ONE BAR!

Reads: 149  | Likes: 3  | Shelves: 3  | Comments: 4

More Details
Status: Finished  |  Genre: Flash Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


When the family arrive at their holiday destination the two boys, who had been full of excitement, are seriously unimpressed...

Submitted: June 26, 2018

A A A | A A A

Submitted: June 26, 2018

A A A

A A A


ONE BAR!

They had been counting off the days for their holiday. Ever since they were little it had been their favourite place, with its high, grassy sand dunes in which they had gambolled and frolicked, the golden beach where they had built grand sand castles, and the clear blue sea where they had paddled and swam. Then there was the ‘pink shop’, stuffed with delicious ice-creams of every flavour imaginable, and tempting chocolates.

“Come on Buster, we’re off to the sea,” the boys enthused.  The family’s black Labrador jumped into the car, his intelligent amber eyes shining and his tail wagging like a rudder, as the family finally set off.

On their arrival, thirteen year old Jack and Andy his twelve year old brother, piled out of the car with their usual excitement. “Dad, where’s my ruck-sack?” Jack yelled.

“We’re trying to unpack the car… get yourselves down here and help us,” came the reply.

When everything had been dumped in the apartment, Jack sat down on the sofa and reached into his ruck sack for his iPad. “What’s this?” he asked, staring down hard at the screen, his face crestfallen and his pale blue eyes filled with despair. Andy peered over his shoulder. “This is no good, there’s only one bar. What are we going to do for a whole week without a wifi signal,” he echoed in distraught gasps.

“Dad, you really need to sort this out.” Jack ordered, a hint of panic now discernible in his tone.

“It’s actually not my priority right now,” said Dad, heaving a case through to the bedroom.

By now Jack had become seriously disturbed. “Dad, I’m warning you now, I’m not staying here without a proper wifi signal.”

“You’re on holiday,” screamed Mum. “If you think you’re going to spend all your time on those gadgets, you’ve got another thing coming. You were looking forward to it, and you’ve always had such a great time.”

“I want to go home,” the boys yelled in unison. “We hate it here.”

That evening, with the setting sun casting its rosy hue over the gleaming horizon and with fishing boats bobbing gently on the swell, the boys skulked along in miserable rebellion. Jack carried his ruck sack on his back, as if it had become some sort of physical appendage… an extension to his very being.

Their parents paused to study the menu at one of the local pubs. “Come on you two, we’re going in for something to eat.”

The boys reluctantly swaggered in, their lips curled in an attitude of intense loathing before slumping down dejectedly at a table. “Not hungry,” declared Andy.

“Is there wifi here?” asked Jack, delving into his rucksack for his iPad with a hopeful glint in his eye.

“Andy, we’ve got a strong signal,” he exclaimed, with a victorious punch of a fist.

In an instant, as their heads lowered over their respective gadgets, their attitude changed from one of abject hopelessness to resolute elation. “I’m starving,” said Jack, his youthful face lit up with renewed interest.

And so a successful compromise was reached. During the day they regressed into their former activities of dune jumping with Buster, crabbing contests off the jetty, swimming in the sea, kite flying on the beach and stuffing their faces with the delights of the pink shop. Whereas in the evening, their choice of restaurant was not so much dependent on the menus on offer, but on the strength of the wifi signal to feed their voracious appetite for technology.

“See, you can still enjoy doing all the things you use to,” Dad said, encouraged by their zest for outdoor activities during their week’s holiday.”

“It’s been okay, but I can’t wait to get back on xBox to play ‘Fortnite’ with me mates,” said Jack, fidgeting in his seat.

“And me… its ace,” echoed Andy.

“Well I’m warning you now, there are going to be new rules about the amount of time you spend on technology when we get home,” warned Dad.

“It’s for your own good,” added Mom.

The dark defiance that blazed back at them, signalled the long battle that was about to commence.  


© Copyright 2019 Sue Harris. All rights reserved.

Add Your Comments:

Comments

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply

avatar

Author
Reply

More Flash Fiction Short Stories