Battle Shot Pistol.

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Status: In Progress  |  Genre: Non-Fiction  |  House: Booksie Classic


Battle Shot - Pistol

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When at War there are very few short cuts to personal survival, only by honing military skills to a sharp edge increases an individual’s chance of survival in battle. One such imperative skill is becoming a fast and accurate pistol shot.

As with all military skills, practice is the key element. However, newbies to military pistol shooting must be able to shoot consistently good groups before ever attempting any of the rapid-fire practices.

Military pistol shooting is all about speed, accuracy, and tactics, and there is no point in being able to fire six rounds in five seconds from the pistol holster if none of them hits the target, or if the spread of those shots is so extreme that no real group is visible. Therefore, speed without accuracy is frankly worthless.

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Just as with any firearm, a pistol needs zeroing, and if a shooter is using a weapon with non-adjustable fixed sights, there is a need to find out where their shots impact a target in relation to the shooters point-of-aim.

In order to adjust the sights or alter the point of aim the shooter must shoot a series of consistent groups at 23 meters. Although the more experienced are often able to zero their weapons on a US Marine Corps Marksmanship Qualification Target, a newbie should stick with a bulls-eye target as this offers a far more visible aiming point.

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For pistol marksmanship, the firing stance adopted by a shooter is extremely important and therefore must be mastered, before any live-fire practice on the firing range, for a stable position makes for safe range handling and firing of the pistol being used.

Importantly, any firing stance practice enacted using a proper firearm must be on a well-constituted and properly regulated firing range, and the weapon used made empty and proved CLEAR!

However, if for whatever reason a shooter is required to practice firing stances off-range then practice must be conducted using only a dummy pistol or replica pistol emptied and made CLEAR of dry (blank) rounds. Under no circumstances at any time whatsoever should a proper firearm be used, even if guaranteed made CLEAR!

 

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The Isosceles firing position.

 

The shooter places their body directly facing the target with the feet positioned no more than a shoulder width apart. They hold the right weapon-controlling arm and supporting left arm out straight and adopt the correct grip position.

The shooter must not be afraid to modify position and grip to find out what works best for them, but must make sure they are adopting the same positions for each shot.

 

The Isosceles position offers reasonable accuracy but is not particularly good for controlling rapid-fire practices. The Isosceles position as favored by Police forces is adequate for Police use but is not suitable for many combat situations.

In addition, for more weapon control, it may prove preferable to sit into the Isosceles position as the shooter brings the weapon up into the aim but making sure they do not spend too long in the aim position. For if the shooter’s arms start to get tired, then movement will cause the sight picture to become unstable so the shooter should return to the ready position and rest before firing the next shot.

 

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Weaver stance firing position.

For the inexperienced shooter, the Weaver stance may initially feel a little on the awkward side, but for combat shooting where you need speed and reasonable accuracy this is certainly the position to use. Nevertheless, the Weaver stance works well because the pistol is jammed between two opposing forces when the shooter pushes out with the right hand and pulls back with the left.

The Weaver is by far the most stable of combat pistol stances yet devised, and can if so required be slightly varied to suit each shooter's techniques or combat situation, such as in FIBUA, fighting in built up areas.

 

Initiating the Weaver firing position

 

The shooter points their left shoulder towards the target and places their feet approximately a shoulder width apart.

The shooter keeps their right arm straight or just very slightly bent, and keeps their left arm and elbow at a 50-degree angle.

The shooter cradles the weapon controlling hand with the left supporting hand. Pressure from the left supporting hand onto the fingers of the weapon controlling hand reduces the muzzle jump caused by recoil. 

 

Initiating the “Weaver ready” position

 

The shooter adopts the proper Weaver firing stance and pivots the arms downwards until the pistol is about 45 degrees below horizontal.

If the shooter is using a semi-auto pistol, then the trigger finger must be outside the trigger guard and the thumb safety applied. The shooter must make sure that their grip does not foul the slide, or they will end up with stoppages. Crossing the thumbs is one way to avoid this.

As the shooter brings the gun up into the aim position, they operate the safety catch with their thumb and place their finger on the trigger.

 

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Addendum

 

If shooting a revolver double action when initiating the Weaver ready position, the shooter may rest the trigger finger lightly on the trigger as the heavy pull prevents the likelihood of an N.D, negligent discharge.

