A Yellow Ribbon

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Sports  |  House: Booksie Classic
When I was in track I was the most nervous person on the team. I would constantly worry that I'd miss a race altogether. One of my problems was that I never did good enough for myself. If I got second place I wanted first. If I got third I wanted second place. When we got our ribbons I was never happy with my work.

Submitted: October 06, 2018

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Submitted: October 06, 2018

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A Yellow Ribbon by Dalanie Brown

 

When I was in track I was the most nervous person on the team. I would constantly worry that I'd miss a race altogether, but I never did. It was probably thanks to this worrying that I always got there on time. One of my problems was that I never did good enough for myself. If I got second place I wanted first. If I got third I wanted second place. When we got our ribbons I was never happy with my work.

First of all, I stood around with the other girls in the middle of the field. My next race was something I wasn’t used to, an 800-meter dash. I heard my event being called and handed my sweatpants to my friend. I anxiously sprinted to the starting line even though there was no need. "Good luck," my friend called out from behind me.

Next, I stuck on the number I had been assigned and began stretching on the asphalt track. I wasn't sure if I was supposed to be in this race, so I asked a person holding a clipboard.

"Am I in this race?”

"Name?"

"Dalanie Brown,” I mumbled fidgeting.

"Line up," said a man into a megaphone.

"No, it says your not."

"Oh," I murmured relieved, "okay." Just to be sure I asked the man holding the megaphone. "Do I run?"

"No, just wait."

I stood off to the side and watched. Smoke exited the barrel of the gun accompanied by a loud bang. As a result, the girls ran around a big curve and then formed a line as they evened out. I watched with my arms crossed feeling very relaxed. And then, the man with the megaphone looked at me. His eyes dilated and his mouth opened. He lifted his arm and dropped it, "Go!"

My heart beat rapidly and my hands got clammy. I panicked. They had already started running without me! I scrambled to find my lane and sprinted the curve. Even though this was a mid-distance race I ran as fast as I could. I kept running and gradually caught up to the other runners. I heard the crowd screaming as I passed one girl, then two, then three. I heard my dad shouting my name.

I crossed the finish line and burst into tears. I had not gotten the place I wanted, and would probably be remembered as the girl who ran late. I attributed the blame to me not asking enough questions. Surprisingly though, none of my friends said a thing to me about it. In fact, they were proud. "You did amazing," one said enthusiastically.

"Wow, that was amazing," exclaimed another.

"I Can't believe you passed so many people!"

At first, I was very disappointed in myself for getting that place, but hearing all those compliments was gratifying for me. This experience changed my perspective on self-image and made me realize a valuable lesson. I wanted to do my best, and I did. I realized that it didn't matter that I ran late, because I ran my best and my work was notable. My legs ached badly and I could barely stand. We later found out there was a mix up in the schedule. I laughed for thinking it was my fault.

The ribbons for our team came in the mail about a week later. I lifted mine out of the box. It was a beautiful shade of yellow with a gold runner printed on it. Even though a yellow ribbon meant I was not in the top three and I had gotten 4th place I smiled, because yellow was my favorite color.

 
 


© Copyright 2018 Charlotte Ross. All rights reserved.

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