What you should know about Europe

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: April 19, 2019

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Submitted: April 19, 2019

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In case you live in Europe, good for you, you might know some of these things. In case you live somewhere else, you might know less about these things. Here is a random list of things you should know about Europe even if you didn't live there.

First off, Europe has a long history, and if you don't know about it, you don't really understand the history behind any other place either. What is something that has an affect on our daily lives, is Ancient Greece. They created philosophy, along with other sciences. If it weren't for Ancient Greece, we wouldn't have current biology, mathematics or physics. Along with that, it's usually thought that Western literature dates back to those times. Especially theater was a popular thing that has lasted until this day. It's well known that democracy dates back to Ancient Greece. It didn't mean the same thing as now, but it was the idea that mattered, and without that idea, we wouldn't have modern democracies. The name Europe also comes from Greece mythology, even though it wasn't used that time.

After Greece, Rome became the new place to be. The Roman Empire inherited a lot of Greece's culture, but they did a lot of things on their own. The Romans created the first roadsystem that expanded to the whole of Europe. While Greece was located in Greece, the Roman Empire streched to as far as Northern Europe. The continent wasn't very united, but it was all of the same Empire that had similar culture.

During the late Roman era, Christianity became a common religion. After the Rome fell, Christianity became the thing that sewed Europe together for a thousand years. The European history lives within people nowadays, as we wouldn't have the Catholic and Orthodox church, let alone the Protestants if it weren't for what happened in Europe. 

After the Middle Ages, science in Europe was the new hit. Church was criticezed more and that lead to philosophers to tell their ideas. The Reneissance was a time of growth and it was the basis for many things we live by today. Also during that time, new continents were discovered and populated.

Another thing you must know about Europe, is that it's different than the EU. The EU has currently 28 members, 27 when the UK leaves. Europe as a geographical continent has 50 states, some of which are party in Asia, like Russia and Turkey. The EU is a totally different thing. 

It is important, though. The EU's history is a confusing one, and the functions today are even more confusing. What you need to know, is that the EU members, along with some other countries, share free market and freedom of movement between people and goods. There are no tariffs, and you technically don't even need a passport to go to another EU country if you're an EU citizen. Any ID should do. 

The EU is kind of like the United States, but not as strictly put together. You can see the countries as states that have their own laws and representatives. The EU has also laws and regulations that the countries have to follow. A lot of decisions are done on the EU level, but those are usully not as obvious as the laws that the countries have themselves.

The Euro is a common currency in Europe, but once again, it's not used in all EU countries or in every European countries. It's useful, though, as it helps people a lot when travelling aborad. Chances are, you might not have to worry about the currency exchange, but always check first.

The last thing you as a non-European should know, is that it's not the same. There are as many cultures in Europe as there are countries. Even more. The culture in Northern Europe is nothing like the culture in Southern Europe. A lot of people think of people talking French and drinkin wine in their castle when they think of Europe, but that's not the case. There are dozens of languages in Europe. Not every country has castles, and not everyone drinks wine. Chances are, you'll come across Swedish or Polish vodka before wine. If people in Germany and Norway act differently, it's because they are different people from different cultures. Both are still European countries.


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