Islington Associates Zurich Switzerland: Emerging Markets Surprise But the Fed Isn’t Blinking: Economy Week

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India joined the club of emerging market central banks raising interest rates in a surprise shift as the likes of Turkey to Indonesia seek to navigate a rising dollar, bubbling inflation and a slew
of political uncertainties.

Submitted: July 01, 2018

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Submitted: July 01, 2018

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India joined the club of emerging market central banks raising interest rates in a surprise shift as the likes of Turkey to Indonesia seek to navigate a rising dollar, bubbling inflation and a slew of political uncertainties.

India joined the club of emerging market central banks raising interest rates in a surprise shift as the likes of Turkey to Indonesia seek to navigate a rising dollar, bubbling inflation and a slew of political uncertainties.

 
 

The U.S.-China saga continues as global leaders prepare to meet in Ottawa, and Europe showed more cracks albeit not enough to stop the European Central Bank tilting towards tighter monetary policy.

 
 

Here’s our weekly wrap of what’s going on in the world economy:

 
 

Emerging Problems

The global tightening cycle claimed another player, with the Reserve Bank of India unexpectedly raising interest rates for the first time since 2014 just days after the governor publicly pleaded for the Federal Reserve to slow down its hikes. Indonesia’s new central bank chief, who increased rates last week in an out-of-cycle meeting, joined him in that call. Turkey also sprung a surprise by boosting its benchmark more than predicted. As investors wonder which country is next, Brazil is wobbling. Drama in Malaysia centered on 1MDB scandal fallout: Bank Negara’s governor resigned. Governments across Southeast Asia enacted subsidies and price controls in a bid to tame inflation. Embattled Argentina, whose central bank meets next week, secured a $50 billion stand-by arrangement from the International Monetary Fund as it struggles to regain investor confidence.


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