile.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Ah let him suffer, I used to suffer like that when Katherine and I were apart.

CATHERINE SANTON

Well I must say, a fine cheerful pair you are. Did you come here just to get me down?
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT smiles.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Not exactly, there is someone who needs our help.

CATHERINE SANTON

What can I do?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We've been down to see Jeremiah and Robert, do you know them?

CATHERINE SANTON

No, I can't say I do. I might know them if I saw them, but I don't recognise the name.

EDWYN MILLER

Robert's a young boy, Jeremiah is his father. He seems to be bed ridden.

CATHERINE SANTON

Oh I think I know the man you mean, he's got a leg missing.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I didn't notice.

CATHERINE SANTON

You didn't notice?

EDWYN MILLER

He was in the bed all the time we were there, he had the bed clothes over his legs.

CATHERINE SANTON

Well, it might not have been him, but whether it is or not, what can I do.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

They seem pretty desperate for food at the moment. I was wondering if you could pass some spare food to them if it was likely to go to waste.

CATHERINE SANTON

We give our food out in alms anyway so I'm sure we can stretch to one more. Why doesn't Jeremiah claim it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He seemed to be well passed it.

CATHERINE SANTON

Well I'll see what I can do, where should I leave it?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I'll ask Robert to come up here to check with you and see whether you have anything for him.

CATHERINE SANTON

Yes, I might even have the odd errand he can run in exchange.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That'll be good, now all I have to do is find a way of solving his other problem.
Just then, there is a knock on the door.

CATHERINE SANTON

Come in.
MORYS WENLOCK enters.

MORYS WENLOCK

Whose problem are we talking about?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Robert's.

MORYS WENLOCK

Ah well his problems could be over or they could just be beginning. (pauses and looks to CATHERINE SANTON) Sorry to burst in and talk business.

CATHERINE SANTON

Don't worry, you are always welcome here. You went through a lot because of Jane.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Where is she?

CATHERINE SANTON

Oh, she's down with her favourite horse and groom of course.

EDWYN MILLER

What did you mean by his problems could be just beginning?

MORYS WENLOCK

He’s in my custody at the moment. He went into the store this morning to pay off his debt.

CATHERINE SANTON

That sounds like something we should be commending him for rather than keeping him locked up.

MORYS WENLOCK

He’s not exactly locked up, he’s with Thomas back at the Office. We’re just a bit concerned as to where he got the money.

EDWYN MILLER

Perhaps he found some.

MORYS WENLOCK

Could be, but it isn’t the amount usually left lying around. In any case, he said he was given the money by a man who wanted him to deliver a message.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

What message?

MORYS WENLOCK

I don’t know, he has to give it to you, is all he says.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes, and I think I know who it will be from. I’d better go and find out.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT gets up and finishes his drink. EDWYN MILLER starts to drink up as well but WILLIAM FITZHERBERT stays his drinking hand.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You stay and finish your drink, I think I can handle this one alone. (to CATHERINE SANTON) My Lady. (to MORYS WENLOCK and EDWYN MILLER) Gentlemen.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leaves.

MORYS WENLOCK

Did he call you “My Lady?”

CATHERINE SANTON

Yes he does that; I don’t know whether he’s joking or what.

EDWYN MILLER

He’s not joking.

MORYS WENLOCK

He’s a strange one all right.

EDWYN MILLER / CATHERINE SANTON

Yep.

MORYS WENLOCK

I don’t know that much about him, in fact (nods at EDWYN MILLER) either of you.

EDWYN MILLER

Enough to know you can trust us I hope.

MORYS WENLOCK

Oh yeh, I know that. It’s just that when he goes off like that, I have a nagging feeling that he won’t be coming back.

EDWYN MILLER

On any other day you would be right, but today could be a very different day.
MORYS WENLOCK and CATHERINE SANTON put down their drinks and look at EDWYN MILLER with concerned look on their faces.
FADE OUT:
 
ACT THREE
INT. JUSTICE'S OFFICE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 12.15
ROBERT PAXTON and JENLYNS THOMAS are playing Nine Men's Morris. There are empty food bowls next to them. JENLYNS THOMAS gives a sly and knowing look to ROBERT PAXTON. He then moves one of the counters. ROBERT PAXTON then moves one to win the game.