In addition, if the semi-auto shooter has large hands, they must beware of hammer bite to the web of the weapon controlling hand, between the thumb and forefinger .To avoid this painful experience the large-handed shooter should keep the grip a fraction lower.

 

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Note;-An alternative to the Weaver grip is the Cooper grip, where the index finger does not rest on the trigger guard.

 

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Initiating the Cooper Grip

 

The shooter holds the pistol straight in the right hand with their thumb placed no lower than the top portion of the left stock. They wrap the supporting hand around the fingers of the weapon controlling hand and hold the thumb high, away from any magazine release button and keeping the grip firm but not squeezing the hands too tightly.

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For combat contacts at very close range where there is but little time available to neutralize the opposition, and when the target exposure time does not allow the shooter proper sight alignment. The combat crouch is faster than the Weaver firing position and makes the shooter slightly less of a target.

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Initiating the Combat Crouch

 

 The shooter stands with the feet apart, a natural stance with the left foot slightly leading, therefore allowing a one-step advance to target if required, and slightly sitting into the position whilst at the same time using controled aggression, punches the pistol at the target.

As the shooter reaches the end of the punch, they fire a double tap - two rounds fired in quick succession, and then concentrating on the foresight only they keep double tapping at the widest part of the target until achieving elimination of the threat.

To be life-saving effective in battle the combat crouch requires fluid movement and conditioned response therefore much practice of the Combat Crouch is required.

Note;- As with all firing stances the Combat Crouch may be slightly, comfort varied, to suit the individual shooter.

 

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Addendum

If the shooter is firing single-action on a revolver or semi-automatic pistol, only the pad of their forefinger should contact the trigger. The rest of their index finger must not contact the frame during trigger operation. Therefore, finger on the trigger, the first pad is applying the pressure to the trigger.

However, when shooting a revolver or semi-automatic pistol double-action, the shooter places the trigger finger so that pressure on the trigger is applied from the first joint. This ensures that maximum strength is used to achieve a smooth double-action pull.

For Revolvers fired double-action, or Semi-Automatic pistols fired double-action, firing the first shot, requires the shooters first joint of their index finger placed on the trigger.

Single-action means that the hammer of a revolver or semi-automatic pistol requires cocking by the shooters thumb, and then fired by light pressure from their trigger finger on the weapons trigger. When shooting a revolver or semi-automatic pistol during a precision target discipline, this technique is the one always employed.

Double-action means that a revolvers or semi-automatic pistols hammer is cocked and fired by one mechanical movement when a shooters trigger finger squeezes upon the weapons trigger. Although the double-action technique may prove a slightly harder skill for a novice shooter to master, it is always used in combat disciplines. The only exception to the combat discipline rule is at ranges of 25 meters and beyond where single-action gives more accuracy, or alternatively when shooting weak handed around the corner of a wall or from behind a barricade.

A firearms trigger must always be engaged using a positive squeezing action. It must not be snatched as poor trigger control is one of the main causes of misplaced shots when using a firearm. In essence, proper control of the trigger is a skill that requires mastering.

 

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Correct grip for Revolver

The shooter holds the revolver straight in the right hand as with the semi-automatic. The thumb of the weapon controlling hand may be held high, or curled downwards, as this prevents any detrimental contact with the cylinder release mechanism.  

The shooter wraps the supporting hand around the fingers of the firing hand and rests the left thumb over the right thumb.

 

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Single and Double-Action .

 

For revolvers fired double-action, or semi-automatic pistols fired double-action, firing the first shot, requires the first joint of the index finger placed on the trigger. 

Single-action means that the hammer of a revolver or semi-automatic pistol requires cocking by the shooters thumb, and then fired by light pressure from their trigger finger on the weapons trigger. When shooting a revolver or semi-automatic during a precision target discipline, this technique is the one always employed.

Double-action means a revolvers or semi-automatic pistols hammer is cocked and fired in one mechanical movement by the shooters trigger finger pulling on the revolvers trigger, and although the double-action technique is a slightly harder weapon control skill for a novice shooter to master, it should always be used for combat disciplines.

The only exception to the combat discipline rule is at ranges of 45 meters and beyond where single-action gives more accuracy, or alternatively when shooting weak handed around the corner of a wall or from behind a barricade.

 

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USMC Pistol Target With Scoring Areas


Submitted: April 12, 2020

© Copyright 2020 Sergeant Walker. All rights reserved.

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