The Send-Off

Reads: 209  | Likes: 1  | Shelves: 0  | Comments: 0

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

Status: Finished  |  Genre: Mystery and Crime  |  House: Booksie Classic


Such a handsome young man! Leo Pinsky did not look like a Leo Pinsky; he looked like a movie star. And of course he never called himself "Leo Pinsky" at work. It was too, well, "ethnic," as they say. So he was Bert Chilton. At least this month he was. 

Leo could slip into any elegant bar, club, or restaurant and make half a dozen friends, male and female, in ten minutes. Of course, that made  him perfect for our organization. But he was attracting too much attention. So I decided to give him his final assignment right in the middle of Grand Central Station. He was going to attract attention anyway, right? So let him be seen with a small older woman, a dowdy aunt, perhaps, seeing off her innocent nephew after his visit to the big city.

The fact is, we really were sending him out of town, though he didn't know it till I told him. He'd been seen with too many people who had turned up dead. Sure, there was never any proof--he was too good at what he did, and, as the actuaries say, "correlation is not causation." But causation was there, and someday someone smart would make the connection. And not everyone on the other side was as straight-arrow as they made out in their indignant speeches. So Leo had to leave. There was just one more kill, if you'll indulge an old lady for being so direct. I gave him the envelope, followed it with a chaste little kiss on the cheek, and waved him off into the dark tunnel that would take him away from us. Grand Central is so dramatic, a little fuss was warranted.

I hoped the note would confuse him enough that he would have to read it over and over again to make sense of it.  He might feel hurt at first--surely he would not be expecting such ingratitude from us. I'm sure he woud try to puzzle it out on the train as it took him north. I used language that a little old aunt should never use. It would read, in fact, like a poison-pen letter.  And that would be most appropriate, wouldn't it?

After all, he had his methods--and I had mine.


Submitted: May 02, 2020

© Copyright 2021 Richard Risemberg. All rights reserved.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • Pinterest
  • Invite

Add Your Comments:


Facebook Comments

More Mystery and Crime Short Stories

Other Content by Richard Risemberg

Book / Literary Fiction

Short Story / Mystery and Crime