ROBERT PAXTON

I win again.
ROBERT PAXTON puts his hands in the air, JENLYNS THOMAS holds his head in his hands. The door opens and in comes WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

JENLYNS THOMAS

(looking up) Oh thank heaven. You can play this little tyrant. He's too good for me.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Perhaps later, we have something to discuss don't we Robert?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Well then I had better get out of the way and let you get down to it.
JENLYNS THOMAS stands up and packs away the game and food bowls as WILLIAM FITZHERBERT takes his seat at the table opposite ROBERT PAXTON.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well then, I understand you have a message for me?

ROBERT PAXTON

I do. A man with a sword told me to ask you to meet him at the crossroads on the road to Banbury at dusk.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Did he say anything else?

ROBERT PAXTON

No, but I told him you weren't afraid of him.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(laughs) That's right I'm not afraid of him.

ROBERT PAXTON

He said he wasn't your enemy.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He never has been before.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Do you know who it is?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Indeed I do.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Could he have given a major coin for such a task.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

It's his way, he likes to show his wealth.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Does he have a name, this mysterious benefactor?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Indeed he does, but please don't ask that I should give it. I would have to refuse to say or I would have to lie. Neither action appeals to me.

ROBERT PAXTON

I wasn't lying. The coin is mine.

JENLYNS THOMAS

Indeed it is.
JENLYNS THOMAS gives the coin to ROBERT PAXTON

ROBERT PAXTON

Can I go now?

JENLYNS THOMAS

I should think so. It seems you were telling the truth.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Robert, thank you.
ROBERT PAXTON grins and goes out through the door.
JENLYNS THOMAS goes over to look out of the window.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Where’s he going?

JENLYNS THOMAS

Back to the store by the looks of it.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I’d better go over there and see what happens then, Saddiq didn’t believe him last time.

JENLYNS THOMAS

That’s a good idea. I’d better stay put here until Wenlock gets back.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT nods and leaves the room.
CUT TO:
INT. STORE. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 12.18
PETER SABELLA is behind the counter, there is no-one else there. ROBERT PAXTON walks in, he’s a bit nervous and he looks around for SADDIQ SUAAD.

PETER SABELLA

If you’re looking for my partner, he’s out delivering.
ROBERT PAXTON just stands there, suddenly nervous about being in the store again.

PETER SABELLA

Don’t be nervous, come forward.
ROBERT PAXTON walks up to the counter and puts the coin on it.

PETER SABELLA

(picking up the coin and looking at it) I see you still have the coin. Well it’s far more than you need for a loaf of bread.
The door to the store opens and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT comes in as ROBERT PAXTON looks round nervously. When he sees it is WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, ROBERT PAXTON relaxes.

PETER SABELLA

Hello William.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I see you have met the messenger who delivered the message to me.

PETER SABELLA

Indeed I have. It would appear we did him somewhat a disservice.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Could you make it up to him by taking payment for the bread and saying no more about it?

PETER SABELLA

That sounds like a satisfactory proposition to me. How about you Robert, shall you and I be friends?

ROBERT PAXTON

Yes.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Robert if you want someone to look after your money so that the older children don’t take it I’m sure Peter would be happy to open an account for you.

PETER SABELLA

An excellent idea.
PETER takes ROBERT PAXTON over to a book and he writes in it.

PETER SABELLA

Now look Robert, I will put the amount you have in here and take away the amount you have spent on the bread. If we take that number from that number this is how much you have left.

ROBERT PAXTON

How much is that?

PETER SABELLA

Don’t you know?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You will just have to trust Peter. It will be all right, he is a very honest man.

PETER SABELLA

You can come in and buy things when you need it.

ROBERT PAXTON

I’m going to go and tell my Dad, it will cheer him up.
ROBERT PAXTON leaves the store as PETER SABELLA and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT grin at each other.
CUT TO:
EXT. QUIET SIDE STREET. 12th OCTOBER 1485. 12.20
We see a gang of boys standing around something. We push in and we see that they have once again trapped ROBERT PAXTON. They are making noises, flicking his hair and patting his head. Suddenly they are forced apart and JEREMIAH PAXTON forces his way in to protect his son.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Leave my boy alone.
The children don't leave immediately but once they see how resolute JEREMIAH PAXTON is, they soon back away and move off.

