Rainbows

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
Rainbows

Submitted: October 19, 2018

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Submitted: October 19, 2018

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Rainbows

Probably long before there was any human being to see it. It is a natural phenomenon of light and atmospheric moisture.  Rainbows have been around as long as people can remember, so it would be impossible to say when the first recorded one was. It happened more than a million years ago, when Ardipithecus had just turned into Australopithecus, which was the earliest beginning of non-animal intelligence. An australopithecine was eating with a friend in a light shower on the Savannah in Ethiopia. The rain stopped and a rainbow appeared. The apeman stopped eating and grunted. He tried to grab the pretty colors, but couldn't. His friend hooted and tried to do the same, with no success. The two hominids stared at the rainbow for a few seconds; then, with the equivalent of a mental shrug, they went back to stripping decayed tapir flesh from bones. Later, back at the cave, the first apeman tried to tell his mate about the strange thing he saw. He drew an unsteady squiggle in the dust at her feet. This was the first rainbow ever recorded, millions of years before our time

A rainbow, It is a rule that violet light bends the most and red color bends the least way. Most of the light passes through the rain drop. Because of bending of colors in different ways and on different angle each color that emerges from a raindrop produces a spectrum of colors. As only single color from each drop reaches to observer, so there are number of raindrops from which each rain drop reflect the light back to an observer at slightly different angle, as to produce different primary colors of rainbow. Secondary rainbow appears above the primary rainbow. When two colors reflection occur inside a raindrop at such angle that it results into secondary rainbow. When weaker light that start emerging to produce a dimmer rainbow effect.. Refraction happens as light enters and leaves a prism. Red light is refracted the least and violet light is refracted the most. This causes the different colours in the light to spread out to form a spectrum. Separating the colours like this is called dispersion. We say that the light has been dispersed.
Answered In Meteorology and Weather

A rainbow is created when invisible light filters through a clear substance or material like rain. The Light we can see like the sun, is not actual light, what we see is fire, what happens is Light itself becomes inviable when Dark Burns. The Sun is made of light and Dark, When Fire burns like the sun does light is released from dark. This means space itself burns around the sun and light comes from the suns centre.. A true rainbow is created when invisible light gets caught in a Form of Clear sphere type lens, just like a Raindrop. The Invisible light filters outwards, If the Liquid was shaped like a Magifying glass then the Invisible light would Compress into a Beam of Light. But an actual rainbow is created by a Sphere type clear Liquid like a raindrop.. A Triangular Clear Object acts like a Mirror when invisible light hits it, so the best or the Rainbow Shoot out mostly at an angle. If you use a Sphere of Glass what is Mostly Hollow and You had i Liquid to slow down the Invisible light, The Invisible light would Reflect into the Centre of the Sphere, The Outside of the Sphere would create a Sphere Shaped Rainbow. It is a rule that violet light bends that most and red color bends least way. Most of the light passes through the rain drop. Because of bending of colors in different ways and on different angle each color that emerges from raindrop produce a spectrum of colors. As only single color from each drop reaches to observer, so there are number of raindrops from which each rain drop reflect the light back to an observer at slightly different angle, as to produce different primary colors of rainbow. above the primary rainbow. When two colors reflection occur inside a raindrop at such angle that it results into secondary rainbow. When weaker light that start emerging to produce a dimmer rainbow effect.. Refraction happens as light enters and leaves a prism. Red light is refracted the least and violet light is refracted the most. This causes the different colours in the light to spread out to form a spectrum. Separating the colours like this is called dispersion. We say that the light has been dispersed. Answer . It is a rule that violet light bend that most and red color bend least way. Most of the light passes through the rain drop. Because of bending of colors in different ways and on different angle each color that emerges from raindrop produce a spectrum of colors. As only single color from each drop reaches to observer, so there are number of raindrops from which each rain drop reflect the light back to an observer at slightly different angle, as to produce different primary colors of rainbow. 

A rainbow is a multicolored arc made by light striking water droplets.  The most familiar type rainbow is produced when sunlight strikes raindrops in front of a viewer at a precise angle (42 degrees). Rainbows can also be viewed around fog, sea spray, or waterfalls. 
 
A rainbow is an optical illusion—it does not actually exist in a specific spot in the sky. The appearance of a rainbow depends on where you're standing and where the sun (or other source of light) is shining.  The sun or other source of light is usually behind the person seeing the rainbow. In fact, the center of a primary rainbow is the antisolar point, the imaginary point exactly opposite the sun.
 
Rainbows are the result of the refraction and reflection of light. Both refraction and reflection are phenomena that involve a change in a wave's direction. A refracted wave may appear "bent", while a reflected wave might seem to "bounce back" from a surface or other wavefront.  Light entering a water droplet is refracted. It is then reflected by the back of the droplet. As this reflected light leaves the droplet, it is refracted again, at multiple angles.  The radius of a rainbow is determined by the water droplets' refractive index. A refractive index is the measure of how much a ray of light refracts (bends) as it passes from one medium to another—from air to water, for example. A droplet with a high refractive index will help produce a rainbow with a smaller radius. Saltwater has a higher refractive index than freshwater, for instance, so rainbows formed by sea spray will be smaller than rainbows formed by rain.
 
Rainbows are actually full circles. The antisolar point is the center of the circle. Viewers in aircraft can sometimes see these circular rainbows.  Viewers on the ground can only see the light reflected by raindrops above the horizon. Because each person's horizon is a little different, no one actually sees a full rainbow from the ground. In fact, no one sees the same rainbow—each person has a different antisolar point, each person has a different horizon. Someone who appears below or near the "end" of a rainbow to one viewer will see another rainbow, extending from his or her own horizon.
 
