Fibonacci Sequence in Nature

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
Fibonacci sequence represented in nature.

Submitted: September 06, 2019

A A A | A A A

Submitted: September 06, 2019

A A A

A A A


0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 521, 898, 1,419, 2,317, et cetera.

In its simplest manifestations, this numerical sequence is seen in flower petals. Lilies have three petals, and buttercups possess five. We can find flowers with eight petals, such as the White Dryad, and daisies often grow thirteen petals. We even see the sequence in the way that the seed buds grow in the head of the flower. In plants like sunflowers and daisies, the seeds spiral away from the center and typically reach a total equal to a Fibonacci number. Tree branches also tend to exhibit this pattern, either growing new branches or changing growth direction at Fibonacci ratios, and pine cones also favor this trait, though they do this through arc ratios as opposed to strictly numerical ratios. The diagram of a pinecone below exemplifies this decimally, in which the arc distances measured are Fibonacci numbers, just decimal ones. Aside from plants, however, we can still find the sequence- even in humans; even in the very building blocks of our existence. The proteins that give our thoughts and feelings a material home are wound together in a Fibonacci spiral, and this same spiral also is characterized by Fibonacci distances. As are many infinitesimally small things, DNA is measured in a unit called an angstrom, and it happens to be to measure 34 angstroms long by 21 angstroms wide for each full cycle of its double helix spiral. But there is more to it than just that, and in order to truly understand it, we need to grasp another element of the sequence. The Fibonacci sequence is not merely a series of sums, but it is also a series of sums which, when using division, forever approach the Golden Number: 1.618. For instance, when one divides 5 by 3, the outcome is 1.666, and when one divides 8 by 5, the outcome is 1.60. After 15 numbers into the sequence, the simple division approaches the actual Golden Number being accurate to the first fifteen decimal places. In DNA, we see this Golden Number as well. The cross-sectional view of the DNA double helix depicts a decagon, which is essentially two pentagons angled at 36 degrees from one another, and so the DNA traces a pentagonal pattern. This is significant because the ratio of the diagonal of a pentagon to its side is 1 to 1.618. Even in the smallest building blocks of life, we can find this numerical sequence. In the same way that we can observe DNA spirals to uncover the Fibonacci sequence, we can see through telescopes to observe galactic spirals, and uncover the sequence there as well. In galaxies, there are often logarithmic spirals. We would see a pattern of rectangles in which the ratio of the sides a/b is equal to the 1.618 results in a spiraling nesting process that can be repeated into infinity. 

 


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