ROBERT PAXTON

Dad you're up.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I know son, I've been away too long.
JEREMIAH PAXTON and ROBERT PAXTON hug each other, ROBERT PAXTON filled with tears of joy at seeing his father up and about, JEREMIAH PAXTON filled with tears of remorse at finally seeing what ROBERT PAXTON had to go through.
They walk off together, ROBERT PAXTON helping to support his father. They walk off down the side street avoiding the Main Street. Farther up the street we see EDWYN MILLER walking back into town with MORYS WENLOCK. As they reach the Justice's Office they part and give a half wave. EDWYN MILLER comes towards us and we see that he is going to go right past the group of bullies that are still around. ROGER WALSH is showing off in front of the others. Just as EDWYN MILLER draws close enough to hear…

ROGER WALSH

I could have beaten him if I'd wanted to, just like FitzHerbert beat Chough.

EDWYN MILLER

Really?
The children all look up and round at EDWYN MILLER.

EDWYN MILLER

You are nothing like FitzHerbert; none of you are. If he were among you he would speak up and tell you to leave Robert alone. (crouches down) Have you ever seen him pick on people he could easily beat?
The children shake their heads.

EDWYN MILLER

Do you think he could beat you?
The children nod.

EDWYN MILLER

Do you think I could, or the Justice, or the Bartender?
The Children nod.

EDWYN MILLER

It would be miserable for you if we did wouldn't it?
The children nod.

EDWYN MILLER

It takes no bravery to stand in front of people urging you on when the odds are stacked in your favour. To be brave you have to stand up for what's right.
 
If you truly want to be like FitzHerbert, the next time you see someone in trouble be the first one to go to their aid. It's not always easy, but it is the right thing to do.
EDWYN MILLER turns to ROGER WALSH who looks terrified.

EDWYN MILLER

Next time I see you, I hope you are like FitzHerbert, I really do. Now, have you seen him recently?

ROGER WALSH

He's in the store.

EDWYN MILLER

Thank you.
EDWYN MILLER walks off and the children look at each other. As we see EDWYN MILLER walk away the children split up and go their separate ways. The last to go is ROGER WALSH.
EDWYN MILLER goes to the store and enters it.
CUT TO:
INT. JERMIAH'S HUT 12th OCTOBER 1485. 15.30
JEREMIAH PAXTON and ROBERT PAXTON are tidying the hut up and then ROBERT PAXTON tugs at his dad's shirt and runs around a small chair.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Why you little urchin.
JEREMIAH PAXTON chases ROBERT PAXTON and catches him and they both giggle, obviously having a good time. The hut is also cleaned and aired. Quite different from the state it was in earlier.
There is a knock at the door. JEREMIAH PAXTON goes to the door and opens it to find EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT at the door. They have a basket with some food in it.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Come on in, good to see you both.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We brought you a few things from the store.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I don't want any charity.

EDWYN MILLER

It's not charity it's payment.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's right, Robert was paid by the person who sent the message but he was not paid by me, so you have to let me repay my debt.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Very well, you two don't seem to be the kind to say no to. Besides it is a minor thing compared to what you have done for me already. (pauses for a moment, then looks at ROBERT PAXTON) Son would you go and get some more water from the spring.
ROBERT PAXTON doesn't seem to want to go.

EDWYN MILLER

Yes come on I'll go with you.
EDWYN MILLER motions to ROBERT PAXTON and they both leave the hut. WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and JEREMIAH PAXTON pause, listening to hear that they have gone.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I wanted to thank you for what you did.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I didn't really do anything, it seems to me that you did it for yourself.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

You're probably wondering what got me into such a state?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well no I..

JEREMIAH PAXTON

It wasn't what you might think, the leg I lost at Tewkesbury. I'm not really sure how I survived that day on the bloody meadow.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Perhaps God in his mercy brought you back here to look after your son?

