We are taught to frame our emotions

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Feminist Circle

Submitted: April 25, 2019

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Submitted: April 25, 2019

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In society, we all play more than one part - a student, a worker, a teacher, a colleague, etc. This encourages us to strengthen our name, our actions, our image. Being empowered by these universal requirements and finding our niche out there, we often don’t realize how along the way, we are subconsciously taught to frame our emotions.

And this comes in many shapes or forms. Men are taught not to be sensitive, to be ashamed of softness and tears. Women are taught to shut down their desire to lead, to get rid of “masculine” energy. We are taught that if you aren’t Justin Timberlake, you will look hysterical at a dance. We are taught that if you aren’t Whitney Houston, better stay away from karaoke nights. We discover that certain facial expressions - the ones that you tend to make when surprised, amazed, unimpressed, bored or afraid - aren’t aesthetically pleasing. To societal roles, that’s fair and beneficial. However, to our human nature and mental state, it can become unsettling and limiting.

So how do you break out of these imaginary frames while sustaining your societal roles? When you’re on your own, let yourself be flawed. Let yourself be misunderstood. Grant yourself the gift of what feels like a long-lost privilege: to be silly, bizarre, comedic and tragic. Dance alone to your favorite song in a way that your body leads the moves and gives in to the energy. Cry, whether the reason behind it feels valid enough or not. Write the most enraged, gruesome letter, revealing all the demons inside - and throw it into the fire. Be funny, be free.

Think about your words, actions, habits and accomplishments being proof of you doing your best in life. Now put a hand over your heart. Your emotions are the most beautiful, uncovered, irreplaceable proof that it’s still beating.

Isn’t that a reason to stop neglecting them?


© Copyright 2019 Alexandra Layne. All rights reserved.

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