An Aspiring Writer’s Fear: Getting the Work Out-There

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: April 09, 2019

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Submitted: April 09, 2019

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For a significant part of my writing experience, I felt very uneasy throwing my ideas and thoughts out there freely. While I still fairly consider myself entitled to only an “aspiring writer” qualification, I thought I’d put some observations together and offer advice for others like me, working up the courage to start sharing their flow of imagination. This isn’t life-changing, but I sure hope it gives someone a cheerful kickstart.

1. Practice creative writing with a random topic selection. This way, you will strengthen your habits and rely less on inspiration. You’ll also be able to touch upon a wider variety of topics while finding your authentic voice, eliminating the difficulty that may arise on only being able to write about deep and personal matters which you don’t feel comfortable sharing.

2. Don’t expect feedback - ever. Don’t judge your writing by the number of follow-up likes and comments. There are a hundred reasons for why people are scrolling past your work, which don’t necessarily correlate to the quality of your skill. Strategies do exist on how to make your material more presentable and attention-grabbing. However, you’ll first have to ensure that you get rid of the emotional prospect of having certain expectations from publishing, to avoid beating yourself up after every failure.

3. Whenever you’re in an interactive workshop or class, use every chance to share your work (copyrighted, in the best case). Facing negative feedback, if there is any, is the only way to get over your fear of it. Don’t waste time dwelling upon why someone didn’t see your efforts, rather look at it analytically: how is this remark important for further growth? What can be done to improve my skill?

Being an introvert and getting yourself out there isn’t easy, but you have to get up after every time insecurity, second-guessing and self-doubt knocks you down. Slowly and steadily, practice after practice, the fear of rejection will evaporate, and your faith in your project will grow.


© Copyright 2019 Alexandra Layne. All rights reserved.

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