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I didn't look after anyone, I was a burden. If god had any mercy it was to make me married to an angel. She kept things going and nursed me back to health as well. Then Robert was born and we were all so happy, then God abandoned us.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

He took your wife from you, didn't he?
JEREMIAH PAXTON just looks at him with tears in his eyes.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Yes I recognise that look in your eyes.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

It was just last year; consumption.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(bows his head) He took Katherine from me that same way the year before.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I'm sorry, I had no idea.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's all right. I had friends who helped me through and now so do you. It was not until I came to this town that I found someone I could talk to about her, but when I did it helped. Perhaps you should do the same?

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I ought to talk to Robert, I know he misses her too.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well we must all find our own ways of coping, I'm glad you have found yours.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Thanks to you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Me, what did I do?

JEREMIAH PAXTON

You and Edwyn. Edwyn more perhaps. I've been lost in self pity in this hut, while leaving Robert to fend for himself, and me. It was hearing the truth in cold hard tones that struck home. It was as though someone threw me rope, I had to force myself to climb but it seemed as though there was a way.
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT reaches into the basket and gets out a small bottle, he hands it to JEREMIAH PAXTON.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If you start to slide back down, this will help.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

This looks like one of Eleanour's concoctions.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's right.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Then it is sure to work. (pause) Can I ask you something?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You can, but I cannot swear I will answer.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

All right then let me try making a guess and see how I do.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

All right.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

You seem to have a certain bearing, you have a fine sword and you. You have authority in your voice that I have heard before, at Tewkesbury and other places. That scar on your face, you got it on the field of battle.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

That's quite a story.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Is it true?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well it… er…

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I thought so.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Eh?

JEREMIAH PAXTON

When I came back from Tewkesbury, I had been in a losing army and I came back here and I was able to quietly settle down. It seems that you are oh so important when they need you to fight but if you can't fight anymore, they just forget you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Sometimes it's better to be forgotten.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I'm glad you feel that way. If I'm right, we were enemies on the field of Tewkesbury.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If you're right I was in the vanquished army this time.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

It makes no difference to me, my fighting days are over.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I thought mine were too, but my past clings to me like the scar on my face.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I wonder whether it will always be like this, I would like to keep the hope that it will be different for Robert.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(pauses and then looks up as if offering hope) Keep hold of that hope, at least for Robert. (pause) Peter has said that if he will help around the store and run some errands he will not only give him some food in payment, he will also teach him to read and to count.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I don't know this Peter.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You have been out for a long time. He owns the store.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Wouldn't it be better to teach Robert to fight?  He was being set upon when I went down into the town.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I can fight and yet I work for Peter. It is those with knowledge that will be victorious.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Why would they do this for my son?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Well he was honest and he showed an interest in the books, beyond that I'm not sure you will have to ask Peter.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I will.
The door opens and in comes ROBERT PAXTON and EDWYN MILLER.

EDWYN MILLER

You will what?

JEREMIAH PAXTON

I will get this land back into shape, the way it used to be.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(standing up) I have an appointment to keep so I will leave you now, please excuse me.

EDWYN MILLER

I'll come along with you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You don't have to, you can stay.

EDWYN MILLER

Are you trying to get rid of me?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

No of course not.

EDWYN MILLER

Then I'm sure Jeremiah and Robert will understand, (turning to them) won't you.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

Of course.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

All right then, come along.

EDWYN MILLER / WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Goodbye.

JEREMIAH PAXTON

'Bye and thanks for everything.
EDWYN MILLER and WILLIAM FITZHERBERT leave.
CUT TO:
EXT. ROAD FROM JERMIAH'S HUT 12th OCTOBER 1485. 15.45

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

We must part soon. I have to go and meet Addison, and in view of the way you two get on, I think it best if I meet him alone.

EDWYN MILLER

But I thought you were meeting him at dusk?

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

So does he, but I see no reason to stick to his timings. If he wishes to meet me he will be there. (pause) Besides I have another appointment at dusk, that is if you will agree to meet me by the stone circle.

EDWYN MILLER

You know I will. If you are leaving, I will come with you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You have made a life here, and you have a love that needs to be cherished and nurtured. Your place is here.

