Referendum

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Editorial and Opinion  |  House: Booksie Classic

Submitted: May 28, 2019

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Submitted: May 28, 2019

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Referendum

 

 

noun

noun: referendum; plural noun: referenda; plural noun: referendums

  1. a general vote by the electorate on a single political question which has been referred to them for a direct decision.

synonyms:

public vote, plebiscite, popular vote, ballot, poll

"he called for a referendum on the death penalty"

 

 

A referendum seems to be held when governments feel that their making a direct decision might be controversial. Rather than go ahead and make it themselves, they divide in to groups, some supporting one outcome, others the opposite. Information and biased reports are supplied in abundance, and the voting population is told to go and pick which option they would prefer.

There have been quite a few held in Ireland recently, one on abortion, and one just last week on changes to the divorce laws. The Nice Treaty and the Lisbon Treaty both had second referendums when the decision of the first was considered to be detrimental. By holding a second vote there is plenty of option for manipulation of information, for the use of scare tactics; and the whole process of holding a second referendum seems to negate the very holding of one in the first place.

You will not find any second referendums being held when the results follow the governments line of thinking. It is only when the results are unexpected, fly in the face of the established political thought that the idea arises.

Now, on to Brexit. There is so much talk about a second referendum being held; after all, when the first one was held it was inconceivable to politicians that the population of Britain would vote to leave the EU. They were wrong, but it was close.

I don’t support Brexit, but I do not support a second referendum either. The government asked people what they wanted and they got their answer – a severe kick in the teeth to the establishment.

The closeness of the vote makes it even more important in my view that a second vote should not be held. It would be totally divisive, unless, of course, the intent is to cause extensive civil unrest.

The government can claim that the voters did not fully understand the consequences of their vote. Well, the fault of that lies squarely at the government’s feet, for it was their duty to spell out the consequences both good and bad before the referendum was held. To back out, to try to swing opinion, is in no way governing for the people, but instructing them to ‘listen to reason from those that know better’.

Brexit is a mess. It is going to continue to be a mess and David Cameron has a lot to answer for. If the clocks could be turned back and no referendum had been held then me along with so many others would be glad to see the back of it. They can’t though; the referendum was held, the population voted to leave the EU and now the government has a responsibility to deliver on that promise one way or another.


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