OTHERHOOD: A Film Review

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Status: Finished  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic
The following is a movie review “Otherhood” by Marc Primo Pulisci.
Release date: 02 August 2019
Director: Cindy Chupack
Language: English
Production companies: Mandalay Pictures, Welle Entertainment
Producers: Jason Michael Berman, Cathy Schulman

Submitted: September 10, 2019

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Submitted: September 10, 2019

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OTHERHOOD: A Film Review

The following is a movie review “Otherhood” by Marc Primo Pulisci.

Release date: 02 August 2019

Director: Cindy Chupack

Language: English

Production companies: Mandalay Pictures, Welle Entertainment

Producers: Jason Michael Berman, Cathy Schulman

 

Netflix is arguably the most popular streaming platform in today’s digital world. It offers a diverse set of television series, movies, and documentaries. Recently, it released a dramedy called ‘Otherhood’, featuring seasoned lead stars Angela Bassett as Carol, Patricia Arquette as Gillian, and Felicity Huffman as Helen, with direction by television producer Cindy Chupack (Divorce, Modern Family, Love Bites). 

The story follows three mothers who were brought together by their sons who have been best friends their whole lives. Carol, Gillian, and Helen have stayed together through their sons’ graduation, proms, and even trips to the hospital. Even after the boys had left for New York City, the three mothers continued to get together annually for brunch on Mother’s Day in the suburban town of Poughkeepsie as their “tradition.” 

As the movie progresses, we see how much the boys have distanced themselves from their mothers to the point that Angela sends herself flowers pretending that they are from her son. By now, the mothers have decided to pack up their bags and visit their sons, Matt, Daniel, and Paul in the Big Apple. 

Little do they know that they are in for a treat. I mean, who doesn’t love surprises, right? In the city, Matt runs a successful magazine, but Angela does not like what it promotes; Paul had a hard time coming out because he was afraid of how Helen would react; and Daniel is sick and tired of his mom micromanaging his life, which is why he always keeps her in the dark. 

The mothers believed that by showing up unannounced in their sons’ houses would be the reunion they had always dreamed of. However, over the course of the trip, Carol, Gillian, and Helen soon realize that they, too, have to change how they treat themselves, their sons, and each other. They  learn that somehow, they need to try and see things through different perspectives. 

Indeed, a movie with a narrative like this is what the world needs right now. It may be about mothers, but if you look deeper, it could be about any of us. The film plays on empathy and the importance of taking the feelings of others into consideration when making decisions because we never really know how it might affect them later on. As a bonus, the continuous flow of comic situations is a big plus.

However, let me warn you that it does have a bit of an open ending. Why? Because the three mothers never seem to have talked about how they would move forward as best friends after their all-out confrontation during the movie’s climax. Chupack, in a way, left it hanging for the audience to ponder after the credits roll. Nevertheless, if you are looking for a feel-good movie about moms, then this sure is a good bet.


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