EDWYN MILLER

My place is…

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Please Edwyn not this time. Tonight I will say goodbye to my squire.

EDWYN MILLER

Then your squire will be there.
The two of them walk on a few more yards and then they go separate ways. They look at each other and then the ground but neither of them want to speak. We go with EDWYN MILLER and he walks away from WILLIAM FITZHERBERT.

EDWYN MILLER

(to himself) I'll be there all right, but I'll be damned if I will leave you to go off without me.
EXT. BANBURY ROAD CROSSROADS 12th OCTOBER 1485. 16.01
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT walks up to the crossroads. He waits for a moment and then STEPHEN ADDISON appears.

STEPHEN ADDISON

You're early.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I saw no sense in waiting to hear what you had to say to me.

STEPHEN ADDISON

Good. I'm here to offer you a way back into the household.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

(looking interested and hopeful) Lord Lovell's household?

STEPHEN ADDISON

Yes, he's raising an army in Ireland to bring over and put the true king on the throne.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

The true king is dead, we saw him fall on the field of Bosworth.

STEPHEN ADDISON

We have a boy by the name of Lambert Simnel.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

A boy? This country does not need a boy on the throne.

STEPHEN ADDISON

This boy is the Earl of Warwick.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Do you believe that?

STEPHEN ADDISON

I believe what I'm told to believe.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I no longer have that luxury.

STEPHEN ADDISON

We need you. The army is mostly raw recruits drawn from the land.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

If you are going to take an army of peasant farmers against trained and well-armed soldiers it will be a massacre.

STEPHEN ADDISON

That's why we need your help.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

You do not need my help, you can get those farmers killed just as easily whether I am there or not.

STEPHEN ADDISON

I had hoped this would go better, I had to do much convincing to get a chance to come and find you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

How did you find me?

STEPHEN ADDISON

I heard rumours about Chough being bested. I knew there couldn't be many who could do that, so I thought I would come and see for myself.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

And here I am, but I cannot go with you, I belong here.

STEPHEN ADDISON

I am offering you redemption, this will be your last chance. If you stay here, there will never be a way back for you.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I knew, the moment I led Lord Lovell to the rear that there would be no way back for me.

STEPHEN ADDISON

Very well. We have never been close friends but I have never considered you an enemy. I do not intend to start now. I will return to my household and say that William FitzHerbert, the King's General could not be found.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Thank you.

STEPHEN ADDISON

Well I see now it is true.
The two of them grasp forearms and STEPHEN ADDISON walks off.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Good luck to you and Lord Lovell.
STEPHEN ADDISON waves an arm without looking back.
CUT TO:
EXT. BY THE KINGS STONE 12th OCTOBER 1485. DUSK
WILLIAM FITZHERBERT is standing looking up at the King's Stone. EDWYN MILLER walks up.

EDWYN MILLER

I came as you asked, but don't expect me to let you wander off without me.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

Very well I won't, I am not going anywhere.

EDWYN MILLER

But you said...

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT

I said I wanted to say goodbye to my squire. (pause) When we came here I swore a vow to the King's Stone and I became a knight of the Stone King. I would be honoured if you would join me as a fellow knight. I know it sounds silly but I have tried to live by that vow.

EDWYN MILLER

You'd better tell me what the vow is.
WE pan up to the sky it gets slightly darker and as we pan down we hear..

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT (OC)

The king I served is dead and I have been exiled for carrying out my duty.
We pan out and down to see WILLIAM FITZHERBERT and EDWYN MILLER alongside each other.

WILLIAM FITZHERBERT / EDWYN MILLER

I stand now before a stone hewn from and rooted in this land.
 
As an arch is only as strong as its weakest stone, so is a nation as strong as it's poorest citizen. Once the weakest stone fails so does the arch.
 
Where ever I see anyone suffer injustice, I will fight with my sword in my hand and compassion in my heart. (they each lift their sword upwards and kiss the hilt) I am a Knight of the Stone King and this is my vow. 
FADE OUT:
END SHOW


© Copyright 2019 Kevin Broughton. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments:

More Historical Fiction Scripts