The Many Wonders of Mumbai

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The following is an article “The Many Wonders of Mumbai” by Marc Primo.

Anyone who has seen the film Slumdog Millionaire might be quick to assume that Mumbai is a place filled with street peddlers, terrible traffic, and a mix of tall office buildings and discolored corrugated roofs. Few actually know that Mumbai is the financial heart of India where real estate costs a fortune and tourism attractions abound.

The Many Wonders of Mumbai

The following is an article “The Many Wonders of Mumbai” by Marc Primo.

 

Anyone who has seen the film Slumdog Millionaire might be quick to assume that Mumbai is a place filled with street peddlers, terrible traffic, and a mix of tall office buildings and discolored corrugated roofs. Few actually know that Mumbai is the financial heart of India where real estate costs a fortune and tourism attractions abound.

 
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When traveling to Mumbai, make sure you wear cool and soft clothes to beat the heat. If you want to explore the many wonders this busy city has to offer, here’s a guide that will make your trip truly worthwhile.
 

Gateway of India. With a panoramic sight of the Arabian Sea, the Gateway of India and its imposing arch typifies both ancient Mumbai and its present state. The 20th century structure is made of yellow Kharodi basalt and is located on the waterfront at Wellington Pier where you’ll find many colorful boats that carry passengers and goods. Attend the Elephanta Festival of music where you can dance and join over 2,000 locals and tourists in various attractions from vocal recitals to live music and folk dances.

 

Elephant caves. Accessible by a 10-kilometer sail and a train ride from the city of Mumbai is the Elephanta caves features stunning rock sculptures of Lord Shiva and other various Indian gods that tell ancient stories of the country’s rich culture. It is one of the most interesting tourist attractions in India with beautiful temple-like pillars that will truly make you appreciate the country’s history and traditions. This beautiful destination is also known as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, so you know that it’s always worth the trip.

 

Colaba Causeway. If you are a shopaholic then you’ll get a good fix at Colaba where items can be scored for a bargain. This colorful district was established during the British rule and is connected by a bridge to Old Woman’s Island. Among the many good finds in Colaba are souvenirs, cheap jewelry, shoes, and clothes. You’ll also find the Avante Cottage Craft where you can buy the best handicrafts in Mumbai at reasonable rates.

 

Taj Mahal Palace Hotel. Across the Gateway of India sits this plush 1903 hotel, built especially for high-ranking foreign royalties. The Heritage Wing, which was recently redesigned after it suffered major damage during the terrorist attack in Mumbai in 2008, and the Tower Wing which was added to cater to more guests in 1973, make up this luxury palace. Relax and enjoy afternoon high teas at the Sea Lounge and get a clear view of the bay while you enjoy drinks at Harbour Bar.

 

Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus. You can immerse in the influence of the Brits when you come and visit the old Victoria Terminal Station, now known as Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus. Another world heritage site, this train station is visited daily by 3 million passengers, making it one of the busiest and largest in the world. You will definitely notice the Gothic revival-inspired architecture that merges with traditional Indian aesthetics that give off a unique visual delight.

 

Marine Drive. Stroll along the shores of the Arabian Sea via Marine Drive, the most popular road in all of Mumbai. In Chowpatty Beach, you’ll chance upon artistically-designed buildings. During the afternoons, it transforms into one of the most romantic spots in the city where couples hang out to marvel at the sunset. The 3.6 kilometer boulevard links Nariman Point to Malabar Hill in a C-shape pattern that illuminates at night like a string of pearls, giving it its other name Queen’s Necklace.


Submitted: August 10, 2019

© Copyright 2022 Marc Primo Travels. All rights reserved.

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