The colours of a rainbow shows up as a spectrum of light: a band of familiar colors that include red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. The name "Roy G. Biv" is an easy way to remember the colors of the rainbow, and the order in which they appear: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. (Many scientists, however, think "indigo" is too close to blue to be truly distinguishable.)  White light is how our eyes perceive all the colors of the rainbow mixed together. Sunlight appears white. 
 
When sunlight hits a rain droplet, some of the light is reflected. The electromagnetic spectrum is made of light with many different wavelengths, and each is reflected at a different angle. Thus, spectrum is separated, producing a rainbow.  Red has the longest wavelength of visible light, about 650 nanometers. It usually appears on the outer part of a rainbow's arch. Violet has the shortest wavelength (about 400 nanometers) and it usually appears on the inner arch of the rainbow.  At their edges, the colors of a rainbow actually overlap. This produces a sheen of "white" light, making the inside of a rainbow much brighter than the outside.  Visible light is only part of a rainbow. Infrared radiation exists just beyond visible red light, while ultraviolet is just beyond violet. There are also radio waves (beyond infrared), x-rays (beyond ultraviolet), and gamma radiation (beyond x-rays). Scientists use an instrument called a spectrometer to study these invisible parts of the rainbow. 
 
Refraction is the bending of light (it also happens with sound, water and other waves) as it passes from one transparent substance into another.  This bending by refraction makes it possible for us to have lenses, magnifying glasses, prisms and rainbows. Even our eyes depend upon this bending of light. Without refraction, we wouldn’t be able to focus light onto our retina.
Rainbow.  A rainbow is formed when light enters each water droplet, and the different colours bend (refract) at slightly different angles. They reflect off the inside of the drop before refracting again as they leave. The shorter wavelengths refract more.  A rainbow is caused because each colour refracts at slightly different angles as it enters, reflects off the inside and then leaves each tiny drop of rain.

A rainbow is easy to create using a spray bottle and the sunshine. The centre of the circle of the rainbow will always be the shadow of your head on the ground.


 When it rains, and it stops raining, the sun comes out.... that's what forms a rainbow!  Rainbows appear in rainforests  ,sometimes they might because formation requires sunlight and moisture in the air which rain forests' frequently experience. This doesn't mean a rainbow will form every time both of these situations are present though.  Rainbows appear when it is sunny and it then rains. Try projecting white light through a glass triangular prism. Then all will be clear.

The first colours of the rainbow starting from the outside: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet. Violet on the inside of the arc to Red on the outside.
Apparently, a rainbow appears in the sky because both, rain and sun, mix together and produce light and colours. Some people belive that at the end of a rainbow is gold. But how does the gold just appear suddenly?

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the longest rainbow appeared for 6 hours - in the sky of Wetherby, UK, on 14March 1994.

Rainbows cannot appear if there's no rain and sun afterwards. Rainbows root word is rain so for that reason rain has to appear in this event. But some rainbows can appear in different weather? Rainbows cannot appear with out rain. 

The colors of light are determined by the frequency or wave lengthof light rays. Sunlight contains all colors. In the case of a rainbow the atmosphereseparates these colors spreading them out. Red is the lowest frequency and thus comesfirst. Violet is highest frequency and thus comes last.


Color, Light and Energy conclusion. The rainbow inspired scientists to further explore the nature of color and light because the rainbow allowed drawing the conclusion that color is somehow connected to light. If we want to better understand color, we must take a closer look at light. And, if we want to better understand light, we must care about energy. 

There is a relationship between color, a light processing system, light, a light emitting system and energy.  The light emitting system (light source) is of interest to us because it can influence two properties of light which then make the input for the light processing system.

Light is a form of electromagnetic radiation and the word radiation implies that light travels in waves. The light waves have interruptions though. This is why we say that a light ray consists of wave-packets, called photons.  Now, the light source, for one, can influence the number of wave-packets (photons) per period of time and, two, the light's wavelength. 


Let's look at a wavelength equation to see how a light source
uses energy to influence wavelength. 

 

 

This means we can formulate the relationship: The more energy is used for one photon, the smaller the wavelength of light. Since frequency is inversely proportional to wavelength you can also say: The more energy is used for one photon, the higher the frequency of light. 


Let's look at a Number of Photons equation to see how a light source
uses energy to influence the number of photons. 

 

 

 


This means we can formulate the relationship:
Under the assumption a light source keeps the wavelength constant:
The more energy is used, the more photons are emitted (increasing intensity). 


A light source can have the ability to change wavelength and number
of photons at the same time. Can a light source also change properties
of light, if energy input stays constant? What would happen with either property? 

 

A rearrangement of the above formula simplifies finding the answers: 

 

 

This means we can formulate the relationship: Under the assumption a light source keeps total energy constant: The more photons are emitted, the higher their wavelength. 


Color Spectrum: Visible Range of Wavelength.  The range of wavelength where em-radiation is defined as visible light is approximately between 400nm to 700nm, where one nanometer (nm) equals to 0.000 001 millimeters. 

Shorter wavelength (more energy) radiation is called ultraviolet. Longer
wavelength (less energy) radiation is called infrared. 

A light processing system uses wavelength to differentiate hues (red,
orange, yellow... ). It transforms wavelength into a certain hue value.
We can visualize this transformation for the visible range of wavelength
by drawing a color spectrum chart.

 

 

Deemed as one of nature’s most vibrant meteorological masterpieces, the colourful rainbow is produced when light from the Sun interacts with damp air.
The rainbow is an exciting meteorological phenomenon.  While it is helpful to understand how it is formed, it is not essential to admire its beauty.


 The End

 

 

 

 


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