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TRUST

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Religion and Spirituality  |  House: Booksie Classic
In whom do we place our trust becomes a central question we, as humans, must deal with and answer time after time as we go through life.

Submitted: August 26, 2019

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Submitted: August 26, 2019

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TRUST

Op/Ed by James Strauss

 

When you become a Freemason, sometimes referred to simply as 'Mason,' there is a long process of learning that you must first have gone through, and then be able to demonstrate you have learned, almost to the point where it is incorporated into your very being. The 'training' is long, hard and filled with tons of memory data about things that seem to make no sense at the time. Whatever the merits of being a Mason, there is one point in the process of receiving the initial confirmation (called the 3rd degree) wherein your are marched out in front of the 'brethren,' to be questioned. The key question put to the applicant is always the same: "In whom do you place your trust?" 

I ask you now, in this article; "In whom do you place your trust?" That question not only lays there at the very foundation of the Masonic Order, it also stirs deep down inside the souls of every man, woman and child of the species human on planet earth. It is a question seldom verbalized. However, it is a question that repeats silently time and again through the ages and through the life span of every individual. 

How is it that we come to trust? By life experience, would be the first and most effective way. We watch, we participate with others, and then we either come to trust or we do not. "Actions speak louder than words," is a seemingly light question but in reality has weight and depth to it. The second way we come to trust is based upon the word of others or the documentary 'evidence' we might be provided or discover. The third way we come to trust is all about time. The longer we trust the deeper the trust becomes, unless superseded by data or information that rebuts it.

We are all tribal, even those humans who claim to be solitary and not needing social contact or societal approval. Those whom are not tribal are lying about it, and probably receiving more attention and social contact because they claim not to want or need it. The foundation of tribalism is trust. The single biggest impediment to civilization's rise is belief systems built on foundations that lack the trust of other humans. The advent of the Internet, cell phones and television has eroded those belief systems because these instruments are such hugely successful devices for using data to steer present and future behavior. Since their invention and application, trust has been on the wane, which has not led to tribal or social failure, but it has reduced the amount of happiness or bliss humans have come to feel about the potential of what we all consider life itself. We must all struggle, non-stop and all the time, to trust, and then to trust again, while at the same time winnowing our way through those things that might erode our trust, justifiably or not. Giving complete trust is not possible for human beings, not when trusting other human beings, but to have what Joe Campbell called 'bliss,' we must all endeavor to experience and apply as much of it as we possibly can all the time.

 


© Copyright 2019 James Strauss. All rights reserved.

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